federation court

Hawaii is the first state to take Donald Trump to court over new Muslim ban

  • Hawaii is the first state to file a lawsuit against President Donald Trump’s revised Muslim travel ban.
  • On Wednesday, Hawaii’s state attorneys requested an emergency order from the federal court in Honolulu in an attempt to halt Trump’s new executive order on immigration before it takes effect on March 16. 
  • The executive order, signed on Monday, would ban all refugees for 120 days and ban new visas from six Muslim-majority countries — Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen — for 90 days.
  • State attorneys argued that the order is unconstitutional and asked the court to halt the ban nationwide, the Huffington Post reported.
  • According to the Independent, the lawsuit claims the discriminatory order will hurt Hawaii’s tourism industry, students and Muslim population. Read more (3/9/17 11:50 AM)
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Trump’s new immigration executive order is still a Muslim ban and people are fighting back

  • On Monday, Trump signed a new executive order suspending refugees from entering the United States for 120 days and cutting its refugee admissions from Obama’s 110,000 to 50,000.
  • The order, which won’t take effect until March 16, also calls for a 90-day ban on any new visas from six majority-Muslim countries: Iran, Libya, Syria, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen. Iraq is no longer included.
  • The revised order comes after federal courts handed the Trump administration several defeats
  • Despite the order’s new language, however, Muslims and non-Muslims alike are speaking out. 
  • This order is still a Muslim ban and people are taking to Twitter to warn others about the consequences. Read more (3/6/17 1:44 PM)

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State Department officers sign dissent memo against Donald Trump’s Muslim ban, report says

  • About 900 State Department officials have signed on to an internal “dissent memo” objecting to Trump’s immigration executive order.
  • “A senior State Department official confirmed that the memorandum in the department’s ‘dissent channel’ had been submitted to management,” Reuters reported Tuesday.
  • “White House spokesman Sean Spicer said on Monday he was aware of the memo but warned career diplomats that they should either ’get with the program or they can go,’” Reuters said. Read more

San Francisco is standing up to Trump’s order punishing  sanctuary cities

  • Dennis Herrera, city attorney of San Francisco, filed a lawsuit over Trump’s executive order that threatens to punish cities that shelter undocumented immigrants.
  • Herrera filed the lawsuit in federal court Tuesday arguing that the executive order, which seeks to withhold federal funding from cities that does not to detain undocumented immigrants, is illegal. 
  • Citing the 10th Amendment, which states powers not granted to the federal government are the purview of the states, Herrera contends that Trump does not have the authority to cut federal funds over a matter of state and local policy. Read more

Amnesty International: We will fight Donald Trump’s Muslim ban every step of the way

  • Amnesty International is no stranger to governments that exploit real threats to security to turn people against religious and ethnic minorities. 
  • We’ve seen this before and we know the havoc it wreaks. And we know it must be stopped. Read more (Opinion)

The words were those of Coretta Scott King, widow of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

But they resulted in a rarely invoked Senate rule being used to formally silence Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass.

On the Senate floor Tuesday, Warren began reading from a letter Scott King wrote in 1986 objecting to President Reagan’s ultimately unsuccessful nomination of then-U.S. Attorney Jeff Sessions to a federal district court seat.

Now-Sen. Sessions, R-Ala., is President Trump’s nominee for U.S. attorney general. Warren was speaking in the debate leading up to Sessions’ likely confirmation by the Senate Wednesday.

Republicans Vote To Silence Sen. Elizabeth Warren In Confirmation Debate

Photo: Pete Marovic/Bloomberg via Getty Images

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Despite the Trump administration’s latest contestation, the travel ban on people from majority Muslim nations is still illegal according to the latest ruling

The Trump administration requested a stay on Judge Robart’s block of the travel ban on Saturday night. Acting Solicitor General Noel Francisco argued against the temporary block claiming that Trump’s executive order is immune from judicial oversight. Buuuuut federal appeals court shut that down early on Sunday. Here’s what that means for Muslim travelers.

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More than 100,000 visas have been revoked because of Trump’s Muslim ban

  • More than 100,000 visas have been revoked because of Trump’s executive order banning the citizens of seven majority-Muslim countries
  • This means that far more people have been affected by the policy than Trump, or his administration, have been willing to admit.
  • Speaking in a Virginia federal court on Friday, an attorney for the U.S. government revealed the actual number — more than 100,000 visas have been revoked, the Washington Post reported. 
  • One reporter said that there was an “audible gasp” in the courtroom when the lawyer for the government gave the figure. Read more
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Native tribe files legal challenge to Dakota Access Pipeline

  • In a last-ditch effort to block construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, one of the Native American tribes directly affected by construction filed a legal challenge in a federal court on Thursday morning, according to the Associated Press.
  • The legal action follows news that acting Secretary of the Army Robert Speer ordered the United States Army Corps of Engineers to complete the $3.8 billion pipeline, despite mass protests from Native peoples whose land and water could be devastated by its construction. Read more

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02/10/17 - It felt good for Friday to come after a very long and busy week. I was scrambling around in court all morning. I had a couple of pleas in Federal Court, and a couple other clients in custody. I managed to finish in court by lunch and caught up on things in the office in the afternoon. I got my preorder of the new Weeknd album on vinyl, and bumped that at home. Steph and I ordered pizza from Rustic Slice and watched Silk, which is fantastic.

Trump has been sued more than Obama, Bush and Clinton combined since taking office

  • President Donald Trump has been sued 134 times in federal court since assuming the presidency in January, the Boston Globe reported Friday.
  • That’s nearly three times as many lawsuits as his three most recent predecessors combined, according to the Globe, and an average of more than one suit per day of his still-young presidency. Read more. (5/6/17, 12:53 PM)
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Black, Latino voter suppression in the US led to lower turnouts in 2016, report says

  • Voter turnout in the 2016 election was lower in states with racially targeted, suppressive voting laws such as strict photo ID requirements and advance registration cutoffs, according to a new national report.
  • The report, titled “America Goes to the Polls,” includes a ranking of all 50 states by turnout and shows Texas and Mississippi saw the largest drops in turnout or were ranked near the bottom.
  • Texas and Mississippi are notorious for adopting voter regulations that have been blocked in federal courts due to their discriminatory impact on blacks and Latinos
  • “We know that the Obama voters didn’t all turn out and that’s understandable — but I think that kind of drop [in turnout] is really due to the change in the law, the confusion around registration and the fact that a lot of voters don’t have the required ID,” George Pillsbury, senior consultant for Nonprofit VOTE and a primary author of the report, said in a phone interview. Read more (3/16/17 4:05 PM)

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BREAKING: ACLU takes Trump to court over Muslim refugee and immigrant ban, judge grants stay

  • The American Civil Liberties Union took the Trump administration to federal court Saturday night over its new restrictions on immigrants and refugees coming to the U.S. — a policy many have linked to President Donald Trump’s promised Muslim ban.
  • After about an hour of arguments in a New York City court, a judge granted a stay effectively blocking Trump’s executive order and barring customs officials from detaining immigrants and refugees at U.S. airports, according to Dale Ho, an ACLU representative. Read more
vox.com
A federal court just made a very big decision for gay rights. Seriously, it’s huge.
It’s the first federal appeals court decision to rule that anti-gay discrimination is banned under existing federal law.
By German Lopez

The ruling concludes that the Civil Rights Act of 1964 also protects workers from discrimination based on sexual orientation.

When the courts recognize your basic rights…

Originally posted by eatwithme75

Appeals court blocks Trump travel ban

A federal appeals court Thursday refused to let President Trump reinstitute a temporary ban on travelers from seven majority-Muslim nations, ruling that the president’s order violates the due process rights of people affected by the ban.

The quick decision from a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit could lead to a showdown at the Supreme Court, unless the administration agrees to dial back the travel ban or try its case before a federal judge in Seattle who ordered it stopped last week.

“Although courts owe considerable deference to the President’s policy determinations with respect to immigration and national security, it is beyond question that the federal judiciary retains the authority to adjudicate constitutional challenges to executive action,” the judge wrote in their opinion.

The ban, announced Jan. 27, temporarily barred citizens of Iraq, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen for 90 days, all refugees for 120 days, and Syrian citizens indefinitely. It led to chaos at U.S. and international airports as tens of thousands of visa holders were blocked from entering the country or detained after arriving in the U.S.

Read more. 

(Photo: JOHN G. MABANGLO, EPA)