feline,

anonymous asked:

I loved reading your reply about spaying and neutering in dogs. I was wondering if you could talk about the pros and cons for cats.

The age of desexing cats is not discussed as much because there is far less controversy compared to dogs. Cats are already very long lived and are prone to less variety of cancers compared to dog breeds.

The benefits of desexing female cats are:

  • Population control
  • Uterine infection prevention
  • Mammary cancer prevention
  • Prevents undesirable or distressing oestrus behaviour (eg screaming like they have a broken back)
  • Less attractive to tom cats (as in, neighborhood toms wont come to your house and piss on everything. Your cat will still be as lovely as she always was.)

The risks of desexing female cats are:

  • Weight gain.
  • Conditions associated with weight gain.

The benefits of desexing male cats are:

  • Less desire to roam (and be hit by car)
  • Less offensive smell
  • Less urine marking
  • Less likely to fight (and get associated FIV infection)

The risks of desexing male cats are:

  • Weight gain
  • Conditions associated with weight gain, including urinary blockage.

It used to be thought that desexing male cats to early would result in an underdeveloped penis and higher risk of urethral blockage. This hasn’t proved to be the case, and we have large numbers of cats in long term studies that have been desexed at the youngest possible age (1kg bodyweight, usually under 12 weeks) and the risk of urethral blockage correlated with weight gain and inactivity, not age of desexing. The same is true of UTIs and FLUTD in female cats.

Accidental pregnancy is a major concern in managing cat populations, even now. There are so many people who still simply don’t do it. It’s maddening.

So desex your cats. We still need a strong message going out to the public for population control, because there are always more kittens than there are homes every year.

Cats do not have the same risk factors in juvenile desexing that dogs might (size and breed dependent) so desexing at 6 months (or earlier, some go through puberty at 4 but from 8 weeks still seems to be no greater risk) is fine. Younger animals also tend to have shorter surgery time, and seem to recover quicker.

The delayed desexing of dogs post is here.

FUN TRIVIA FACT

Other than the plated scales, tough leathery skin, frilled head, horned skull anatomy and sinuous tail, mythological and folkloric dragons have very little in common anatomically with actual reptiles. They have MORE in common with the Felidae genus (cat family) and the Aves Phylum Chordata (bird classification).

Like a cat’s eye, a dragon’s eye has a comparatively large iris with a vertical pupil. This arrangement allows the pupil to open extremely wide and receive
more light than that of a human eye.

A dragon’s legs are also decidedly nonreptilian, despite the scaly coverings. A dragon’s legs are positioned more or less directly under its body, in the manner of mammals. (Most reptiles’ legs tend to splay out to the sides, offering
much less support and mobility than a mammal).

Lasly, a dragon’s four feet very closely resemble those of a great bird. Each foot has three or four clawed toes facing forward (the number varies, even among dragons of the same kind), plus an additional toe, also with a claw, set farther back on the foot and facing slightly inward toward the dragon’s body, like a human’s thumb.


A dragon’s resemblance to a reptile is literally only skin deep  So the next time someone you know refers to mythical dragons as giant lizards, you’ll have the know-what to save a life.

instagram

natgeo Video by @bertiegregory. A female leopard and her little cub relax in a dried up river bed in the Sabi Sands, South Africa. Leopard cubs are born blind and start to develop sight after 10 days. Cubs will stay then stay with their mothers until they’re around 2 years old. Follow @bertiegregory for more wildlife adventures!

Signs as Cats

(Guys I’m so freaking sorry exams have been getting to my head and I’m becoming more forgetful every day…)

Aries: Mark every square inch of the house as theirs

Taurus: High on catnip

Gemini: Curling up on their human’s lap while watching big cat documentaries

Cancer: Sunbathes and attempts to ignore the birds cheeping outside

Leo: Investigates all water bodies suspiciously

Virgo: Silently judges people who walk past their window

Libra: Mmmm yes scratching post

Scorpio: Secretly wishes they could strangle the neighbour’s dog

Sagittarius: Gone all day, up all night

Capricorn: Acts like a dog and loves walks and balls

Aquarius: Has figured out access to the kibble cupboard

Pisces: Knocking down vases but oh how can anyone resist those adorable eyes?