federal audit

npr.org
Trump Paid About $38 Million In Federal Taxes In 2005, Leaked Returns Say
A two-page portion of his return shows he earned about $150 million, and would have paid less in taxes, but for the alternative minimum. The White House said the returns were "illegally published."

Unlike other recent presidents, Trump has steadfastly refused to release his tax returns, saying he was under federal audit, which has led to enormous speculation about how much he really earns and where he gets his money.

The two-page return doesn’t really answer many questions, but does begin to shed a little light on Trump’s finances.

reuters.com
U.S. Army fudged its accounts by trillions of dollars, auditor finds
The United States Army’s finances are so jumbled it had to make trillions of dollars of improper accounting adjustments to create an illusion that its books are balanced.

The United States Army’s finances are so jumbled it had to make trillions of dollars of improper accounting adjustments to create an illusion that its books are balanced.

The Defense Department’s Inspector General, in a June report, said the Army made $2.8 trillion in wrongful adjustments to accounting entries in one quarter alone in 2015, and $6.5 trillion for the year. Yet the Army lacked receipts and invoices to support those numbers or simply made them up.

As a result, the Army’s financial statements for 2015 were “materially misstated,” the report concluded. The “forced” adjustments rendered the statements useless because “DoD and Army managers could not rely on the data in their accounting systems when making management and resource decisions.”

Disclosure of the Army’s manipulation of numbers is the latest example of the severe accounting problems plaguing the Defense Department for decades.

The report affirms a 2013 Reuters series revealing how the Defense Department falsified accounting on a large scale as it scrambled to close its books. As a result, there has been no way to know how the Defense Department – far and away the biggest chunk of Congress’ annual budget – spends the public’s money.

The new report focused on the Army’s General Fund, the bigger of its two main accounts, with assets of $282.6 billion in 2015. The Army lost or didn’t keep required data, and much of the data it had was inaccurate, the IG said.

“Where is the money going? Nobody knows,” said Franklin Spinney, a retired military analyst for the Pentagon and critic of Defense Department planning.

The significance of the accounting problem goes beyond mere concern for balancing books, Spinney said. Both presidential candidates have called for increasing defense spending amid current global tension.

An accurate accounting could reveal deeper problems in how the Defense Department spends its money. Its 2016 budget is $573 billion, more than half of the annual budget appropriated by Congress.

The Army account’s errors will likely carry consequences for the entire Defense Department.

Congress set a September 30, 2017 deadline for the department to be prepared to undergo an audit. The Army accounting problems raise doubts about whether it can meet the deadline – a black mark for Defense, as every other federal agency undergoes an audit annually.

For years, the Inspector General – the Defense Department’s official auditor – has inserted a disclaimer on all military annual reports. The accounting is so unreliable that “the basic financial statements may have undetected misstatements that are both material and pervasive.”

In an e-mailed statement, a spokesman said the Army “remains committed to asserting audit readiness” by the deadline and is taking steps to root out the problems.

The spokesman downplayed the significance of the improper changes, which he said net out to $62.4 billion. “Though there is a high number of adjustments, we believe the financial statement information is more accurate than implied in this report,” he said…

Some employees of the Defense Finance and Accounting Services (DFAS), which handles a wide range of Defense Department accounting services, referred sardonically to preparation of the Army’s year-end statements as “the grand plug,” Armstrong said. “Plug” is accounting jargon for inserting made-up numbers.

At first glance adjustments totaling trillions may seem impossible. The amounts dwarf the Defense Department’s entire budget. Making changes to one account also require making changes to multiple levels of sub-accounts, however. That created a domino effect where, essentially, falsifications kept falling down the line. In many instances this daisy-chain was repeated multiple times for the same accounting item.

The IG report also blamed DFAS, saying it too made unjustified changes to numbers. For example, two DFAS computer systems showed different values of supplies for missiles and ammunition, the report noted – but rather than solving the disparity, DFAS personnel inserted a false “correction” to make the numbers match.

DFAS also could not make accurate year-end Army financial statements because more than 16,000 financial data files had vanished from its computer system. Faulty computer programming and employees’ inability to detect the flaw were at fault, the IG said.

DFAS is studying the report “and has no comment at this time,” a spokesman said.

AFTER THE OLYMPICS:  Unfulfilled promises tarnish the “legacy”

The 2016 Rio Olympics were supposed to be the second of a one-two punch announcing Brazil’s arrival as a world power through dominance in sports. But in many ways, the opposite unfolded. Timed with an embarrassing political corruption scandal and the largest economic crisis in Brazil’s history, the hosting of the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Games has resulted in a perfect storm of unfulfilled promises.

While 15 of the original 27 venues have hosted some sort of event since the Games, others sit largely abandoned, their decay and disrepair a constant reminder of what was meant to be. Even the iconic soccer stadium, the Maracanã, has been vandalized, and had its power shut off completely after amassing a $950,000 electric bill.

Deodoro Olympic Park, long hailed by Brazilian politicians and Olympic proponents as a path to upgrade one of Rio’s poorer neighborhoods, is shuttered. The community pool that was supposed to come out of the canoe slalom course was closed in December and has yet to re-open. Brazil’s Federal Court of Audit (TCU) reported last week that another abandoned pool, at the Deodoro Aquatics Center, is now covered in bugs, mud and rodent feces. A Deodoro elevator once used to lift fans over a busy road now leads to nowhere.

Ten miles away at the Olympic Park, things aren’t much better. Earlier this month a fire from a flying lantern torched the roof of the Rio velodrome, badly damaging its Siberian Pine track. After the Games, the city solicited bids for private companies to run the park, but no one bid, leaving Brazil’s Ministry of Sport with the task – and expense. The maintenance alone will cost the government approximately $14 million this year. Rio’s new mayor, Marcelo Crivella, has scrapped plans to turn the handball arena into four public schools. And the 31 towers that made up the athletes village, which were set to be transformed into luxury condos, now sit largely vacant…

Read the full story in ESPN (10 August 2017)

Corrupt Senate Rejects Rand Paul’s Audit the Fed Bill

Even though it was supported by every Republican and even 100 Democrats in the House, the U.S. Senate blocked Rand Paul’s bill to audit the Federal Reserve.

Written by Andrew Taylor for ABC News:

The Senate on Tuesday blocked legislation calling for tougher audits of the Federal Reserve, rebuffing an attempt by Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul to give lawmakers greater oversight of the central bank’s moves on interest rates.

The 53-44 vote fell short of the threshold to overcome a Democratic filibuster. But the Kentucky Republican, who is seeking the GOP’s nomination for president, was joined by Democratic Sen. Bernie Sanders, a White House hopeful who occupies the opposite end of the political spectrum from Paul.

The measure calls for the Government Accountability Office, a watchdog agency for Congress, to scrutinize the Fed’s monetary policy and offer recommendations to lawmakers on ways to address any perceived problems.

Congress, the White House and Treasury officials have traditionally been careful to steer clear of questioning the Fed’s independence to set policy, and current law blocks the GAO from reviewing the way the agency conducts monetary policy or reviewing internal deliberations.

“Nowhere else but in Washington, D.C., would you find an institution with so much unchecked power,” Paul said. …

Supporters of the bill say that the Fed has kept interest rates artificially low for decades, punishing risk-averse savings, prompting businesses to hoard cash and fueled booms — and busts — in the housing and stock markets.

“The Federal Reserve has the ability to create new money and spend it on whatever financial assets it wants, whenever it wants, while giving the new money to whichever banks it wants,” Paul said. “Low-income workers do not get the luxury of receiving the Fed’s newly created money first, nor do they do have the luxury of receiving the near-zero interest rates that the wealthy do.”

anonymous asked:

Ok but really what has Rand Paul done to prove he would be a good president

You have to know I expected this.

Any more questions?

npr.org
Audits Of Some Medicare Advantage Plans Reveal Pervasive Overcharging
Federal audits of 37 Medicare Advantage health plans cited 35 for overbilling the government. Many plans, for example, claimed patients with depression or diabetes were sicker than they actually were.

More than three dozen just-released audits reveal how some private Medicare plans overcharged the government for the majority of elderly patients they treated, often by overstating the severity of certain medical conditions, such as diabetes and depression.

The Center for Public Integrity recently obtained, through a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit, the federal audits of 37 Medicare Advantage programs. These audits have never before been made public, and though they reveal overpayments from 2007 — money that has since been paid back — many plans are still appealing the findings.

Medicare Advantage is a privately run alternative to standard Medicare; it has been growing in popularity and now enrolls more than 17 million seniors. In 2014, Medicare paid the health plans more than $160 billion.

But there’s growing controversy over the accuracy of billings, which are based on a formula called a risk score; it is designed to pay Medicare Advantage plans higher rates for sicker patients and less for people in good health. In a series of articles published in 2014, the Center for Public Integrity reported that overspending tied to inflated risk scores has cost taxpayers tens of billions of dollars in recent years.

anonymous asked:

Y r u so obsessed with Rand Paul

anonymous asked:

So what are the good things about Bernie Sanders? (I just wanted a list of all the good things about him, so I could show someone it)

His main issues he is focusing on are:

Campaign finance: Limit corporate and interest-group spending in campaigns.

Sanders proposes a Constitutional amendmentthat would effectively reverse the Supreme Court’s Citizen United ruling and ban corporations and nonprofits from unlimited campaign expenditures. The independent senator would also require disclosure of any organizations spending $10,000 or more on an election-related campaign.

Climate change: Charge companies for carbon emissions

Considered to be a “climate change hawk,” Sanders argues that shifting global temperatures are a significant threat and caused by human activity. He has sponsored a bill which would charge companies for their carbon emissions and use some of the money raised to boost renewable energy technology.

Education: Two years free tuition at state colleges. Reform student loans.

Sanders would provide $18 billion to state governments to allow them to cut tuition at state colleges by 55 percent. And he would allow anyone paying off a student loan currently to refinance at a lower rate.

He also believes in ENDING standardized testing, and doing away with common core.

Federal Reserve and banks: Break up big banks. Open up the Fed.

Sanders would divide large banks into smaller entities and charge a new fee for high-risk investment practices, including credit default swaps. In addition, he believes the Federal Reserve is an opaque organization which gives too much support to large corporations. His pushed for a 2011 audit of the Fed and he would use the Fed to force banks into loaning more money to small businesses. Finally, he would ban financial industry executives from serving on the 12 regional boards of directors.

Guns: A mixed approach. No federal handgun waiting period. Some protection for gun manufacturers. Ban assault weapons.

In the House of Representatives, Sanders voted against the pro-gun-control Brady Bill, writing that he believes states, not the federal government, can handle waiting periodsfor handguns. Soon after, he voted yes for the 1994 Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act that included an assault weapons ban. He has voted to ban some lawsuits against gun manufacturers and for the Manchin-Toomey legislation expanding federal background checks.

Health care: Change to single-payer government-provided health care

Sanders voted for the Affordable Care Act, but believes that the new health care law did not go far enough. Instead, he espouses a single-payer system in which the federal and state governments would provide health care to all Americans. Participating states would be required to set up their own single-payer system and a national oversight board would establish an overall budget.

Immigration: Offer path to citizenship. Waive some deportations now.

Sanders generally agrees with President Obama that most of the undocumented immigrants in the country now should be given a path to citizenship. He voted for the senate immigration bill in 2013, which would have increased border security and issued a provisional immigrant status to millions of undocumented residents once some significant security metrics had been met. In addition, Sanders has supported President Obama’s use of executive orders to waive deportation for some groups of immigrants, including those who were brought to the United States as children.

Taxes: Raise some taxes on the wealthy. Cut taxes for middle and lower class.

The current ranking minority member on the Senate Budget Committee, Sanders wouldnearly double taxes on capital gains and dividends for the wealthiest two percent of Americans. In addition, this year Sanders asked President Obama to use executive action to close six tax deductions benefitting corporations and hedge funds. The Vermont senator would use some of the revenue gained from higher taxes on the rich to lower taxes for middle and lower class Americans.

Iraq, Islamic State and Afghanistan: Opposed the Iraq war. Calls for troop withdrawal as soon as possible.

A longtime anti-war activist, Sanders voted against the Iraq war resolution in 2002. He has regularly called for the U.S. to withdraw troops from Afghanistan and Iraq as soon as possible. Regarding the Islamic State, Sanders has said the U.S. should not lead the fight. In general, he believes the U.S. should focus less on international conflict and more on the domestic needs of the middle class.

A living wage (he did the following while he is senator): 

  • Proposed a national $15 per hour minimum wage.
  • Introduced a budget amendment to raise the minimum wage.
  • Introduced the “Workplace Democracy Act” to strengthen the role of unions and the voices of working people on the job.

Reforming Wall Street:

  • Introduced the “Too Big to Fail, Too Big to Exist Act,” which would break up the big banks and would prohibit any too-big-to-fail institutions from accessing the Federal Reserve’s discount facilities or using insured deposits for risky activities.
  • Led the fight in 1999 against repealing the Glass-Steagall provisions which prevented banks (especially “too big to fail” ones) from gambling with customers’ money; is a co-sponsor of the Elizabeth Warren/John McCain bill to reinstate those provisions.
  • Has proposed a financial transaction tax which will reduce risky and unproductive high-speed trading and other forms of Wall Street speculation; proceeds would be used to provide debt-free public college education.
  • Is co-sponsoring Sen. Tammy Baldwin’s bill to end Wall Street’s practice of paying big bonuses to bank executives who take senior-level government jobs.
  • Introduced a tax on Wall Street speculation to make public colleges and universities tuition-free
    Supports capping credit card interest rates at 15 percent.
  • Sponsored an amendment calling for an audit the Federal Reserve. The audit found that far more had been spent in the Wall Street bailout than previously disclosed, and that considerable funds had been spent to bail out foreign corporations.
  • Warned about the risks of deregulation eight years before the fiscal crisis of 2008.
  • Has proposed limiting the ability of bankers to get rich from taxpayer bailouts of their institutions

He also marched with Martin Luther King JR, and organized sit ins to protest against segregation.

OH! And he has supported equality, womens rights, and ending the war on drugs since before 1972!

Here are some of the star trek auditions the chat did during the star trek cards against the federation game

jim kirk singing Radioactive

Spock singing It’s not easy being green

Hi, i’m auditioning for the USS enterprise and i’ll be singing Titanium

Hi im auditioning for young jimmy kirk and i’ll be singing Hey Momma

Hi I’m auditioning for the role of Jim Kirk and I’ll be singing Teenage Wasteland

Hi, im auditioning for post STIII spock and i’ll be singing Somebody I used to know  

Hi im auditioning for young sam kirk and I’ll be singing Run boy run

hi im auditioning for the role of deforest kelley and i’ll be singing Put a ring on it (single ladies)

Hi I’m auditioning for a role in The Voyage Home and I’ll be singing Save the Whales

Hi I’m auditioning for the role of Spock and I’ll be singing Row Row Your Boat

hi im auditioning for governor kodos and i’ll be singing Do they know it’s christmas (feed the world)

Hi I’m auditioning for the role of Jim Kirk and I’ll be singing Chasing Cars

Hi I’ll be auditioning for the role of Leonard McCoy and I’ll be singing Them Bones

Hi I’m auditioning for the role of Jim Kirk and I’ll be singing Never Gonna Give You Up     

Hi I’ll be auditioning for the role of Nero and I’ll be singing Wrecking Ball

Hi I’m auditioning for the role of Montgomery Scott and I’ll be singing Scotland

Hi I’ll be auditioning for the role of Khan and I’ll be singing I Can Do Anything Better Than You 

Hi I’ll be auditioning for the role of Kevin Riley and I’ll be singing I’ll Take You Home Again, Kathleen

Hi i’ll be auditioning for post-radiation Kirk and I’ll be singing Bad Blood

anonymous asked:

Hey, so what makes Rand Paul so great? I know practically nothing about him. What are his stances on major issues?

I’ll give you a lighting round for Rand on the Issues.

  • Guns: Pro-second amendment
  • Taxes: Flat tax an low.
  • Privacy: Against warrant-less mass surveillance. Warrants must be specific to each individual and cannot apply to many people. The NSA needs more oversight.
  • War on Drugs: Reduce sentences for non-violent drug crime. Restore voting rights to non-violent felons who committed a drug crime. 
  • Audit the Federal Reserve.
  • Foreign Policy: Refrain from intervening in foreign conflicts but maintain a military that is focused on National Defense, not policing the world.
  • Same-Sex marriage: It’s not a decision for government. The GOP should “agree to disagree” and move on.
  • Supports a balanced budget amendment.
  • Pro-Life
  • Thinks Anime should be banned and anyone who views anime should be jailed

(I made that last one up)

2

government website intended to make federal spending more transparent was missing at least $619 billion from 302 federal programs, a government audit has found.

And the data that does exist is wildly inaccurate, according to the Government Accountability Office, which looked at 2012 spending data. Only 2% to 7% of spending data on USASpending.gov is “fully consistent with agencies’ records,” according to the report.

Among the data missing from the 6-year-old federal website:

• The Department of Health and Human Services failed to report nearly $544 billion, mostly in direct assistance programs like Medicare. The department admitted that it should have reported aggregate numbers of spending on those programs.

• The Department of the Interior did not report spending for 163 of its 265 assistance programs because, the department said, its accounting systems were not compatible with the data formats required by USASpending.gov. The result: $5.3 billion in spending missing from the website.

• The White House itself failed to report any of the programs it’s directly responsible for. At the Office of National Drug Control Policy, which is part of the White House, officials said they thought HHS was responsible for reporting their spending.

For more than 22% of federal awards, the spending website literally doesn’t know where the money went. The “place of performance” of federal contracts was most likely to be wrong.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2014/08/05/federal-spending-transparency-money-missing/13485581/