feed bird

The place they take the pic was in mojiko “ Fukuoka it’s was during their tour

Remember when jm post a video of him feeding the birds?

It was in here

The Port of Moji, Mojiko, is remembered in history for its once-flourishing international trade. The nostalgic air of the rows of buildings give the whole town a romantic atmosphere. At the Mojiko Retro Observation Room, one can enjoy a bird’s eye view of the whole Kanmon Strait area from approximately 100 meters high. A variety of restaurants and souvenir shops are also located here to add to your shopping and dinning experience. The illumination of the night view add more to the romance

10

Jaguarundi

The jaguarundi (Puma yagouaroundi) or eyra cat is a small wild cat native to southern North America and South America. The jaguarundi has short legs, an elongated body, and a long tail. It has a total length of 21 to 30 inches with the tail taking 12-to-24 inches of that length, and weighs 7.7 to 20.1 pounds. The coat can be either blackish to brownish-grey (grey phase) or foxy red to chestnut (red phase); individuals of both phases can be born in the same litter. The two color phases were once thought to represent two distinct species: the grey one called jaguarundi, and the red one called eyra. The jaguarundi is closely related to the much larger and heavier cougar, having a similar genetic structure and chromosome count. 

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anonymous asked:

Hello! I recently discovered this blog and have spent hours looking over your amazing art! I know you're very busy but do you think you could draw human tfp soundwave one more time ? Doing soundwave stuff ?He's my favorite and your style makes me love him 10000x more!! (Your laser beak is amazing btw)

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Things People Don’t Tell You about Pet Birds

Here’s a list of things nobody told me before I got my bird.  You’re welcome to fact check and add your own experiences!  I hope this helps someone!

Possibly disturbing images of animal neglect below.

NEVER get a pet bird who lives alone a mirror for their cage.  They can choose their own reflection as a mate, which needless to say isn’t healthy and can be extremely sexually frustrating.  It’s much healthier to get even small birds foraging toys to entertain them.

BAD!

GOOD!

ALL birds need lots of social interaction if they’re going to remain mentally healthy!  This is especially important for birds that live in large groups in the wild like cockatoos, finches, and parakeets, but also true for “loner” birds like Senegals and African Greys.  Without the proper social interactions (hours a day with people or other birds) birds can get bored and pick up destructive habits like feather pulling, biting, and screaming, and even develop mental illnesses like depression or anxiety.  Yes, even parakeets.

Feather pulling removes a bird’s main way of staying warm, which can lead to life threatening things like hypothermia.

Parrot’s body temperatures are around 103 degrees Fahrenheit, much higher than humans, and largely thermoregulate through their feet.  Because of that and their small body size, they can get hyper or hypothermia fairly easily when compared to humans.  In hot months it’s important to provide them with a shallow dish of water they can cool off in, and in cold months, a heating pad or perch they can sit on to keep warm.  Parrots do best in a stable, relatively warm environment; while they can take slight changes, drastic changes in temperature can be very detrimental. Non-tropical/arid birds are a bit different from what I hear, so can’t really talk about them.

Parrot beaks constantly grow, so it’s important to provide lots of chewing fodder (I like to call them sacrifices) for your parrot to chew on or get their beaks trimmed by a professional.  

These can be hard calcium treats, wood, and other natural materials.  Some can be plastic but I wouldn’t recommend those as they can be swallowed and impede digestion or become a choking hazard.

Birds are prey animals!  They’re typically very nervous because they’ve been hardwired for centuries to be on the lookout for things that want to eat them.  They’ll get nervous around new things, strange noises, and new people.  They can learn to overcome some fears by careful desensitization, lots of social interaction, and a calm, careful owner.  It’s VERY important to keep them away from predatory animals (dogs, cats, etc.), as it can cause unnecessary stress on the animals.  If they absolutely have to interact, do so in a controlled environment and with one or both in separate carriers, cages, or pens.  Know your animals, pay careful attention to their body language, and be prepared to step in if either looks stressed or aggressive.

My parrot Apollo meeting my friend’s cat, the right way.

Just like humans, birds have dietary needs that must be met if they’re to remain healthy.  A few of the most important are Vitamin D (sunlight!), calcium (especially important in hens), and protein (required to grow healthy beaks, claws, and feathers).  The easiest ways to take care of the first two is to provide your bird with lots of sunlight (direct or indirect depends on the bird) and a constant supply of cuttlebones or calcium treats.  There are several different diet plans out there for all kinds of birds, but all agree that birds CANNOT live off nothing but seeds.  This can cause fatty liver disease and early death, even in otherwise healthy birds.  All parrots are usually fed a diet of pellets, fruits, and vegetables, but the ratios really depend on who you ask.

Here’s a few food pyramids for parrots:

Birds absolutely CANNOT be fed:

  • Avocados
  • Caffeine
  • Chocolate
  • Any greasy, salty chips/popcorn or any processed “human food” 
  • Dairy
  • Alcohol (I shouldn’t have to say this)
  • Apple seeds
  • Feel free to add on

Before you feed your bird ANYTHING, please look it up and make sure it’s safe!

2

Why don’t i like using plastic containers for caged birds?
I hope the picture comparison is an obvious reason why.

As you can tell from the picture on the left, there is a clear, clean surface on the plastic. This is a new container.

The picture on the right shows a lining that makes the plastic container look cloudy, and have a whitish tinge called bio film.
This container is roughly 4 months old.
That lining is a major health hazard for your bird as it is full of bacterial growth.
Even after scrubbing and cleaning once daily, the bacteria still grows over time and can cause upsets with digestion as the bacteria enters from the water/food into the body causing a bacteria infection and most likely a trip to the vet.

Plastic surfaces are porous, a breeding ground trapping bacteria.
To keep a plastic container clean, soaking and through scrubbing in soapy hot water is the only way. Keeping them clean is certainly a challenge and don’t forget about getting those tight corners with a toothbrush.

This reason is why stainless steel and ceramic bowls are a better option for use as food containers - they are non porous.

Lou with his ceramic bowl

Louie has a cermaic bowl designed to hang in bird cages.
Providing the cage is spotless and clean enough to eat from the floor, you can use weighted ceramic bowls via placing them on ground level in a ‘no poop’ zone.
Placing a ‘dipping’ dish with water next to food will save your bird from climbing up and down to a from the water bowl.

Stainless steel bowls

Stainless steel bowls can come in hanging, screw on, or screw on coup holders.

*Important to note with metal bowls*
Do not use galvanised metal bowls as they are coated with zinc to provide a damage proof layer.
Zinc and Copper are heavy metal.
Heavy metals are toxic to birds

If they chew parts of metal cage wires, toys, bowls (even coins) made out of these materials, and the metal doesn’t pass throught the digestive tracts, the chewed pieces sit in their stomach toxins will leech in to the body.

Whatever you decide about which dishes you will use, before you give food or water to your birds, ask yourself, “Would I eat from this dish?”