february chart

Trump uses the excuse of making the ban to protect from terrorism (a very broad, hateful incorrect generalization). Let’s set aside the terrorists that are home grown, and the ones from any other religion or region. This ban is still so very wrong. Trump even cites 9/11 attacks - but didn’t include the countries where the attackers originated in his ban. Not surprisingly, Trump has businesses in those countries.

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[VIDEO] 170222 Mamamoo wins 2016 Best Digital Artist for the Month of February @ Gaon Chart Music Award 

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On this day in music history: March 24, 1962 - “Twistin’ The Night Away” by Sam Cooke hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 2 weeks, also peaking at #9 on the Hot 100 on the same date. Written by Sam Cooke, it is the third chart topping single for the R&B and pop vocal icon from Clarksdale, MS. Making the move from independent label Keen Records to major player RCA Records in 1960, Sam Cooke doesn’t miss a beat in the transition, scoring a big hit with the classic “Chain Gang” (#2 R&B and Pop). Though with the exception of “Cupid” (#20 R&B, #17 Pop), Cooke hits a slump in 1961, when five of his singles chart poorly or not at all. Looking for something to pull himself out his chart stagnation, the singer turns to the latest pop cultural phenomenon for inspiration. A sensation in the US and worldwide since Chubby Checker emerges on the scene with “The Twist”, Checker’s record achieves the unheard of feat of topping the Billboard Hot 100 in two separate runs on the charts in September 1960 and January 1962. Also in late 1961, New Jersey based band Joey Dee And The Starliters are quickly moving up the charts with “Peppermint Twist Pt. 1”, which replaces “The Twist” at number one after its second time at the top. Cooke writes “Twistin’ The Night Away”, and plays the finished song for his producers Hugo Peretti and Luigi Creatore. Hugo and Luigi agree with Cooke that it’s a hit, and quickly move to record it. “Twistin’” is recorded at RCA Studios in Hollywood, CA on December 18, 1961, with members of the famed Wrecking Crew studio collective including arranger Rene Hall (Marvin Gaye), Earl Palmer (drums), Tommy Tedesco, Clifton White (guitars), Red Callender (bass), Ed Beal (piano), Jackie Kelso, John Ewing, Jewell Grant (saxophones) and Stuart Williamson (trumpet). Released on January 9, 1962, the song quickly demonstrates that Sam Cooke is far from over. Entering the Hot 100 at #70 on February 3, 1962 and #20 on the R&B singles chart on February 17, 1962, the single rises up both charts quickly. “Twistin’ The Night Away” becomes one of Sam Cooke’s most popular and beloved songs, later being featured in films like “Animal House”, “Innerspace” and “The Green Hornet”. Rod Stewart records the song for his album “Never A Dull Moment” in 1973, re-recording it for the soundtrack of “Innerspace”, appearing along side Cooke’s original version in the film. Drag performer and actor Divine also records a Hi-NRG dance version “Twistin’” in 1985.

Check out the awesomeness of my February Fitchart!!!

Fair to say this was a pretty good month for me:-

✅ I’m well and truly settled in to my low(er) carb, PCOS-friendly food plan.

✅ I’ve made some great progress on the weight loss front.

✅ Incidental exercise to get my step count up has become second nature for me.

✅ Yes, there was still chocolate to be consumed…but the days I had chocolate it was in moderation, and I’m ok with that. It’s about breaking the habit of mindless snacking, not depriving myself completely.

✅ Regardless of what I ate, I tracked my carb intake every. single. day. I have no doubt I prevented at least a few derailments by keeping to my “tracks carbs” target.

✅ #lassiethestaffy got lots and lots of walks 🐶🐶🐶

I’ll be keeping the same FitChart goals for March - they’re a good mix of healthy habits and daily reminders.

I’m so excited to see where I’ll be this time next month!!!

Not to be the bearer of bad news but

  • 10th of February: Dallas, TX, USA
  • 12th of February: Vancouver, Canada
  • 14th of February: LA, CA, USA
  • 17th of February: Gaon Chart Awards, South Korea (?!)
  • 19th of February: Chicago, Illinois, USA
  • 21st of February: New York City, New York, USA

Considering that Vancouver is right above Washington State, this makes the most geographic sense so they’ll just so SK to TX, northwest from TX to Vancouver, VC to LA and then have a MUCH shorter flight from LA to Seoul than anywhere else in the country, and more time to prepare for the awards show. 

(However, they’ll probably leave the awards show early :/ )

Anyways it takes $0.00 for ZYX’s studio to sync a Google calendar and avoid this much conflict 

Zayn Heading for No. 1 Debut on Billboard 200 Albums Chart With ‘Mind of Mine’

Zayn’s debut solo album, Mind of Mine, is heading for a No. 1 bow atop the Billboard 200 chart. Industry forecasters suggest the set, which was released on March 25 through RCA Records, could earn upwards of 160,000 equivalent album units in the week ending March 31. Of that sum, perhaps 120,000 could be pure album sales.

The Billboard 200 chart ranks the most popular albums of the week in the U.S. based on multi-metric consumption, which includes traditional album sales, track equivalent albums (TEA) and streaming equivalent albums (SEA). The new April 16-dated chart (where Zayn may open at No. 1) is scheduled to have its top 10 revealed on Sunday, April 3.

If Mind of Mine starts at No. 1, Zayn will succeed Gwen Stefani, who notched her first solo No. 1 album with This Is What the Truth Feels Like on the April 9-dated chart. Stefani, like Zayn, previously visited the No. 1 slot as part of a group: Stefani is the lead singer of the band No Doubt, which topped the chart with Tragic Kingdom. Zayn was formerly a member of the vocal group One Direction, which hit No. 1 with four albums (Up All Night, Take Me Home, Midnight Memories and Four) during his time with the act.

Mind of Mine was led by Zayn’s debut solo single “Pillowtalk,” which debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in February. The achievement made Zayn the first U.K. artist to debut at No. 1 on the Hot 100 with their first charted single.

Other albums on course for a high debut on the new Billboard 200 chart include K. Michelle’s More Issues Than Vogue (with around 50,000 units or so), Asking Alexandria’s The Black (30,000 units) and Young Thug’s Slime Season 3 (30,000 units).

BILLBOARD

Schedule 2/8-2/24

February 8th:

  • National Idol Singing Contest (Hoshi&DK) @ 5:10PM KST

February 9th:

  • Idol Sports Athletic Championships @ 5:55PM KST

February 10th:

  • Idol Sports Athletic Championships @ 5:55PM KST
  • Sukira (Seungkwan&DK) @ 11:00PM KST

February 13th:

  • Boys Wish Encore Concert @ 6:00PM KST

February 14th:

  • Boys Wish Encore Concert @ 5:00PM KST

February 15th:

  • Seventeen One Fine Day Premier @6:00PM KST 

February 17th:

  • Gaon Chart Kpop Awards @ 7:00PM KST
  • Sukira (Seungkwan&DK) @ 11:00PM KST

February 24th:

  • Sukira (Seungkwan&DK) @ 11:00PM KST

COMPLEX
00:0000:00
ON MY OWN

A YEAR AGO, ZAYN MALIK LEFT THE BIGGEST BOY BAND ON THE PLANET TO LAUNCH A SOLO CAREER. FREE FROM THE CREATIVE CONSTRAINTS OF ONE DIRECTION, HE’S READY TO MAKE HIS MARK ALONE.

INTERVIEW BY JOE LA PUMA
PHOTOGRAPHY BY NABIL
This feature appears in the Apr/May 2016 issue of Complex
It’s half past five on a balmy February afternoon in Beverly Hills, the time of day when the light streaks in horizontal, mingling with the smog into a dull, carroty glow that makes normal folks look beautiful, and beautiful folks look ethereal. Zayn Malik, 23 years old, slices through the glow and into his dressing room, the door of which is manned by a middle-aged bodyguard named Max. He’s finishing up a photo shoot at billionaire businessman James Goldstein’s mansion, a 4,500 square-foot architectural masterpiece built by John Lautner that’s made up of glass walls and poured concrete, and sits atop the Benedict Canyon enjoying the best views the city of Los Angeles has to offer. Millions of young people around the world define their lives around this man, so I’ll do it, too: We’re currently living in the Zayn A.D. era—after One Direction. Last March, Zayn announced his retirement from the group, making some off-handed statements to the press about refocusing on his private life. It was a move that launched a thousand hashtags and memes, instantly breaking the hearts of countless “Directioners,” but, for Zayn, it was necessary. Feeling creatively stifled, with indifference no longer an effective coping mechanism, he cut the cord and returned home, spending a few weeks with his mom and plotting his next move. A solo one.

Now it’s a year later. His first single, “Pillow Talk,” debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in February (topping the charts in 68 countries), knocking Justin Bieber from the top spot. This month sees the release of his first solo album, Mind of Mine, a body of work created, for the first time, on his terms, with none of the restrictions that come with being one-fifth of a boy band. We leave the mansion, and drive to his house in Bel Air. He’s bopping his head to the stereo, playing me candy-coated pop cuts off his new record, including an Usher-esque tune called “Drunk.” We park, and as we stroll into his house I almost trip over his heavyset orange rescue cat, named Garfield. We sit in his makeshift studio, flanked by bookshelves stacked with souvenirs from a life in the spotlight, including an early Iron Man issue marked “To Zayn, from Stan Lee,” and the hip-hop history book The Big Payback. Over the course of an hour, Zayn opens up about authenticity, handling the spotlight, and stepping out from behind One Direction’s shadow.



There was a lot of mystery around your new songs. How does it feel to have “Pillow Talk” finally released?

The whole process behind the album was short, but it felt like forever. I wrote all kinds of personal stuff. When I thought about the way that it sounded to me, it sounded great, and I listened to it over and over again. Then I went to a transitional phase where I realized, “Shit. Everybody else is going to listen to this as well.” So I had to think about it from that perspective. There was a lot of built-up anxiety to create this thing. You don’t really know what’s going to happen. So when that song went out, and I saw the reaction from the fans, that took a little weight off me for a bit. Obviously, there’s still a lot of pressure. I don’t want to be a one-hit wonder, so I’ve got a lot of work to do.

When did you feel confident? There had to be a time when you thought to yourself, “This shit is good.”

I don’t think I’m ever going to think like that. It’s just not in my character. I might be quietly confident within myself, but I could never be sure that everybody is going to enjoy it. Everybody is going to say something negative at some point. You’ve got to prepare yourself for that, I guess.

When it comes to pop music, authenticity is key. How much did you struggle with your own authenticity when you were part of One Direction?

That was something that was always underlying, and ended up as the main factor of me leaving in the end. It was about denying the authenticity of who I was, and what I enjoyed about music, and why I got into it. That was always there. It was one of the things that wasn’t going to go away, so I had to go away.

That must have been frustrating. Leaving the band, I imagine you thinking, “Hey, I’m rich and famous and this is my job. It could be much worse. But this isn’t who I am.”

Exactly. No one can ever say I was ungrateful, even though it sort of comes across that way when I mention that I was frustrated with the band. That’s not the case at all. That was just an experience that had to be dealt with at the time. With the music that I’m doing now, I get to express myself, and that creative tension is gone.

There’s a moment in the “You and I” video where you and the rest of One Direction are all wearing the same sweater, with your faces morphing into one another. That underscores the lack of an individual identity.

Well, that video had a very specific message behind it. We were trying to show that, regardless of the fact that we’re a group, we all have our own story to tell. In a sense, I understood what that was, and I can see how people can look at that and go, “They’re all five the same guy. They’re all wearing the same clothes. They’re all doing the same shit.” But that’s not what we were trying to show. There were certain restrictions in terms of the way that we could come outside of that young teen boy look.It’s half past five on a balmy February afternoon in Beverly Hills, the time of day when the light streaks in horizontal, mingling with the smog into a dull, carroty glow that makes normal folks look beautiful, and beautiful folks look ethereal. Zayn Malik, 23 years old, slices through the glow and into his dressing room, the door of which is manned by a middle-aged bodyguard named Max. He’s finishing up a photo shoot at billionaire businessman James Goldstein’s mansion, a 4,500 square-foot architectural masterpiece built by John Lautner that’s made up of glass walls and poured concrete, and sits atop the Benedict Canyon enjoying the best views the city of Los Angeles has to offer. Millions of young people around the world define their lives around this man, so I’ll do it, too: We’re currently living in the Zayn A.D. era—after One Direction. Last March, Zayn announced his retirement from the group, making some off-handed statements to the press about refocusing on his private life. It was a move that launched a thousand hashtags and memes, instantly breaking the hearts of countless “Directioners,” but, for Zayn, it was necessary. Feeling creatively stifled, with indifference no longer an effective coping mechanism, he cut the cord and returned home, spending a few weeks with his mom and plotting his next move. A solo one.

Now it’s a year later. His first single, “Pillow Talk,” debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in February (topping the charts in 68 countries), knocking Justin Bieber from the top spot. This month sees the release of his first solo album, Mind of Mine, a body of work created, for the first time, on his terms, with none of the restrictions that come with being one-fifth of a boy band. We leave the mansion, and drive to his house in Bel Air. He’s bopping his head to the stereo, playing me candy-coated pop cuts off his new record, including an Usher-esque tune called “Drunk.” We park, and as we stroll into his house I almost trip over his heavyset orange rescue cat, named Garfield. We sit in his makeshift studio, flanked by bookshelves stacked with souvenirs from a life in the spotlight, including an early Iron Man issue marked “To Zayn, from Stan Lee,” and the hip-hop history book The Big Payback. Over the course of an hour, Zayn opens up about authenticity, handling the spotlight, and stepping out from behind One Direction’s shadow.

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Dan and Phil Top Charts (February 2, 2014)

The Beatles in 1964: Never-Before Published Images

On February 1, 1964 The Beatles’ “I Want To Hold Your Hand” reached the top of the American pop charts. On February 2, I became a Beatlemaniac. In short order I acquired a Beatles’ haircut, pair of Beatle boots, a Beatles fan-club membership card, and a stack of Tiger Beat magazines with dozens of Beatles photographs. My single greatest ambition, to actually meet the Beatles and shake their hands, was never realized, so for much of the ‘60s I envied others who had the good fortune that was denied me.

Fifty years should be enough time to get over Beatlemania. But recently I was shown a collection of never-published Beatles photographs from 1964 by Arnold Schwartzman, a graphic designer and award-winning documentary film director, and it brought back all the bittersweet memories and emotions.

In 1959, as a young designer on staff at London’s Associated-Rediffusion TV network, Schwartzman designed the logo and opening title sequences for the successful weekly pop show “Ready, Steady Go!”, the British equivalent of American Bandstand (but much cooler). As its roving photographer, Schwartzman captured The Beatles, Rolling Stones, Dusty Springfield, The Kinks, James Brown, Peter, Paul & Mary, and others backstage and onstage. Presciently, he retained the negatives.

Read more. [Image: Arnold Schwartzman]

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140301 Germany's K-Pop Charts February 2014: "One Shot" #2 

CNBLUE Talks Maroon 5 Comparisons & Defining Their Sound at Debut NYC Show

The Korean rock band say their first solo U.S. show “is much more meaningful for us and for our fans.”

CNBLUE has all the qualities of your typical K-pop boy band: Charismatic, good-looking and talent in singing, acting, rapping, playing instruments and beyond.

But the quintet is far from a boy band. Most often compared to acts like Maroon 5 and Jason Mraz, CNBLUE – consisting of lead vocalist/guitarist Yonghwa, guitarist Jonghyun, drummer Minhyuk and bassist Junshin – is one of the few Korean rock bands that can compete with the idols on the K-Pop Hot 100. In fact, the guys earned their highest-charting entry yet on the K-Pop chart last February when their single “I’m Sorry” peaked at No. 2, spending five weeks inside the Top 10.

And their fans are just as dedicated as any boy band’s.

For the first time ever, CNBLUE brought its show to the East Coast with a performance at New York’s Best Buy Theater on Jan. 21. While the show was announced in December, no one could have predicted the fierce snowstorm would plague fans waiting in line from early hours of the morning to get the best spot in the general admission pit. The temperature refusing to rise above 14 degrees was a stat not lost on the band.

“We’re really worried about our fans who have been waiting since the wee hours of the morning outside,” Yonghwa, via translator, said to Billboard, the only media CNBLUE agreed to speak with before its New York debut. “We’ve dreamt of playing New York for a long time so we’re glad that it’s finally happening. Especially because it’s our first concert of 2014, we want to really go out, even if we faint, we really just want to give it our all… but even if only one fan came, we still would have done the show.”

And it’s that humble, dedicated mindset that has taken CNBLUE so far in the K-pop scene. 

Instead of being discovered by recruiters and trained by an entertainment agency, the members of CNBLUE sharpened their skills playing as street musicians in Japan and South Korea. Since its official 2009 debut, the group has steadily risen to be competitive with top Korean acts.

“Most of the K-pop groups are defined by dancing, showmanship and those kinds of things,” Yonghwa added. “But because we’re a band, we think it’s a great quality that all our performances are done live.”

Their unique qualities have transferred over to the Billboard charts. “Re:BLUE: CNBLUE 4th Mini Album” went to No. 1 on the World Albums chart in February andcharted on the Billboard Heatseekers Albums chart, meaning an entry on the Billboard 200 wasn’t far off. In fact, the guys chalk up their first American solo show to a result of their strong chart showing.

Read more here.

© Jeff Benjamin, Billboard