Men are so often mocked for acting too much like women.
I remember the single act that really got me thinking about the quiet, engrained, and socially sanctioned sexism in our society was a man mocking his friends.

A man working at Home Depot saw some of his buddies working down a specific aisle and he called down to them in a ribbing and “I love ya so I’m going to insult you” manner, “hey ladies! Why don’t you get to work?!”.

He called them ladies. Like, a man being a lady implies he’s weak, slow, unable to work, and a whole host of negative imagery.

Another example I can think of I have personal experience in is during football season… A man I know calls the Vikings the “Viqueens” when they play his favorite team. Again, feminizing them in order to bring them shame and to show their inferiority.

No one uses being manly as an insult except when it’s being directed towards a woman to imply she’s not feminine enough to be pleasing to look at or trying to take a man’s place in whatever she’s doing.

Women in America undoubtedly have more opportunities and more rights than we ever have before. But it’s this undercurrent of thought that women and femininity is the lesser of things to be.
It is weak.
It is frail.
It is inferior.
It is subpar.

It is because men, and women too, are taught these things, not overtly… But very subtly, that women have less opportunity.
They don’t deserve harder jobs because they can’t really handle them.
They don’t deserve higher wages because they don’t do the job as well.
They don’t deserve my vote because they’re too emotional or irrational.
If they’re being strong or though it’s obviously an act/for show because women aren’t strong and tough.

Sexism isn’t always a slap on the ass by a stranger.
Sometimes, sexism is the worldview of those you love most.

reuters.com
Afghan women break ground with TV station launch
A new TV channel dedicated to women is set to begin broadcasting in Afghanistan, the first of its kind in a country whose media industry, like many areas of society, remains dominated by men.

“Zan TV (“Women’s TV”) launches on Sunday with a staff of all female presenters and producers, following a high-profile marketing campaign on billboards in Kabul and on social media.

Female newsreaders appear regularly on many Afghan channels, but an entire station for women is a novelty. Its arrival highlights the fact that behind the daily stories of violence, change is taking place in Afghanistan, even if it is often slow and patchy.

“I am so happy that this TV station has been created for women because there are women in our society who are not aware of their rights,” said 20-year-old Khatira Ahmadi, a producer at the station.

“So this station represents women and we work to raise the voice of women so they can defend their rights,” she said.”

Read the full piece and watch the video here

Ruby Payne-Scott (1912-1981) was the first female radio astronomer. She was a pioneer of the field, one of the first scientists to consider the possibility of studying celestial objects through radio frequencies.

She studied at the University of Sydney, and later started working at the Cancer Research Laboratory of the institute. She made significant contributions to solar radio astronomy, and discovered Type I and Type II bursts. During World War II she performed top secret work, and was involved in the detection of aircraft through radar displays.