federal wildlife service

Concerns for kingfisher delay Guam military buildup plan

HAGATNA, Guam (AP) — The final supplemental environmental impact statement for a military buildup on Guam has been promised for this summer, but concerns about the Micronesian kingfisher are delaying the report.

The Pacific Daily News reports (http://bit.ly/1Rf2SRf) that the federal Wildlife Service remains in talks with Pentagon representatives about how to assure habitat preservation.

The kingfisher population in Guam was federally listed as an endangered species in 1984, but by 1988 was close to becoming extinct. Although the bird is believed to be extinct in the wild on Guam, kingfishers are being cared for in captivity with a plan to reintroduce the birds to their habitat.

The Record of Decisions is expected June 26 and is said to be the last procedural step before construction projects to relocate about 5,000 Marines from Okinawa, Japan, to Guam can begin.

Groups urge more room for Yellowstone bison to roam, end to severe culling

Yellowstone National Park bison should be allowed to roam public lands in adjacent Montana without being marked for death to appease ranchers worried the animals will transmit the disease brucellosis to cattle, conservation groups said in a report released on Wednesday. The report by the National Parks Conservation Association, National Wildlife Federation and Wildlife Conservation Society comes after the National Park Service closed a public comment period on proposals to retool policies that have seen thousands of purebred buffalo from the nation’s last wild herd killed since 2000. The management plan crafted 15 years ago opens the way for bison that wander into Montana in winter searching for food to be killed to prevent transmission of brucellosis to a smattering of cow herds that graze in the region. http://dlvr.it/BFMTqm

Concerns for kingfisher delay Guam military buildup plan

HAGATNA, Guam (AP) — The final supplemental environmental impact statement for a military buildup on Guam has been promised for this summer, but concerns about the Micronesian kingfisher are delaying the report.

The Pacific Daily News reports (http://bit.ly/1Rf2SRf) that the federal Wildlife Service remains in talks with Pentagon representatives about how to assure habitat preservation.

The kingfisher population in Guam was federally listed as an endangered species in 1984, but by 1988 was close to becoming extinct. Although the bird is believed to be extinct in the wild on Guam, kingfishers are being cared for in captivity with a plan to reintroduce the birds to their habitat.

The Record of Decisions is expected June 26 and is said to be the last procedural step before construction projects to relocate about 5,000 Marines from Okinawa, Japan, to Guam can begin.