features intern

6

First Look: The Ferrari 812 Superfast

Ferrari has selected the 87th edition of the Geneva International Motor Show for the world premiere of the new 12-cylinder berlinetta, the 812 Superfast, the most powerful and fastest Ferrari in the marque’s history.

This new car not only introduces a plethora of innovative features but is also particularly significant as the V12 series marked the official start of the glorious Prancing Horse story in 1947, 70 years ago this year.

The 812 Superfast thus ushers in a new era in Ferrari 12-cylinder history, in doing so building on the invaluable legacies of the F12berlinetta and F12tdf. It is aimed at clients demanding the most powerful and exclusive Ferrari in the range: an uncompromising sports car that will deliver exhilarating driving both on road and track yet also be comfortable enough to allow its owners to enjoy it as an all-round experience.

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Can Conscious K-Pop Cross Over? BTS & BigHit Entertainment CEO ‘Hitman’ Bang on Taking America

On April 2, BTS played the fifth and final date of a sold-out U.S. arena run, performing to the shrieking fans who helped the group’s second full-length album, Wings, become the first K-pop project to crack the top 40 of the Billboard 200 in 2016. Since debuting in 2013, the seven-piece boy band has become a commercial behemoth in its native South Korea while continuing to make inroads within American pop culture. “Change,” an English-language hip-hop collaboration between BTS member Rap Monster and U.S. star Wale, was released three days before the kickoff of the stateside run.

“Change” touches on topics like voting rights and online harassment, while some of BTS’ biggest hits have addressed mental health. “Worldwide, our young generation shares the same issues socially and politically,” says BTS member Suga. Although K-pop music generally steers away from controversy, Rap Monster says that remaining outspoken “is important to us. And the bigger the voice we get, the more powerful our words become.”

A new BTS album is already underway and more U.S. dates might be on the way later this year. Bang Si Hyuk, the CEO and Executive Producer of label/management agency BigHit Entertainment who is better known as “Hitman” Bang, hints at “special features” designed for international listeners but thinks BTS will continue playing to its base.

“I’m not a believer in releasing full English songs to the U.S. market, like many K-pop artists have,” Bang tells Billboard in his first-ever interview with American press. “We must focus on what we do best as K-pop artists and producers and maybe add some special features to which international or U.S. music fans can feel attached. That is the best way for me to put K-pop into the mainstream U.S. music market and, in that regard, BTS will participate and perform in a way that is not much different from what they have been doing in the last three years. We’re adjusting and improving the way we do shows on the tour to meet the international or global level and expectations so that anyone, regardless of their culture and background, can enjoy BTS music and performances.”

Bang is sure to add that the group will be “very active and responsive in releasing new songs that would come out of collaborations with international artists, like 'Change.’” And, looking ahead, both the CEO and band see their most recent accomplishments as inspiration to achieve even more in the future.

“I’m so excited and thrilled at the response to the U.S. tour,” Bang says. “It’s still overwhelming and unbelievable at some point. I even further feel responsible for producing better music and production for fans around the world and I’d definitely think harder on what makes fans enthusiastic and passionate about BTS music and the band.” Meanwhile, the ambition within the group is perhaps best felt when member V winks that the group has “grander goals”; as if arena shows are just the beginning of what he and his band mates plan to accomplish around the world.

Below read on for an extended interview with BTS held before the tour kicked off. All member answers are taken via a translator except for Rap Monster.

With five arena shows, this tour is so huge and I think the main reason for that and why you guys are doing so well in America is because you sing about personal topics. Why is that so important to talk about in your music?

​Suga: Worldwide, our young generation shares the same issues socially and politically. I think that young people feel the same way about similar issues and BTS wants to cheer them up with our songs and talk about our feelings and social issues.

Rap Monster: These topics, like you said, they’re important, right? They should be told by someone. Someone should talk about it. And if someone should talk about it, then it feels like we have to talk about it. It’s very much an honor that we get power and attention from our fans them when we use our voices more. It’s important to us and the bigger the voice that we get, the more powerful that our words become.

These topics – loneliness, mental health, bullying – you don’t hear about in K-pop or even Korean culture much. Or, really, in American pop music either. Have you ever worried it might get a negative or opposite response?

​Suga: There are people who think negatively and there have been people who react negatively towards BTS’ music. But I think it’s way more important to make music with those issues because I think it’s important to encourage people to fight for those issues and, through the music, have a resolution for those issues. But I’m going to continue to talk about those issues through the music anyway. [Laughs]

Do you think K-pop needs to get more personal to gain a wider audience? Would you like to see that more in future?

Rap Monster: We still need some party songs, we still need some light love songs. I love to listen to them and feel the vibe from that. Everyone has their luggage and their shadows, but it’s up to everyone’s own [devices]. But we’re us. I think if we talk about it and if it gets more voice and attention, then maybe there are a lot of people in the world that accept us start to talk about those issues. I think that’s the change.

I thought “Spring Day” was a really big musical moment for you guys. Not only did it do really well on the charts, but this time you were showing a progression in thinking and a message of hope. The idea of recovering and winter moving to spring. Was that a conscious decision?

Rap Monster: It’s just like what you said, that was one step further. We’re always talking about the crises, the sorrows and youth’s feelings of getting lost. In many [television] programs, when we’d introduce our new album, I’d always talk about the word “recovery.” Like you said, it’s all about the recovery. Winter going to spring. The middle of the winter going to the spring. You got that.

​Suga: In addition to being what we are as BTS, we wanted to bring some changes and we actually wanted to evolve as a group. We wanted to show our many colors, but we still want to console others and give hope to others.

Something that was unique was all the solo songs on the Wings album. You’ve done mixtapes, but instead of full-fledged solo or unit releases, you got to show your different sides of yourselves. Why was that necessary?

Jin: The solo tracks were important because it was personal, an individual story and it was represented in the way that we are good at it. We worked a lot on each track and that’s why it was important to each of us.

Rap Monster: When I get questions about why is K-pop is so popular; I always tell them K-pop is like a great mix of music, videos, visuals, choreography, social media and real-life contents. Making the solo tracks on the album was quite a venture, but it’s connected to the concept. Like, when you watch the “I Need U” video, everyone has their own crises and characters. It’s kind of connected to our real personalities and characters, but the solo songs have their own characters and personalities. It’s all connected. It’s a mixture and that’s why people get interested in the concepts.

Speaking of solo songs, “Change” recently came out. Rap Monster, you and Wale are talking about different-but-similar issues when South Korea and America are both having interesting political times. Did you guys have a chance to discuss your different viewpoints?

Rap Monster: We didn’t have the time to get into it deeply, but I’m always watching the news about Trump and America; I always watch. When he first suggested a collaboration, I was like, “What should we do?” We could just do you know, a common hip-hop song, but I wanted to do a little more special. We have our political situation in Korea and the students are very angry. So, I think, if we talked about what’s going on, then we’ll have a real special collaboration. I think my guess was right and it became special.

Do you see or feel your influence among other groups in the industry?

​Jungkook: When we debuted back in 2013, we were influenced by our sunbaenim [Korean word for “senior”]. Over the years, as we watched other younger groups, we know they talk about us, they cover us and they follow us. I think they’re saying in interviews that they learned a lot from us and that makes us feel great. Being a sunbaenim, we want to be a good influence and be a better role model to other groups.

Last question, are you happy?

V: For now, we are very happy as we are, as a group, together. And I think we are happy because we are walking on the same path, walking the same direction. We wanted to get Daesang [Best of the Year award], but we have it already so our goal is to make great music, to share it with our fans.

Rap Monster: And a worldwide, stadium tour. That’s the goal.

V: We have grander goals.

© Jeff Benjamin @ Billboard

10 Reasons I should play Isak in the US Skam Remake

1. Isak and I are virtually indistinguishable from one another. Never before have I so closely, intensely related to a fictional character. 

2. I can rock a snapback

3. I wrote, co-directed, and starred in a short film that won the Atlantic Youth Film Festival and went on to be featured at the Toronto International Film Festival High School Festival

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GjC3oncA6g8

4. REALLY want a blonde Isak? I’m game

5. I totally felt a Natural Connection™️ with Tarjei AND Henrik when I got to meet them 

6. Trying to be straight™️? ME

7. I can cry. I mean, CRY cry. Ugly cry (but still look good) 

8. Do you see that picture of me and my boy squad in front of a castle? Yeah. #boysquad 

9. I’ve acted in almost a dozen plays, both through school and independently, as well as three short films, so I know what I’m doing, but am definitely an unknown. 

10. Sitting on a bench? Sign me up

BONUS: I would do anything to play Isak Valtersen. Julie and Tarjei were able to expertly craft this phenomenal character that helped me grow as a person more than I ever thought a fictional character could. When I watch Skam, I see so much of myself in Isak. I took the exact same Gay Test as him. I laid awake for hours wondering if boys I liked, liked me back. I awkwardly came out to my friends when they heard it from other people first. I dated girls to prove to myself and people around me that I was straight. My first gay kiss was ripped right from a movie, only I was laying down like Sleeping Beauty and he got down on one knee and kissed me. I understand Isak because I am Isak. I’m the scared, lonely, angry closeted kid who makes other people guess who I like because it’s easier than telling them myself. I know US Skam won’t be able to replicate Julie and Tarjei’s Isak, because it never could. Nothing and nobody ever could. I don’t know if US Skam will be good; some remakes (The Office, Shameless) are amazing, others (Skins) are terrible. I hope US Skam is good, because I hope other people get to have characters they connect with the way I connect with Isak. I want to play Isak (or Isaac?) because I want to do for somewhat else what Tarjei did for me. I will always be grateful to him. I will never be able to thank him and Julie enough for Isak Valtersen. 


If anybody important ever sees this and wants to give me a chance, I’ll be eternally grateful to you as well. :) 

7

The Wailing (2016)

Directed by Na Hong-jin

Cinematography by Hong Kyung-pyo

'Can Conscious K-Pop Cross Over? BTS & BigHit Entertainment CEO 'Hitman' Bang on Taking America (Interview by Jeff Benjamin)'

On April 2, BTS played the fifth and final date of a sold-out U.S. arena run, performing to the shrieking fans who helped the group’s second full-length album, Wings, become the first K-pop project to crack the top 40 of the Billboard 200 in 2016. Since debuting in 2013, the seven-piece boy band has become a commercial behemoth in its native South Korea while continuing to make inroads within American pop culture. “Change,” an English-language hip-hop collaboration between BTS member Rap Monster and U.S. star Wale, was released three days before the kickoff of the stateside run.

“Change” touches on topics like voting rights and online harassment, while some of BTS’ biggest hits have addressed mental health. “Worldwide, our young generation shares the same issues socially and politically,” says BTS member Suga. Although K-pop music generally steers away from controversy, Rap Monster says that remaining outspoken “is important to us. And the bigger the voice we get, the more powerful our words become.”

A new BTS album is already underway and more U.S. dates might be on the way later this year. Bang Si Hyuk, the CEO and Executive Producer of label/management agency BigHit Entertainment who is better known as “Hitman” Bang, hints at “special features” designed for international listeners but thinks BTS will continue playing to its base.

“I’m not a believer in releasing full English songs to the U.S. market, like many K-pop artists have,” Bang tells Billboard in his first-ever interview with American press. “We must focus on what we do best as K-pop artists and producers and maybe add some special features to which international or U.S. music fans can feel attached. That is the best way for me to put K-pop into the mainstream U.S. music market and, in that regard, BTS will participate and perform in a way that is not much different from what they have been doing in the last three years. We’re adjusting and improving the way we do shows on the tour to meet the international or global level and expectations so that anyone, regardless of their culture and background, can enjoy BTS music and performances.”

Bang is sure to add that the group will be “very active and responsive in releasing new songs that would come out of collaborations with international artists, like ‘Change.’” And, looking ahead, both the CEO and band see their most recent accomplishments as inspiration to achieve even more in the future.

“I’m so excited and thrilled at the response to the U.S. tour,” Bang says. “It’s still overwhelming and unbelievable at some point. I even further feel responsible for producing better music and production for fans around the world and I’d definitely think harder on what makes fans enthusiastic and passionate about BTS music and the band.” Meanwhile, the ambition within the group is perhaps best felt when member V winks that the group has “grander goals”; as if arena shows are just the beginning of what he and his band mates plan to accomplish around the world.

With five arena shows, this tour is so huge and I think the main reason for that and why you guys are doing so well in America is because you sing about personal topics. Why is that so important to talk about in your music?

​Suga: Worldwide, our young generation shares the same issues socially and politically. I think that young people feel the same way about similar issues and BTS wants to cheer them up with our songs and talk about our feelings and social issues.

Rap Monster: These topics, like you said, they’re important, right? They should be told by someone. Someone should talk about it. And if someone should talk about it, then it feels like we have to talk about it. It’s very much an honor that we get power and attention from our fans them when we use our voices more. It’s important to us and the bigger the voice that we get, the more powerful that our words become.

These topics – loneliness, mental health, bullying – you don’t hear about in K-pop or even Korean culture much. Or, really, in American pop music either. Have you ever worried it might get a negative or opposite response?

​Suga: There are people who think negatively and there have been people who react negatively towards BTS’ music. But I think it’s way more important to make music with those issues because I think it’s important to encourage people to fight for those issues and, through the music, have a resolution for those issues. But I’m going to continue to talk about those issues through the music anyway. [Laughs]

Do you think K-pop needs to get more personal to gain a wider audience? Would you like to see that more in future?

Rap Monster: We still need some party songs, we still need some light love songs. I love to listen to them and feel the vibe from that. Everyone has their luggage and their shadows, but it’s up to everyone’s own [devices]. But we’re us. I think if we talk about it and if it gets more voice and attention, then maybe there are a lot of people in the world that accept us start to talk about those issues. I think that’s the change.

I thought “Spring Day” was a really big musical moment for you guys. Not only did it do really well on the charts, but this time you were showing a progression in thinking and a message of hope. The idea of recovering and winter moving to spring. Was that a conscious decision?

Rap Monster: It’s just like what you said, that was one step further. We’re always talking about the crises, the sorrows and youth’s feelings of getting lost. In many [television] programs, when we’d introduce our new album, I’d always talk about the word “recovery.” Like you said, it’s all about the recovery. Winter going to spring. The middle of the winter going to the spring. You got that.

​Suga: In addition to being what we are as BTS, we wanted to bring some changes and we actually wanted to evolve as a group. We wanted to show our many colors, but we still want to console others and give hope to others.

Something that was unique was all the solo songs on the Wings album. You’ve done mixtapes, but instead of full-fledged solo or unit releases, you got to show your different sides of yourselves. Why was that necessary?

Jin: The solo tracks were important because it was personal, an individual story and it was represented in the way that we are good at it. We worked a lot on each track and that’s why it was important to each of us.

Rap Monster: When I get questions about why is K-pop is so popular; I always tell them K-pop is like a great mix of music, videos, visuals, choreography, social media and real-life contents. Making the solo tracks on the album was quite a venture, but it’s connected to the concept. Like, when you watch the “I Need U” video, everyone has their own crises and characters. It’s kind of connected to our real personalities and characters, but the solo songs have their own characters and personalities. It’s all connected. It’s a mixture and that’s why people get interested in the concepts.

Speaking of solo songs, “Change” recently came out. Rap Monster, you and Wale are talking about different-but-similar issues when South Korea and America are both having interesting political times. Did you guys have a chance to discuss your different viewpoints?

Rap Monster: We didn’t have the time to get into it deeply, but I’m always watching the news about Trump and America; I always watch. When he first suggested a collaboration, I was like, “What should we do?” We could just do you know, a common hip-hop song, but I wanted to do a little more special. We have our political situation in Korea and the students are very angry. So, I think, if we talked about what’s going on, then we’ll have a real special collaboration. I think my guess was right and it became special.

Do you see or feel your influence among other groups in the industry?

​Jungkook: When we debuted back in 2013, we were influenced by our sunbaenim [Korean word for “senior”]. Over the years, as we watched other younger groups, we know they talk about us, they cover us and they follow us. I think they’re saying in interviews that they learned a lot from us and that makes us feel great. Being a sunbaenim, we want to be a good influence and be a better role model to other groups.

Last question, are you happy?

V: For now, we are very happy as we are, as a group, together. And I think we are happy because we are walking on the same path, walking the same direction. We wanted to get Daesang [Best of the Year award], but we have it already so our goal is to make great music, to share it with our fans.

Rap Monster: And a worldwide, stadium tour. That’s the goal.

V: We have grander goals.

2

It’s still February so it still counts as Valentine’s Day fic, right?  Right? *nervous laugh*

There’s another drawing, too, but it really belongs at the end of the story, so it’s under the spoiler cut.

Inspired by this post about a Valentine’s Day-ike holiday for Hyrule - almost all the worldbuilding about Ribbon Day is from there, so credit where it’s due, those aren’t my ideas!

Ribbon Day

8,007 words, Vio/Shadow, rated T

Summary: When Shadow is introduced to a Hyrulean holiday celebrating different kinds of relationships, he starts to question whether his feelings for Vio are really as platonic as he has believed them to be for the past two years.  But even if he lets himself admit that it’s romantic love, he can’t escape the feeling that he’s getting it wrong somehow.  That he’s missing some crucial piece.

Who would expect a shadow-demon to be able to love properly, anyway?

Featuring asexual!Shadow, internalized acephobia/self-loathing, and lots of pining.  Which makes it sound like a much sadder story than it actually is.  I swear it ends well!

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If There's God (of Social Media)

@kazliin I’m not done with coping from your destructive chapter.

I cannot write angst, thank god for that. So there’s my semi headcannon/hopeful thinking of what happen behind he screen?? This is heavily inspired by @kixboxer ’s idea of Victor’s secret internet accounts


—-


Victor Nikiforov have two instagram account.

He also have two twitter handle.

One of the account in each platform are ratified, blue ticked, and co-managed by Yakov’s PR team during the time of need such as posterity shots, events and exclusive shows announcement.

The other account, however, lacks the mark of legitimacy, have less than 3 digit followers in contrast of millions in his official accounts, also running mainly on Katsuki Yuuri based content.

His second instagram especially, conspicuously named poodleonskate, is an avid follower of Phicit Chulanont’s account and religiously liking every single post tagged #spottheyuuri, won at least 3 giveaway post (2 of them are Yuuri Merchandise, the other is artisan nail polish set) and mainly posts random scenery photos and Katsuki Yuuri’s screengrab stills.

His other twitter also used to liking and retweeting every Yuuri-content from Chulanont’s feed. He also used the twitter to gush about Yuuri with fellow Yuuri fans, that probably will shred him alive if they know that he’s… well.. him?

Victor probably spent more time using his unofficial account more than Yakov would like. He almost failed to be surprised when Mila casually commented on his post as poodleonskate, she probably caught him engaging some excited foray with twitter user yuurifan1275 about Katsuki’s new exhibition skate. Yakov apparently knows too and offhandedly warned him about personal information and maintaining public image.

That didn’t stop him to occasionally slip. The worst slip on came in the form of liking one of Chulanont’s instagram post using his official account.

(“Holy fucking shit?”, Phichit choked and ultimately sprayed the half chewed remains of his breakfast all over the kitchen table. The notification in his phone stayed innocently.

‘V-nikiforov, blueducky, saracrispino liked your post
#spottheyuuri #cocolacafe #spring #detroit #dogfriendslife ’

“Ew.” Yuuri crossed the livingroom with disdainful eyes towards their table and the remains of Phicit’s breakfast all over their dingy table.

As much as he wanted to share the extraordinary happening in his sns life, Yuuri getting aneurysm this early in the morning is not exactly the best scenario for everyone involved.)

Yakov gave him an earful afterwards while his rinkmates watched from the rinkside with varying degree of amusement and secondhand embarrassment. Half an hour and several ‘yes coach, not going to happen again’ thrown, Victor’s back on the ice with nothing but slight mortification and cold dread of someone caught red handed. Despite himself, a traitorous part of his mind cannot help but being thrilled of the outcome.He slightly hoped that Yuuri (or Phichit, and then by proxy, Yuuri) would comment on it.

They didn’t.

—–

Donna Francie @bingowednesday
What just happenED?!!!! OMG!!
[img]

Eloisethecat @bonnie-bie
@bingowednesday Victor liked a #spottheyuuri post??#whatdoesthatmean #viktuuri

Victuuriistotallyreal @just-inn
Excuse me while I’m draining my tears out #viktuuri

Bluescluesboy @JonahLi
@bonnie-b @bingowednesday here we go again…

Viktorlove @sundayterrs
@JonahLi Ikr?! It’s just a lke?!! We all know Victor LOVES dog? Like LOVE LOVE? That post have a cute dog!! Not evrything is abt your gross shipping!

Zaskia G. @chameleonarecute
Another day in FS fandom.. #viktuurilimbo #spottheyuuri

ひめこ。西山 @kumahimee
Can confirm that Japanese twitter also lost their shit. #instagate #spottheyuuri #viktornikiforov #katsukiyuuri #figureskating

—–

After the Big Reveal, years worth of tears were spilled within a day, heart wrenching apologies, more kissing, and tedious ceremonies and official duties performed with hands on each other’s body parts, the floodgate finally opened.

Within an hour V-nikiforov’s official account already liked every post tagged #spottheyuuri, compilation videos of Yuuri singing in the livingroom while dipping a mop, every Katsuki based aesthetic blog, and various account’s post in which Yuuri is tagged.

(“Holy shit.” Ketty said as her feed flooded with notification after skating legend Victor Nikiforov, also Yuuri’s supposed arch nemesis retweeted her post about Yuuri’s FS composing session, liked Every.single.photos. In her instagram featuring her equipment that was used in composing Yuuri on Ice song.)

(“Holy shit” said professor Gilman of Advanced Trigonometry class after his usually barren instagram feed exploded after someone named V-nikiforov liked his last year’s class photo featuring international student slash campus heartthrob Katsuki.)


“Really.” Yuuri asked dryly, but the corner of his mouth are soft and fond.

Victor looked him straight in the eyes, his eyes are sporting the same puffiness as Yuuri and as red. His nose is still clogged when he answered but his grin are terribly (terribly) blinding.

“Really.”

—–
Phicit+chu posted

[image]

I totally appreciate the likes guys, but #reallyvictor? #nowweknow #wegetit #littleyurihadbenscreamingfor10minutes #guys #guystherearechildrenpresent #pausethekissing #victuuri #lovewins #Iamthebestman

—–

7

Rogue One (2016)

Directed by Gareth Edwards

Cinematography by Greig Fraser

2

N͏͎̮̦̪̹ Ơ͓͕͇͎


̗̪̯͚̺̝J̗̰̟̟̗͠ Ư̰̩̦͕̞̪ Ś̲̩̳͓͙͔ T̥ B̳̮ O͏̯̲̫͙̺͎ R̻̯̼͇̞̥̯͠ I S̤͇̹̙͍͙̻ A̰̻̪ S̫̥̭͠ Y̻̰ Ǫ̤͚͓̣͔̤̘ U͇̱ C̝͡ A͔͚͎ Ṇ͕́ S E͚͎ E̛̫ͅ F̼̻̠ R̷͕̬̩̼̞̞ O҉̞ M͖ T̟̣̻ H̭̭̣̻̻̬ I̘̳̦̼̭͙ S̬

̟͡O͓̩̝͚ Ṟ̴͈̱̤ I̜̫̩͕̙ G̢ I N͍͇̮̙͔͡ A L

C̥̠͕͔ O͕̺̞̱ M͙̺͕ P̝͓̀ L͓̤̩̻ E̜ T̶͎͈͉͉ E̠̟̼̗͎̲ L̟̺̻ Ỳ̲ U̸͇͔ N̯̞̹̪ A̝͓̹̰̭̙ L̜̳̥̗̤ T̲͙̲͕̳̫̥͠ E͏̣͉͉ R̢̙̩ E̥̰̮̰ D̜̱

̻̻̣͍̣̘̀N̼ O̥͎̩̞̫̳̕ͅ C̮̩ Ḥ͝ Á̭̹͎ N̷̯̫̳ G E S̪̜̫̙̲ M̵ A̞͇̬̜̮͜ D E


̖D̞̜͉͚ͅ R͓̘ A͙͓̱ W͖̪̬ I͞ N̬̗͙̦͎̘̲ G̠̥͔



[Bendy does not take well to your question. You have summoned the ink mess.]
[Ask box is open]

#52Exhibitions: Information (1970)

The milestone exhibition Information, which opened in 1970, helped to introduce Conceptual art to American audiences. It featured works by an international range of artists—some of them, like Adrian Piper, making their museum debuts—and all asking, according to curator Kynaston McShine, how to create an art that could reach broader audiences than those typically interested in contemporary art. Information featured Hans Haacke’s famous “MoMA-Poll,” a foundational example of institutional critique. Visitors were asked to drop a ballot into either one of two clear boxes labeled “yes” and “no” based on one question: “Would the fact that Governor Rockefeller has not denounced President Nixon’s Indochina policy be a reason for you to not vote for him in November?” While explicitly antiwar, Haacke’s question was also multi-pronged in its critique: Rockefeller was, at the time, a member of MoMA’s board of trustees, making the Museum itself complicit with the Governor’s silence on Nixon’s policies.

Read the out-of-print catalogue, see views of the installation, and more at mo.ma/2tu0lze

Beholder Anatomy - Part 1 - External Anatomy

Beholders are perhaps the most deadly of the great monsters of the D&D World.

They are certainly one of the most distinctive and unusual in appearance.

The original beholders are said to have been spawned on one of the Outer Planes by a primal entity as powerful as a deity.

This creature has no name, and its children have no need to generate one for it.

To others, it is known only as the Great Mother, a name granted more for the fact that the creature spawned the entire beholder race from its very flesh than for any real certainty that it is female.

From the Great Mother, the beholder race and its various kin have propagated to the other planes with great success, for few can stand in the way of such destructive creatures.

Although the information in this is presented as fact, beholders are alien creatures in body, mind, and soul…

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Ivory Coast Market: Goods for Sale

Colorful vegetable seller in Abidjan, open market, Ivory Coast.

Photo Exhibition in Brasilia, Brazil
November 5-20, 2008. Featuring six international photographers. Overall exhibit: THE HEART OF AFRICA. Thirty images from Steve Evans in a sub-show called: AFRICA HEART, AFRICA SOUL. Sponsored by Cara e Cultura Negra.

Africa Heart, Africa Soul

A Photographic Exhibition by Steve Evans

“When shooting, there are certain qualities that immediately capture my attention,” Steve said. “It often has to do with the face and the eyes and what they might be saying – ‘I have wisdom,’ or ‘I know sorrow,’ or ‘I have dignity,’ or ‘I survived,’ or ‘I’m in love.’ I look for dignity and pride in a person. I look for pain and sorrow, melancholy and loneliness. I look for wisdom reflected in the wrinkles of age. I look for the innocence of youth, for the bond of strong relationships between a mother and a child, a father and a son, two friends, a man and a woman. These reflect the heart and soul of a person. In addition, there are particular circumstances of nature – like a sunrise or sunset – that reflect the very heart and soul of God.” Each image of “Africa Heart, Africa Soul” is a window into the very heart and soul of Africa, featuring photographs from the slave forts of West Africa to the majestic sunrises and sunsets of southern and central Africa. Six countries are documented: Zimbabwe, Malawi, Mozambique, Ethiopia, Ghana, and Ivory Coast, and the images span over twenty-five years of photographing Africa.