“I’m not like other girls”

Who are these “other girls”?

They’re straw women, they don’t exist

They’re caricatures, they’re stereotypes, they’re cartoons

They exist only in our heads

Real women are human beings and we have complex inner lives, just because another woman seems shallow doesn’t mean she isn’t thinking deeply about things. We’re all subjected to feminine socialization and she might just be dealing with that the best she can.

Women aren’t stereotypes and we aren’t empty headed fuck meat.

We’re human beings raised with femininity culture trying the best we can to navigate patriarchy.

Masculinity can be soft. Masculinity can be gentle. Masculinity can be whispers and shyness and pastel colours and flowers and all those things can be masculine if someone wants them to call them that. Masculinity and femininity are constructs - you don’t have to describe yourself or anything you like as either if you don’t want to. 

The woman who eschews femininity, who is content with her natural shape and size and smell, who is impatient with the lengthy rituals of femininity, is condemned by both sexes. To women, she is an uncomfortable reminder of the extent to which they have abandoned themselves to the demands of men. To men, she is a threatening warning that their domination is not total and that women still have the power to regain themselves. 

- Anne Summers, Damned Whores and God’s Police

Queenie Goldstein is so important.

Queenie Goldstein is the first female character I have seen that is both kick ass and shamelessly feminine.
I feel that in many movies and books with a female heroine, they are made to be hyper-masculine. The author or director spends a lot of time focusing on what makes her tougher than the rest: her ability to shoot, her incredible stamina, or her snarkiness towards authority and ability to “stick it to the man.” (Hunger Games, anyone?)
None of these things are bad things in the slightest, no, but these films and books tend to point fingers at femininity and show it as a sign of weakness which it most definitely is not!!
But look!!!!!!
Queenie Goldstein is the embodiment of all things feminine, domestic, sweet and soft spoken.
She is also a kick-ass, hardworking, indendent woman, and that’s fucking awesome.
On the surface, and this is probably because from a young age I was trained to make these assumptions about exceptionally feminine people, she seems very material. Provocative, flirty, soft spoken and almost frail. But!!!!!! dig deeper!!!!!!!!!!
She is a ridiculously powerful, powerful witch and a skilled Legilimens. The most skilled I have been able to find in any of the HP books by far which takes extensive training and concentration in order to do. Which helps her in her ability to read people and dig beyond the surface in order to help them in any way she can.
She was orphaned and still held a household together with ease and cared for her sister fiercely.
She singlehandedly snuck Jacob, Newt and Tina out of jail, but if anyone else had attempted to do it they would’ve been found out… Because she is also highly skilled at manipulation to achieve power. (Queenie=Slytherin?? Hell yes.) She bravely goes out to fight the Obscurial even though she may die, looks beyond what lies in Jacob’s physical features and loves him as a complete person regardless of the circumstances, and is all around a wonderfully kick ass, hard core, powerful, beautifully feminine girl hero. I love Queenie Goldstein. So so so much.

Lamb, P. F., & Veith, D. L. (1986). Romantic myth, transcendence, and Star Trek zines. Erotic universe: Sexuality and fantastic literature, 235-55.

One of the earliest pieces of research published about fan fiction, Lamb and Veith’s essay is a first crack at answering the foundational question of fan studies: why do straight women read and write about men banging? Lamb and Veith focus their analysis on Kirk/Spock slash. They argue that in fan fiction, rather than being presented as masculine, both characters become androgynous by acquiring both typically masculine and typically feminine characteristics, which often complement each other. By removing gender differences from the equation, fan fiction writers are free to explore relationships which are genuinely equal and unencumbered by power dynamics.


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A table reproduced from Lamb and Veith’s essay outlining the different feminine and masculine characteristics given to Kirk and Spock in K/S fan fiction.

Kirk feminine qualities: Femininely “beautiful”; shorter, physically weaker; emotional; intuitive; sensuous, engages in much physical touching; verbal; evokes powerful emotional responses from others

Spock masculine qualities: Masculinely rugged; taller, more powerful; logical; rational; controlled, physically distant; reticent; keeps others at a distance

Kirk masculine qualities: Sexually ready at all times; is undisputed leader, initiator of action; is the “real” or “norm”, always at home; is fulfilled prior to Spock, only with acceptance of the bond is he firmly united with Spock; Spock complements his “at-homeness”; is sexually promiscuous (Spock assures his fidelity); is usually the seducer

Spock feminine qualities: Sexually controlled (except during his Vulcan mating cycle); needs to be led, follows Kirk into action; is the “alien” or “other”, always the “outsider”; is fulfilled only with Kirk; felt one-sided fidelity to Kirk even before the bond; needs Kirk for full identity; a virgin until marriage, he exhibits absolute monogamy after marriage; is usually seduced, but once unleashed his sexuality is very powerful