female comic book creators

Some of the most talented women in comics, on Tumblr and beyond, are joining us for a special Women’s History Month Issue Time. 

ASK OUR PANELISTS A QUESTION!

Maytal Gilboa is the founder and CEO of Emet Comics, a publishing company focused on empowering female comic book creators. In 2016 Emet Comics acquired Fresh Romance, a romance comic anthology from publisher Rosy Press.  Fresh Romance Volume 2 is currently in production and being crowdfunded through Kickstarter.  Prior to starting her publishing company, Maytal spent 4 years working as an executive at animation house, ReelFX Creative Studios, where she worked on films such as The Book of Life, and Freebirds.  Emet’s latest webcomic is Zana.

Sally Jane Thompson is an artist and writer whose work includes comics from Oni, Dark Horse, Image, Oxford University Press, The Phoenix and more, as well as live art, sketch reportage and illustration. She drew The Ruby Equation (with Sarah Kuhn, Savanna Ganucheau and Steve Wands) for Fresh Romance Vol 1, and is returning to the series to both write and draw Under the Oak Trees.

Born and raised in Chicago, Ashley A. Woods is an illustrator who got her start through self-publishing her action-fantasy comic series, “Millennia War”. January 2015, she met Amandla Stenberg and Stranger Comics at a convention; six months later, she began working on “NIOBE: She Is Life” which went on to sell tens of thousands of copies and inspired many cosplays.

Afua Richardson [ pronounced Ah FOO wah ] is an award winning American Comic-book illustrator best known for her work on Marvel’s Black Panther World of Wakanda. Some of her other works include Wildstorm, Attack on Titan, X-men 92, Captain Marvel, All Star Batman to name a few. Afua is also a musician, voice actor, activist and mentor. As a recipient of the Nina Simone award, she is aptly called a Jane of All trades.

Suzana Harcum and Owen White of the webcomic Tripping Over You are a two-person comics team currently based in Arizona. They are a married lesbian couple who once flirted with each other by creating characters and drawing together, and continue to make LGBTQ positive comics today for the love of writing stories together.

Our panelists will start responding on Monday 27 March

Some of the Philippines' most famous superheroes

Are DARNA, a  provincial girl who transforms into a warrior woman, based on the creator’s single mother (largely considered the Philippines’ greatest and central fictional superhero)–released in a time when everybody insisted that “a female comic book heroine won’t sell” (though the creator never gave up, considering the country itself a woman, and Darna its powerful and beautiful female spirit)

TRESE, a woman who is the head of their family and its responsibility over the streets of Manila and its supernatural relations (a mix of a supernatural crime boss and detective) whose fan following is enormous and growing and whose authority is unquestionable despite being the youngest of six living siblings and the only daughter 

ZSA-ZSA ZATURNNAH, a gay man and arguable transwoman (some gay men in the Philippines might in fact be transwomen who self-identify as gay men due to lack of knowledge about other genders, and Zsa-Zsa has expressed delight in being a woman) who, like Darna, can transform into a woman warrior and defend the world from outer threats while dealing with the more personal hardships of her everyday life as an effeminate gay man in a traditional Filipino community

and CAPTAIN BARBELL, a poor, disabled man who is abused by his siblings, who can transform into a strongman type hero who uses his powers for good and to help others in need like he was


So let me reiterate: The Philippines’ most famous comic book and TV show/film heroes are

A young girl, a woman, a gay man /  transwoman, and a disabled man. 

The only comics representation we really need is more people being interested in our comics, since our representation is a hundred tiers and dozens of years ahead of your average American brooding thirty something white man. 

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“At DC Entertainment, we talk frequently about how we heighten the presence of female storytellers and creators with our comic books — digital and physical. How do we bring the female characters to light more? More female characters are coming in both TV and film. It’s something we’re very conscious of. We have more work to do. But I think if we talk again in a couple of years, you’ll be pleased with the results. ” - Diane Nelson (DC Entertainment President)

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In which Amy Dallen and the creative minds behind Lumberjanes make friendship bracelets and talk about comics. <3 Pick it up tomorrow to support these amazing new comic creators! 

DC Comics Announces New Creator on Catwoman; Ups Female Creator Count Again

Three years ago this month DC Comics was being, rightfully, raked over the coals due to their lack of female creators in the launch of the new 52. The past week or so has DC expand the ranks of female writers to seven. Joining Gail Simone, Ann Nocenti and Amanda Conner and Marguerite Bennett who was previously announced as one of the co-writers on Earth 2: World’s End are Becky Cloonan, who was announced as the writer on the upcoming Gotham Academy, Meredith Finch, the new writer on Wonder Woman and today, novelist and i09 contributor Genevieve Valentine who will be taking over Catwoman in October (Nocenti is launching a new Klarion book). Here’s a look at the cover art by Jae Lee.

The book will focus on Catwoman reign as mob boss in Gotham.

The announcements are not over. Expect another one later this week that will bring a female artist to a familiar book.

anonymous asked:

If a female comic book creator sleeps with a comic book journalist and her book just happens to get better coverage than any others, would you be angered?

If a female comic book creator sleeps with anybody, what business is that of mine?

The man behind the most popular female comic book hero of all time, Wonder Woman, had a secret past. Creator William Moulton Marston, had a wife — and a mistress. He fathered children with each of them and they all secretly lived together in Rye, N.Y. And the best part? Marston was also the creator of the lie detector.

Harvard professor and New Yorker contributor Jill Lepore reveals this and other surprising details about Marston in the new book The Secret History of Wonder Woman.

“I got fascinated by this story because I’m a political historian and it seemed to me there was a really important political story that had been missed that’s basically as invisible as Wonder Woman’s jet,” Lepore tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross.

Marston, who was a famous psychologist, made up Woman Woman in 1941. He was interested in the women’s suffrage movement and in Margaret Sanger, the birth control and women’s rights activist — who was also his mistress’ aunt.

A feminist icon, Wonder Woman was an Amazon woman who forces people to tell the truth with her magic lasso. She was a controversial figure in the 1940s because of her overt sexuality and her link to bondage. Her costume was inspired by Marston’s interest in erotic pin-up art.

“There’s no simple story here,” Lepore says. “There are a lot of people who get very upset at what Marston was doing … ‘Is this a feminist project that’s supposed to help girls decide to go to college and have careers or is this just like soft porn?’”

The full interview: 

The Man Behind Wonder Woman Was Inspired By Both Suffragists And Centerfolds

Photo via Retronaut

fantastica-sff  asked:

Re: the recent question about "taking away toys" you just answered - the guy's been spamming female comic book creators with that question (the ones I know of, outside of you, are Kate Leth, Noelle Stevenson and Gail Simone). His entire Tumblr page is literally just reblogs of their answers to that question. I think he's trolling all of you.

“Trolling,” “providing a convenient straw man.”

Potato, potato.

Looks pretty win-win from here.