feminist groups

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For Refinery29’s celebration of Black History Month we put together a list of Black men and women you ought to know. Their legacy in civil rights, feminism, and LGBTQ equality lives on today.

  1. Bayard Rustin — A leading Black figure in the civil rights movement and advisor to Martin Luther King, he was the architect of the 1963 March on Washington and was heavily involved in the first Freedom Rides. He was also gay and a registered communist who went to jail for his sexual orientation. Although widely heralded, he was attacked even by fellow activists for his faith in nonviolence, unapologetic queerness, and attention to income equality. President Obama honored Rustin posthumously with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2013.
  2. Combaheee River Collective — A seminal Black lesbian feminist group active from 1974-1980. Although officially short lived, its influence has been major. The group is best known for writing the Combaheee River Collective Statement, an important document in promoting the idea that social change must be intersectional — and that Black women’s needs were not being met by mainstream white feminism and therefore must strike out on their own. Members of the collective included Audre Lorde and…Chirlane McCray, now First Lady of New York City and author of the landmark essay “I Am a Lesbian,” published in Essence in 1979.
  3. John Carlos, Tommie Smith, and Peter Norman — The winners of the 1968 Mexico City Olympics 200 Meter Sprint. In one of the proudest and most political moments of sports history, John Carlos and Tommie Smith raised their leather-gloved fists in the Black Power salute. They wore black socks without shoes to represent black poverty and a scarf and necklace to symbolize “those individuals that were lynched, or killed and that no-one said a prayer for, that were hung and tarred. It was for those thrown off the side of the boats in the middle passage.”

    We also include in our list Peter Norman, the white Australian silver medalist from that ceremony, to commemorate his solidarity with the two Black athletes. White people are more than indebted to black history, and Norman is an excellent example of a white ally. Although he didn’t perform the black power salute, he publicly supported the duo without regard to personal safety or retribution. Norman was penalized for his alliance with Carlos and Smith and was never again allowed to compete in any Olympics despite repeatedly qualifying. Largely forgotten and barred from major sporting events, he became a gym teacher and worked at a butcher shop. At his funeral in 2006, John Carlos and Tommie Smith were his pallbearers.
  4. The Friendship Nine — This group of nine Black students from Friendship Junior College willingly went to jail without bail in 1961 after staging a sit-in at McCrory’s lunch counter in Rock Hill, South Carolina. They pioneered the civil rights strategy “Jail, No Bail,” which placed the financial burden for racist incarceration back on the state. They’re appreciated today for their bravery and strategic ingenuity. In 2015 their conviction was finally overturned and prosecutor Kevin Brackett personally apologized to the eight living members of the group.
  5. Barbara Jordan — A lawyer and politician, Barbara Jordan was the first Black woman elected to the Texas Senate after Reconstruction, the first southern Black woman to be elected as a US Senator, and the first Black woman to deliver a keynote speech at the Democratic National Convention. Her keynote address is widely considered the greatest of all time, aided by her charismatic and eloquent public speaking skills. She is also remembered as one of the leaders of the impeachment of Richard Nixon. We chose the above quote to illustrate her unique punchy sense of humor.
  6. Pauli Murray — This civil rights activist, feminist, and poet was a hugely successful lawyer who is also recognized as the first Black female Episcopal priest. Like many figures on this list, Murray was acutely aware of the complex relationship between race and gender, and referred to sexism as “Jane Crow,” comparing midcentury treatment of women to that of African Americans in the South. Although she graduated from Howard University first in her class, she was barred from enrolling as a postgraduate at Harvard because she was a woman. Instead, in 1965 she became the first African American to receive a JSD from Yale Law. Once armed with a law degree she became a formidable force in advancing feminist and civil rights. She is a cofounder of the National Organization for Women (NOW). She also identified as having an “inverted sex instinct,” which she used instead of “homosexual” to describe her complicated gender identity and lifelong attraction to women.
Introduction to the National D.Va Association 안녕하세요! 전국디바협회입니다.

This is the Tumblr page of For D.Va (National D.Va Association). Nice to meet you all!

안녕하세요, 전국디바협회의 텀블러 페이지가 생성되었습니다! 여러분을 만나뵙게 되어 정말 기쁩니다.


- What is For D.Va? 전국디바협회가 무엇인가요?

For D.Va is a Korean feminist gamers’ group, which acts for a non-sexist world where a person like D.Va could appear.

전국디바협회는 한국인 페미니스트 게이머들의 모임으로, 디바와 같은 인물이 실제로 나타날 수 있는, 성평등한 세계를 만들기 위해 활동하고 있습니다.


- How did For D.Va appear? 전국디바협회는 어떻게 시작되었나요?

For D.Va (National D.Va Association) first started off as a feminist gamer group, gathered to voice our opinions about (currently suspended) President Park Geun Hye. After the President’s suspension, we decided not to disperse, but to keep fighting for gender equality.

전국디바협회는 박근혜 대통령에 대한 목소리를 내기 위해 모인 페미니스트 게이머들의 모임으로 시작되었습니다. 박근혜 대통령의 직무정지 이후, 전국디바협회는 해체하는 대신 성평등을 위해 계속 싸워나가기로 결정했습니다.


- Why is D.Va the mascot of For D.Va? 왜 디바를 마스코트로 사용하나요?

We all know that D.Va is a Korean Overwatch character, who is a woman yet thrives in the gaming world. The reason she became our mascot is because we thought that in a sexist country like ours, it would be impossible for a person like her to appear, especially after the case of Geguri. Geguri is a Korean woman progamer, who was accused of using hacks just because ‘it was impossible for women to play games that well’, which was, of course, false. So we decided to act for feminism under her emblem, so that in 2060, someone like D.Va could actually appear.

디바는 오버워치의 한국인 캐릭터로서, 여자임에도 불구하고 천재 프로게이머가 되었습니다. 그가 전국디바협회의 마스코트가 된 이유는, 만약 미래의 한국이 지금과 같이 성차별적인 국가라면 디바와 같은 사람이 등장하는 것은 불가능하기 때문입니다. 이는 게구리 선수의 사건이 증명합니다. 게구리 선수는 한국의 여성 프로게이머로서, 단순히 ‘여자는 저렇게 게임을 잘 할 수 없다’는 이유만으로 핵 사용 의심을 받았습니다. 이는 물론 거짓이었습니다. 따라서 전국디바협회는 디바를 우리의 마스코트로 삼아서, 그와 같은 사람이 실제로 나타날 수 있는 성평등한 2060년을 만들기 위해 페미니즘적인 활동을 하게 되었습니다.


- What does For D.Va do? 전국디바협회는 무엇을 하나요?

Aside from participating in marches and protests, we are currently running a feminist’s book club, which has a meeting around every two weeks. Also, we are planning a Women-only(Genderqueer not excluded) Overwatch competition. We are also coming up with ideas such as a feminist goods store, but that is still just an idea.

시위와 행진에 참여하는 것 이외에도, 전국디바협회는 페미니즘 독서 모임을 매 2주마다 가지고 있습니다. 또한, 전국디바협회는 여성 전용 (젠더퀴어 포함) 오버워치 경기를 기획하고 있습니다. 페미니즘 굿즈 스토어와 같은 아이디어도 구상중입니다.


Thank you for the attention!

관심 가져주셔서 감사합니다!


Link to For D.Va’s Twitter page 전국디바협회 트위터 페이지 링크 : https://twitter.com/for_diva_

Me no gusta feminism

I used to be a feminist, back when I got into pro-life stuff and discovered pro-life feminists and their advocacy.

But, shortly after the birth of my first daughter, I decided to drop the label. It was months in the making, as the decision came about after being exposed to many issues I discovered within the movement.

Note that this is not any kind of attack on people who find that their use of the word “feminist” best describes and helps their cause. More power to you. But I am not you, and I have different ideals and standards when it comes to political movements. I am hoping that by sharing this – as terse as this will come off at times – feminists can get a better idea of why the whole world isn’t jumping onto the bandwagon.

Use it to improve your feminist work, to point out toxic behavior in fellow activists, think I am out of my mind and think I am wrong, whatever: I don’t care. I am just grateful that someone can listen patiently.

So what is up with my disapproval of feminism?:

1) Feminism is incoherent and unstable.

Look up the definition of feminism and you get the vague explanation of how it’s about women’s equal rights/welfare. Even in the earliest days, women activists had differing ideals concerning womanhood, equality, justice, and how to achieve it all. How you define fighting for women’s rights is all dependent on what you think is best for the gender. This can range from keeping them inside all day guarded by family to enforcing the independent working woman ideal.

“But that’s not REAL feminism!!!” is often cried out when these differing actions/opinions are pointed out, and it is a pointless accusation. Feminism is what you make of it! Literally anyone can be a feminist.

There is no central leader, only leaders of various, independent feminist groups big or small; there is no central manifesto, only early writings that may or may not be looked upon, and opinionated works of different feminist philosophers; and most importantly, every individual woman will have her own unique outlook to the welfare of her sex and for her own life.

I can’t get behind a mish mash of ideas. Nor can I pretend that I am speaking for ALL women when we are all so different from one another. I need something solid, sturdy, and with a strong, unshakable foundation. Feminism just doesn’t have that.

2) It has a shady past that I can’t get over: and yes, that includes the first/second wave feminists.

First wave: benefited largely upper class white women; anti-Catholic sentiments among some prominent figures; demanded equal rights but not equal responsibility (ex: getting the right to vote but not being required to sign up for the draft); some protesters WERE violent, if I remember correctly; they also played a large role in the medicalization of birth which involved smearing campaigns against midwives, sending many women to hospitals where they were treated terribly; this same smear campaign also lead to lower income women having difficulty affording prenatal care as the more affordable homebirth midwives were made illegal. Some also were apparently hypocritical even then, as is evidenced by the famous GK Chesterton quote: “It [feminism] is mixed up with a muddled idea that women are free when they serve their employers but slaves when they help their husbands.“

Second wave: Bought into the deliberate lies about mass deaths from “back alley abortions”; lied about Jane Roe and TO her in Roe vs Wade to legalize it; the lawyer downright calling Jane Roe white trash and ignorant; were convinced that they needed birth control to be dispensed everywhere, and didn’t seem to care very much that birth control had been tested on poor, POC women and that it would discriminate against women who wanted more than one or two kids/wanted to breastfeed while working; attacked religious faiths for “sexist practices” such as veiling and lied to women of faith about their religion to convince them to protest it; I could go on because I find out more all the time but I can stop.

third wave: I don’t even have to list here. Y’all know what I am talking about. While more religious/conservative feminists have popped up, they still buy into the myth of a patriarchy and many still talk over legitimate men’s issues, or even outright mock it. Or mock people who are more conservative/religiously devout. (Looking at you, New Wave Feminists :))) )

3) The members are dangerously guillable and buy into sexist/bigoted ideals far too easily.

A lot of this ties into the last point. Feminism easily falls for the latest so-called progressive ideals without thinking how it actually affects them and others in the following generations. (Thanks for the shitty state of women’s health care!) They do not thoroughly question anything, leading to blind acceptance of any misleading factoid that shows them how oppressed they are.

The biggest example of this, for me personally, is the outright acceptance of birth control. While some feminists are questioning it these days because of its adverse affects on women’s rights, health, and its sexist/racist undertones, many still try to tout it as some kind of Savior for Womankind. The health risks and social ramifications be damned: gimme my consequence free sex!!! Because men can get sex without pregnancy so this makes us “equal” somehow!!!

And then they try to make it sound like it’s the only way to space babies and allows women to work, but never considered other more natural options that don’t shut down our fertility and do a better job of respecting women’s rights (hint hint, NFP). And the ramifications of the hook up culture? Feminists demanded that women have the right to sleep around “just like men”, and then scrambled around to come up with overly-complicated consent etiquette when they realized women were being used and even raped.

4) No, feminism doesn’t care about men. It never did and it doesn’t have to!

Christina Hoff Summers is the closest I can think of a feminist who points out men’s issues, but I haven’t heard of her trying anything to change it either other than talking about it.

Things like circumcision, male abuse, male assault, workplace deaths, and more are brushed under the rug. Try and bring men’s issues to the table at your next feminist meeting, and see how far it takes you: and all without mentioning “toxic masculinity” or “it doesn’t happen as much with men as with women”.

There is nothing wrong with having a movement focused on only one part of the human race: but it is damning to use that label, focus only on one group of people, and then pretend you speak for ALL humans.

Feminism was never meant to be a human rights movement, only a women’s rights movement. There is no shame in that. Yet they continue to act as if its the end all be all of any advocacy group ever.

This may naturally lead into intersectional feminism, which jumps into other movements such as LGBTQ, childwelfare, etc. But it only shows how feminism MUST take a legit issue and twist it around to make it about women or the patriarchy. It’s ineffective and even back-peddles progress.

5) Feminism acts like it has the monopoly on women’s rights and that I owe it my “allegiance”.

It doesn’t. It never has. I am living proof of it. For the past three years since I have dropped the label, I am still passionate about how NFP can further women’s welfare in health and relationships, and beyond. It has even led me to issues such as birthing rights, issues of working mothers, and more!

But more importantly, it opened the door to issues faced by men, and children of both genders. I even gained a newer perspective on unique issues such as gender dysphoria and racism. When I took a step back and realized that the issues were just a shitty culture from the result of many different actions/people and not necessarily one power group, I gained a much more wholesome view of humanity and its downfalls. We’re in this together as a species!

Yet, I only learned all of this outside of feminism’s rose colored glasses. Leaving feminism freed me to truly understand all this. Maybe it was different for other women, but for me and others like me, it’s very enlightening.

6) There really isn’t a patriarchy. 

idk what to put here. I never felt the overbearingness of man push me down, and I’m not going to ignore my personal experience and that of my own female family members for the sake of an accepted theory of feminism. There are certainly sexist attitudes still hanging around, but hardly because of patriarchy (in fact, I would blame mainstream feminism for parts of that, see points #2 and #3). That, and this deadbeat patriarchy theory de-legitimizes the very real issues and their source problems that men face in society.

7) Much of feminism is inherently anti-Catholic.

Y’all know I am not perfect when it comes to being Catholic, but I would rather walk through the Amazon jungle barefoot than walk with a movement that has never liked nor respected the Church since its earliest developments in the early 20th Century. (This includes lowering the role and importance of Mother Mary because of her Perpetual Virginity being “offensive” to women. :))) )

Even with some Catholics saying they are feminist because of their beliefs, I know too well that being “feminist” is not a core tenet of Catholicism. That’s just an unnecessary add on. Not to mention, the Church has been very woman-friendly since, idk, the time of Jesus? So it’s not like throwing on a political label is really improving that.

(This doesn’t mean there aren’t issues to be discussed within the Church concerning womanhood in the past or present: only that I feel feminism is an intrusion that is unnecessary at best, and blinding to the mission of the Church at worse, and the mission being: spreading the Gospels to lost souls).

Also, there is no use ignoring that a grand majority of feminists today - as well as the loudest ones - simply support practices and ideals that go against Church Teaching. You can try and “take back feminism” if you wish, but it was never “ours” to begin with, nor will Catholicism improve this unbalanced movement by inserting rosaries and “girl power” saints.

Western women face legitimate issues in our society and I am all for tackling them!

We may not be “oppressed” as angry Anti-SJWs claim, but there is still so much improvement to be made. Things like childcare and work, abortion, healthcare, etc are hot topics for a reason. They affect ME and MY DAUGHTERS as much as any woman. I am going to be a part of the solution as much as I can be! I am sure that other active women, feminist or not, understand how I find these things important.

But I can not stand by a philosophy that is jumbled up, toxic, hypocritical, lacking sense, and downplaying or denying the very real issues that the other gender face. The majority are against my ideals/way of making things work and I don’t want any part of it.

Good has come from feminism in various ways but that doesn’t change that it has done plenty of bad that I am not comfortable with. And because it’s had issues from the very beginning, there really isn’t an “original” feminism that we can revert to: it’s always had problems and will continue to have them.

If you’re feminist then have fun with that, but I ask that you consider these points whenever you question people like me for not wanting to join in. Not all of us are hateful anti-feminist narks who think western women live life in a dreamland. We just don’t like many parts and histories of the feminist movement.

Thanks for taking the time to read, it really does mean a lot.

I want my friends to understand that being “sick of politics” is privilege in action. Your privilege allows you to live a non-political existence. Your wealth, your race, your abilities or your gender allows you to live a life in which you likely will not be a target of bigotry, attacks, deportation, or genocide. You don’t want to get political, you don’t want to fight because your life and safety are not at stake.

It’s hard and exhausting to bring up issues of oppression (aka “get political”). The fighting is tiring. I get it. Self-care is essential. But if you find politics annoying and you just want everyone to be nice, please know that people are literally fighting for their lives and safety. You might not see it, but that’s what privilege does.

- Kristen Tea

(Source)

!!!!!!!!!important!!!!!!!!!!!

“Dance of the Witches in Front of Chicago Federal Building, Oct. 31 1969.”

Discovered this amazing feminist group called, “Women’s International Terrorist Conspiracy from Hell” or shortly entitled, “W.I.T.C.H” while reading about the Weathermen the other day. They mixed street theater and protests which usually included witch costumes and chanting hexes. 

I’m really surprised Tumblr doesn’t talk about this group more so you can read a little bit more HERE

“WITCH lives and laughs in every woman.  She is the free part of each of us, beneath the shy smiles, the acquiescence to absurd male domination, the make-up or flesh-suffocating clothes our sick society demands.  There is no “joining” WITCH.  If you are a woman and dare to look within yourself, you are a WITCH.  You make your own rules.”

What a time to be alive. 

huffingtonpost.com
50 Groups To Learn About If You’re Committed To Intersectional Feminism
Lookin' at you, first-time marchers.

In order to keep the momentum going, it’s integral that those who showed up to the Women’s March ― I’m looking at your newbie activists and first-time marchers (cis, straight, white women especially) ― get involved in other social justice issues. Issues like violence against women, reproductive rights, pay equality and body image are all at the center of the feminist movement (and, if you need to learn more about them ― I urge you to do so).

But, there are so many other social justice issues that make up a large and fundamental part of the feminist movement.

Black Lives Matter, LGBTQIA issues, climate change, freedom of religion: These issues and the communities they affect are all part of the feminist cause ― and we need to show up for them the way they showed up for the Women’s March.

As we head into the next four years, we all need to remember that the feminist movement is an intersectional one. Black Lives Matter, LGBTQIA rights, immigrant rights, climate change, rights of indigenous people, sex workers’ rights, disability rights, combatting islamophobia and gun violence ― these are all feminist issues.  

50 groups to learn about if you’re committed to intersectional feminism

What other groups would you add to the list?

Radical feminists and social justice warriors and women like Lena Dunham and Amy Schumer and other extreme feminist groups don’t represent feminism.

But some boys and men who treat women badly represent all boys and men everywhere.

Because double standards don’t exist.

You want to group abusers and rapists and murderers and other bad people in with good people just because they share a gender? Even though both genders can do these things? But you don’t want people to make generalizations about you because of your gender. Okay. That seems really fair guys, I’m so proud of you.

4

[warning for old-school trans terminology and rhetoric, transmisogyny, slurs, and mentions of violence and rape]

this is the article roycevomit discovered; i managed to track it down in the local university library and use their scanner.  bear with me, the text is a little long, but it’s also very interesting and at times a little too close to home.  obviously i don’t agree with everything it says, but i think it’s an important part of our history.

Beyond Two-Genderism
Notes of a Radical Transsexual
by Margo
published in The Second Wave Vol 2.4 (1972)

Over the past few years, both the feminist and gay movements have been challenging some basic assumptions about human sexual identity and expression.  There is a growing group of people who refuse to see women as inferior to men, and who also refuse to see love between people of the same sex as inferior or less “moral” than love between people of different sexes.  More and more questions are being asked about sex roles and relationships, ranging from why there is not equal pay for equal work to why a fulfilling sexual experience cannot involve less or more than two people.  In brief, the feminist movement has challenged male chauvinism, and the gay movement has challenged heterosexual chauvinism.  Of course, these are not separate issues.  As one who views herself as a feminist bisexual woman, I think and feel them to be very intimately related indeed.

Two-Genderism: Unfinished Business

However, if I am to find a life as a full human being, I must challenge yet a third aspect of sexism which has not yet been challenged, at least not on a large scale.  I call this aspect two-genderism, a rather clumsy term upon which I hope someone will improve.

Two-genderism can be summed up in the following assumptions: (1) human beings are divided into two distinct and mutually exclusive biological pigeonholes, male and female, (2) human beings are divided into two distinct and mutually exclusive psychological and social pigeonholes, men and women; (3) biological sex, subjective identity, and social assignment always coincide, and (4) none of these facts can change as a person grows and develops.

Perhaps these assumptions become clearer when we see exactly who gets hurt by them.  While it is true that everyone is affected to some extent, and that without these assumptions it would be much harder to maintain or justify a sexist society, still there are two overlapping groups that are particularly damaged by two-genderism.  First, there are intersexuals, people who combine some elements of both sexes in their bodies.  Secondly, there are transsexuals, people who develop gender identities which are preponderantly opposite to the ones which society demands.

Most transsexuals have perfectly “normal” female or male bodies, as the case may be.  Most intersexuals tend to adopt whatever sex they are reared to be, no matter how confusing from a two-sex viewpoint their biological condition is.  And there are some people who combine aspects of both these groups.  I am one of them.

A Personal Account

As I have learned from the feminist and gay movements, theory is not enough.  Now women are beginning to feel free to discuss their rapes without shame or euphemism, and gay people openly discuss the joys and terrors of coming out.  In the same way, I feel that an account of my past may give a better picture of what two-genderism means.

I am a genitally male person who has wanted to be female since about the age of four and a half.  I have some female breast development and gonads which produce virtually no sperm for a reason which has not yet been medically determined.  At present, I am taking female hormones and look forward to eventual sex reassignment surgery to make me as biologically female as possible.  At the same time, I must admit that 21 years of living as a male, however unrelished a role it has been, has made my sense of femaleness different than it is for someone born into that status.

Rather than write an autobiographical case history, I would like to relate moments which may give a better feeling of what my transsexuality has meant in my life.  My technique is borrowed directly from an article entitled “Barbaric Rituals,” which is in Sisterhood is Powerful.

Excerpts From A Diary

I am walking around in male clothing, and a child refers to me as a “funny-looking lady."  Teenagers ask me if I am a boy or a girl.  I am not sure if they are affirming my female identity or merely considering me as a hippy.  I think of many replies, respond with silence, and walk on.

In a crowd watching a building a building demolition (do I see the bring-down of a sixteen-story building as symbolic transsexuality?), being asked by some teenage boys if I use silicone, and being warned by a hardhat not to lift my sweatshirt lest I be "lewd and luscious."  Being told by one boy that I would probably be busted for "impersonating a chick” even though I am in male attire.

Being told by a feminist friend that I am masculine in being more idea-oriented than people-oriented, and wondering when people would ever give me a chance to be my real self to them.

Openly cross-dressing, wearing women’s clothing to a university campus, and being correctly associated with the gay movement but incorrectly identified as a male homosexual rather than as what I consider myself, a female bisexual.

Being called a faggot by some fraternity types at school.  The humor was that a faggot is the derogatory term for a male who enjoys sleeping with males, while I was and am in a situation where I can go to bed only with myself.

Finding some genuine beauty and humanness in my own subjectively female sexuality, in spite of all the confusion and ambivalence, but being unable to express a shadow of it to anyone else.

Talking to a friendly gay male who tells me, “I’m a very tolerant faggot, but I can’t understand you.  You’ve gone three steps beyond me and another two in reverse.”

Talking to a gay sister who can understand me as a “cross-gender Lesbian” but cannot understand why I find myself talking in a very different tone of voice, an affirmation of my emerging identity.

Being excluded from feminist groups because of my genitals and required male social role, and being excluded from male society because of almost everything else.

Talking with some genuinely kind organizers of a women’s center at my undergraduate school who has tried to comfort me by telling me that what with nonsexist child rearing I should have company in fifteen or twenty years.

After a demonstration against fraternity prostitution, going to a local newspaper and saying “Women’s liberation frees men too,” rather than, “I am what i feel, a woman who supports both her sisters and her brothers in ending dehumanization.”

Going to a campus meeting for a feminist organization where it is proposed to hold a women’s party, hearing that there can also be a men’s party, and realizing that I can fit into neither; going outside and having a good cry.

Having a radical male friend question whether my transsexuality is a personal distraction from “worthwhile” political work because “how many transsexuals are there, anyway?”

Leaving early from a radical literature distribution meeting and hearing that I had missed an excellent discussion of the unity of the personal and the political.  Later the same night being asked, at a party of the same people, not to discuss my intersexuality since I might be overheard.  Knowing that natural-born women could discuss birth control or abortion at this party without fear.

Telling myself that I am where a female was in 1950 or a gay person in 1960.  Then thinking about a woman or gay person raped, murdered, or driven to suicide, and feeling guilty fro playing the game of “more oppressed than thou.”

Reading about a woman’s project in Vietnam, and getting my priorities straight by hoping that the war will be over before I will be eligible to join.

Wondering if I will ever be able to pass as a female, and deciding that if not, I would rather live in a body and wear clothes that I can enjoy, even if it is on a desert island.

Reading feminist literature which claims that “men sure of their masculinity support equality” and gay literature which says that those who cross-identify or cross-dress are expressing masochism, are a small minority of the upright homophile world, and should not make you doubt that “you can be gay and normal too."  As a Lesbian who considers female transsexuals her sisters, experiencing the special pain of seeing these people apologized for and put down.

Arranging for hormone tests, and wondering what they can really prove.  Realizing that to learn I "really” have breasts, that I “really” am partly female, would make me feel much more legitimate.

Enjoying medieval music, which has scales in between major and minor.  Reflecting that even in classical music you are permitted to modulate, to change key.

Conclusion

This article is intended neither as a scholarly discussion of transsexual and intersexual states nor as a blueprint for ideal societies.  There are a number of articles now available on transsexuals and intersexuals, although many have a sexist bias.  As far as utopias are concerned, many anti-sexist people have shown a great interest in writing about androgynous societies yet small tolerance for actual androgynous people.  I can, however, make some suggestions to both the feminist and gay movements.

To The Feminist Movement:

1.  Do not assume that people who are confident about their sexual identities are for equality.  many people are either confident sexists or unsure people who question the old givens.  It is also an insult to all who do not fit the stereotype of a confident person of any sex.

2.  Understand that because of psychological and social pressures many transsexuals seek extreme versions of their desired sex roles.  Feminism can best reach these people by example and by understanding the uncertainty which sex identity shift can bring and which extreme role-playing can mark.

3.  In writing, recognize that there are intersexuals and transsexuals who may be trapped in a no-person’s-land and who need solidarity from anti-sexist people.  Literature which insists that there are only women and men is conspiring unconsciously with sexist forces to crush those in between.

4.  In exclusively female groups, redefine what it means to be female so that male transsexuals may have at least partial membership before surgery.  It is just at this transitional point, when the transsexual is beginning to live in her new identity, that communication with wher sisters may be important in shaping her life-style and in getting a wider perspective on what it means to be a woman.

5.  Become involved in current gender research and treatment programs so that the feminist view may be represented.

To The Gay Movement:

1.  Do not put down transsexuals, intersexuals, or other unusual people (e.g., transvestites) for apologize or express condescending pity for them.

2.  Explain that gay people are those who wish to love a member of their own sex, while transsexuals wish to change sex.  This is the difference between sexual preference and gender identity, and it should be known in order to confront the confusion and needless conflict between transsexuals and gay people.

3.  Recognize that some female transsexuals will have male homosexual feelings and some male transsexuals will have female homosexual feelings.  Such people should be welcomed to their respective groups.

In general:

Although transsexuals and intersexuals can organize themselves, they cannot make progress without help since they are such a small minority.  Recognizing the problems of intermediate people would be a humane step for anti-sexist groups and a move toward a freer view of sex and gender for everyone.  It would help bring to an end the two-genderism which is being challenged in genetic research but not yet in social reality.

I should say something about my obligations as a transsexual to the larger movement.  First of all, I feel committed to such issues as child-care and abortion, even though I shall never be able to bear or father a child.  I shall always try to be sensitive to the ways in which I have profited by male status, however much I have lost emotionally: for school and job simply being male was an automatic bonus.  Of course, I will be renouncing this status, but I cannot renounce the very unjust benefits I have received and which are now unerasable history.  I shall join with the Lesbian movement, while as a bisexual female I shall try to have the strict dichotomy between gay and straight removed (as Kate Millett has tried to do).  My main feeling is that I want to love human beings; sex and gender should not be determining factors.  At the same time, I do not put down those who happen to prefer one sex or the other.  It is a question of taste, becoming a problem when one taste is almost forced and another is repressed.


10

5 Women Artists—Archives Edition

Selections from the Getty Research Institute’s collections :

Barbara T. Smith—A performance- and installation-art pioneer. Her work explores concepts that strike at the core of human nature, including sexuality, spirituality, and death. 

The Guerrilla Girls—An anonymous feminist protest group that confronts discrimination against women artists and artists of color in the art world and tackles broader social issues. 

Harmony Hammond—A trailblazing feminist, lesbian, and queer artist whose work aims to “break down the distinctions between painting and sculpture, between art and women’s work, and between art in craft and craft in art.”

Marcia Tucker—An influential curator of painting and sculpture at the Whitney Museum of American Art and founder of the New Museum of Contemporary Art. At the New Museum she organized key exhibitions such as Bad Paintings (1978) and Bad Girls (1994)

Joanie 4 Jackie—A feminist video project started by filmmaker, artist, and writer Miranda July in 1995. These chain-letter videos, started during the Riot Grrrl movement, aimed to create a generation of female film makers in a pre-YouTube era. 

anonymous asked:

Can I get clarification? Am I automatically in the BS "white feminist" group just bc I'm white and feminist?

As a fellow feminist who is also white: 

First of all, white feminism is not BS. It’s a real problem.

Secondly, whether or not you participate in white feminism depends on how you do feminism. If white women are the only women you advocate for, ignoring WOC, then yes you’re a white feminist. 

As white women, even the most well-meaning of us will accidentally do white feminist things on occasion. Just like how all white people need to watch their words and actions to avoid racism, all feminists who are white need to watch to avoid white feminism. 

Mod Marie-Rose

Sign up to your local lesbian library today!

Who: We, the mods at butches and femmes, are hosting our third match making event in celebration of reaching 1000 followers, in which we aim to match up all our bookworm lesbians based on their literary tastes! We hope to build upon our past experiences in hosting these events to make this a fantastic experience for everyone

How: First, read the Terms and Conditions which can be viewed below and found on our about page. Then simply fill out the lesbian library card application below and copy it into our submission box. Please include as much detail as you can! We will match lesbians based on similarities in literary tastes and writer/reader aesthetics AND we will post a list of reading groups, again based on literary tastes and aesthetics so you can all hang out and fangirl over your particular interests together. Once we have posted the groups it’s up to you to get in contact with one another, although we will happily provide help, advice, prompts and other useful resources for you should you need them.

Where: the event will happen right here on this blog! Please don’t hesitate to ask if you have any questions or queries about the event and we will get back to you as soon as we can. Make sure to check back here for updates and announcements (we will be tagging any updates or information about the event with #lesbian library)

When: we will be accepting applications until 10:00pm April 21th 2017 GMT so make sure to send your form in before then. Pairs will be individually messaged the results and the reading group posts will go up on April 27th 2017 7:00pm (ish) GMT

Why: our intention is quite simply to help bookworm lesbians meet other bookworm lesbians (most of us being quite introverted) and hopefully find love and/or friendship. We do all the work for you!

Notes: The cover art used was created by mod w and the drawing is hers, although the photos used are public domain! Please, for the love of Patricia Highsmith, read our terms and conditions before submitting, thank you. Reblogs are appreciated.

Keep reading

I don’t want to be a quitter or whatever, obviously im a feminist and always will be, but it’s getting harder and harder to be able to engage in feminism on and offline. Like there’s more and more misogynists being welcomed in to feminist groups, more misogynist ideas being accepted, and more violence and threats against women being made, and women engaging in offline activism/groups, despite being visibly uncomfortable, in disagreement, or in fear, can’t say anything or else they risk possibly being assaulted, and are forced to either nod along or speak in whispers to other women who are also in fear. It’s not an accident that this is the direction feminism is heading in. 

anonymous asked:

Do you have any modern Nikolai head canons?

AYE AYE CAPTAIN (or should i say kapitan*)

- comes from old money (that’s an understatement lmao) and lives in a mansion
- but only bc that allows him to adopt a humble total of two dogs, three tabby cats and an actual literal fox
- alina laughs when he first tells her about the fox but then realization dawns on her and she knows he’s not joking
- names the fox sobachka bc he’s extra like that (also don’t worry all his pets get along!!)
- has his own boating business
- probably hires david to work for him bc if these two combined their brilliant minds together?? REVOLUTIONARY STUFF
- has a very expensive but refined taste and you’ll NEVER see or hear him boast about his finances but you can tell he has $$ in the way he carries himself
- LOVES EVERYTHING AND ANYTHING WITH PIRATES IN IT
- black sails is probably his favourite tv show ever and no one can convince me otherwise
- carries the goddamn lantsov emerald everywhere with him JUST IN CASE alina has an epiphany and says yes lmao
- which she never does bc she’s not the marrying type but they remain really good friends (after they date for awhile bc let’s be real that’s bound to happen)
- starts a lot of food discourses
- *calls alina at 3am* ‘would you rather eat a plate of herring or drink an entire bottle of kvas on an empty stomach?? also what do you think about the pineapple on pizza discourse’
- has a custom ringtone for all his friends
- has a lot of acquaintances but prefers to spend his birthdays with his closest friends a.k.a the grisha squad
- once, genya gave him a simple navy blue sweater with a hand-stitched crown embroidery on the front and it’s one of his most treasured clothing items ever
- probably spends a LOT of time on twitter/tumblr
- MEME KING
- develops a strong distaste for birthday cake but doesn’t mind regular sweets although he prefers salty snacks
- BUSINESS PARTNERS WITH INEJ ANYONE????? AND kaz bc let’s be real kaz couldn’t possibly turn a blind eye to a good bargainTM (or a company transaction) and they’re all up in each other’s business
- sobachka sleeps next to him like a plush toy while the dogs guard his door
- GREAT with animals in general
- claims he’s too busy for relationships and prefers casual hookups but one time he meets this handsome soft boy at a bar and alina literally starts crying when he tells her bc she’s so happy he’s finally found someone
- gives (a lot of) money to charity
- supports social clubs if they stand for something he believes in (so like feminist clubs/groups, anything that stands for class and gender equality)
- subscribed to ever gossip site out there bc a) D R A M A but also bc he likes to be informed
- king of throwing shade at people (esp if they’re ignorant and/or close-minded)
- probably invented call out culture
- slowly starts referring to kaz as ‘his son’
- sometimes, when he’s alone in his big ass mansion and no one’s watching, he puts on his old crown and takes out his dad’s old king cloak and dances in his underwear to ‘the show must go on’

10 Fascinating Facts about Virginia Woolf

1. While still in the nursery, she was nicknamed “The Goat.” Was it because of her long face?

2. For a time, Woolf wrote while standing at a desk 3’6″ tall because she wanted to be like a painter who could instantly step away from her canvas to get a better view.

3. Woolf first tried to kill herself at the age of 22 by jumping out of a window. The window she jumped from, however, was not high enough to cause serious harm.  Woolf once said that her death would be the “one experience I shall never describe.”

4. For a summer, she went mad believing that the birds were chirping in Greek and King Edward VII was uttering curses from behind nearby shrubbery.

5. For a time, Woolf considered marrying the British writer and fellow Bloomsbury Group-member Lytton Strachey, partially because he was a homosexual and she considered him more of a brother than a sexual partner. At the age of 27, Woolf admitted to being afraid of sex. Later on in life, she confessed to having a lesbian affair, after Virginia Woolf met fellow writer Vita Sackville-West in the early 1920s, the two women began a romantic affair that lasted for a number of years.Virginia and Vita first met at a dinner party in 1922. After learning that Vita was a writer, Virginia invited her to publish a novel with her small press, Hogarth Press. 

6. Woolf read and wrote compulsively to compensate for the fact that she lacked what she called “a real education,” meaning a university degree.

7. During the height of World War II, when it looked as if the Nazis would win, Woolf and her husband, Leonard, considered committing suicide via poisoning themselves with car exhaust. The couple kept a sufficient amount of petrol in their garage just in case.

8. Woolf struggled with anorexia, believing that her body was monstrous, and that her mouth and stomach were sordid in their demand for food.

9. Woolf spent three hours every day writing in a shed in the garden. She wrote Mrs. Dalloway in large notebooks that she hand bound herself through the printing press she ran with her husband, Leonard. The book was originally called The Hours.

10. Leonard, who was Jewish, was certainly in danger of being captured by the Nazis, and the couple’s London home had been destroyed during the Blitz. These seemingly insurmountable facts motivated Woolf’s decision to, on March 28, 1941, pull on her overcoat, walk out into the River Ouse and fill her pockets with stones. As she waded into the water, the stream took her with it. The authorities found her some three weeks later.

Virginia Woolf 25 January 1882 -  28 March 1941

Follow for more 1800s nostalgia.