features and interviews

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Stephanie Johnson, Dawn Cook form Delta’s first all-black, all-women cockpit

  • Here’s some #BlackGirlMagic as Black History Month ends and Women’s History Month begins.
  • Delta pilots first officer Dawn Cook and captain Stephanie Johnson made history in late February. They were the two members of the first all-black, all women cockpit on a mainline Delta flight.
  • According to the Root, Cook and Johnson were flying the Airbus 320 from Detroit to Las Vegas on Feb. 26. Johnson also made history in the past by becoming Delta’s first female African-American captain.
  • Johnson said in her feature interview with Delta Airlines’ blog that she gained her interest in flying with the help and motivation from her high school physics teacher. Read more (3/6/17 10:54 AM)

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Three days after Harry Styles fans hear his highly anticipated debut solo album, they’ll get a deeper look into how the album all came together. Apple Music has all the behind-the-scenes footage Stylers could want in a documentary titled Harry Styles: Behind the Album, premiering May 15.

In addition to clips from Styles recording in the studio, the film will also feature an exclusive interview with Styles himself as well as live footage of Harry’s band performing his album songs for the first time together at Abbey Road. A trailer for the doc shows Styles singing, scuba diving, and yes, even getting his famous locks chopped – oh, and according to a press release, fans will also get to see Mr. Styles in his underwear.

Haikyu!! Is getting a 23 minute ova anime called “Tokushū! Harukō Volley ni Kaketa Seishun” (Special Edition! Youths Wagering the Spring High Volleyball Tournament), it’ll be bundled with the 27th manga and released Aug 4!

“The OVA will look back at the spring tournament primaries, and feature “interviews” with the players.“

CHARACTERS LIKE OIKAWA AND KUROO WILL BE SHOWN IN THIS OVA. AKA OIKAWA WILL BE BACK BREATHING, BLINKING AND ALIVE!!!! I’M SO HAPPY.

Yuri on Ice interview translation - CREA 2017/03 (p34-35)

Second part of the YOI interviews featured on CREA. As for the one with Kubo, more than “interviews” they are like “mini articles” that incorporate what the interviewed people said. The interviews are with Kenji Miyamoto (choreographer), Eiji Abiko & Junpei Tatenaka (figure skating animators), Yuuko Sagiri (original costume designer), Keisuke Tominaga (music producer).

Random note: thanks to this magazine I was finally able to know that Sagiri’s name is “Yuuko”. When I translated her interview on Pash I did lots of research but wasn’t able to find out the pronunciation so I used Yuiko because that was what came out searching for the name alone, but now it’s confirmed that it’s Yuuko so as soon as I have time I’ll edit that interview to fix it. I swear all magazines should be obliged to provide the pronunciation of names, because sometimes it’s really hard to find out how the kanji are pronounced when it’s not famous people with Wikipedia pages and such…

By the way, the issue of Pash coming out today (Feb. 10th) has an article I was really looking forward to (the second part of Kubo’s detailed commentary on each episode), so I’ll probably spend the night translating it when I get home from work. Also because I want to post it before the YOI all night event on Saturday (I’m going to the live viewing).

***If you wish to share this translation please do it by reblogging or posting a link to it***

***Re-translating into other languages is ok but please mention that this post is the source***


The reality as expressed by 5 people who created “Yuri on Ice”

Reality #2: Choreography x Kenji Miyamoto
“The footage taken with the camcorder was the key to create realistic and powerful anime scenes”

Profile: From Hyogo prefecture. After retiring from competitive ice dance in 2006 he started working as a choreographer and commentator. With director Sayo Yamamoto’s “ENDLESS NIGHT” for the first time he was involved in creating figure skating choreographies for an anime.

The choreographies for all characters’ programs were created by choreographer Kenji Miyamoto. He created them integrating the music with the information he received from director Yamamoto and Kubo regarding the characters and their programs. What was different than usual is that the songs for the FS were 4 minutes long instead of 4:30 minutes.
“In the anime characters need less strokes to speed up, so it’s possible to use less ‘transitions’, the movements connecting different techniques. I cut down on those and made the programs more compact.”
Miyamoto was filmed with 4 fixed cameras and 2 portable camcorders as he danced all the programs, then the footage was edited into a multiframe video based on which the animated figure skating scenes were created.
“I believe that the footage taken with the portable camcorder, that filmed me up close, is what made it possible to create realistic and powerful tournament scenes.”
After watching the finished anime, Miyamoto commented that the characters’ monologues during their performances are realistic.
“When you are performing lots of things are whirling around inside your head. In my case it wasn’t words but still pictures, like photographs. I was happy that they expressed the athletes’ feelings.”


Reality #3: Animation x Junpei Tatenaka & Eiji Abiko
“The performances look realistic thanks to Miyamoto-sensei’s choreographies”

Profile: Animators working for the anime production company MAPPA. Specialized in sports and action scenes. They both created animation for director Sayo Yamamoto’s “ENDLESS NIGHT”.

Animation of the figure skating scenes was created by action specialists Junpei Tatenaka and Eiji Abiko. “It’s the first time that we digitally create 2D pictures after deciding the camerawork. It was very difficult because we had to figure out how to do everything”.
Tatenaka, who was already a fan of figure skating, says: “For the moments I believed to be the ‘highlights’ of a performance I would add 1-2 extra stills. This way, I was able to draw out a little what in the live footage only lasted an instant.” They actually made jumps much higher than they are in real life.
“While being aware that real skaters wouldn’t jump that high, I still wanted the scenes to be striking, therefore I was always looking for a good balance between realism and what could be allowed in animation.” (Abiko)
They both agree that Miyamoto’s choreography footage was the most important factor that allowed them to create realistic performance scenes.
“When there was a key point in the music, Miyamoto-sensei would pose with all of his body creating a beautiful line, from his fingertips to the tips of his toes. It was very easy to draw.” (Tatenaka)


Reality #4: Costumes x Yuuko Sagiri
“I think the only difference is that there were no budget restrictions (LOL)”

Profile: Ballroom dancing costume designer working for the ballet & dance supplies maker Chacott. She has designed figure skating costumes for athletes such as Nobunari Oda and Akiko Suzuki.

Yuuko Sagiri, designer of the athletes’ costumes, created the designs giving importance to functionality that would improve a skater’s performance and to elements that would make the character’s personality stand out, just like she does for real costumes. She chose materials, cuttings and decorations that would actually be employed in costumes used for real performances.
“Normally I objectively watch an athlete’s past performances to understand their level and what kind of movements they are skilled at, and this is then reflected in the design. This time I based the design on the characters’ setting materials, the information I received from the director and the choreography footage by Miyamoto-sensei. I think the only difference is that there were no budget restrictions (LOL).”
Regarding Yuuri’s costume, she mentions that she wanted to reflect the fact that he is psychologically weak and gains weight easily.
“I added shining decorations on his chest so that his face would look bright even when he is tense. The cuts on the waist are to make him look slim.”
Actually, she also designed a costume for Yurio’s exhibition. Sagiri said that she created the design thinking of what “Yurio would really want to wear”. We’d definitely like to see him skate with that costume!


Reality #5: Music x Keisuke Tominaga
“I added melody to the beautiful lyrics that is ‘Yuri on Ice’”

Profile: From Kanagawa prefecture. Music producer. He founded PIANO INC. in 2012 and is the current representative director. His main works include the Pocari Sweat 2016 commercial “Kimi no Yume wa, Boku no Yume.”, the TV anime “Zankyou no Terror”, etc.

When creating the music for this show, music producer Keisuke Tominaga constantly asked himself whether it was music you could dance to.
“I would move my hands, feet, my whole body, sometimes even checking the rhythm like a conductor or a dancer. Figure skating has many elements that resemble ballet, so to express the elegant movements of the body I used many tunes in triple time like waltz and bolero.”
Most of the classical and orchestra tracks were created by Taku Matsushiba, while the vocal tracks and modern band songs by Tarou Umebayashi. They worked on the music as a team, always communicating with each other.
“The world created by Kubo-san and director Yamamoto was like realistic and beautiful ‘lyrics’, and I feel that our role was to create a ‘melody’ for those lyrics. In fact, when I joined together Yuuri’s FS song “Yuri on ICE” and Victor’s recorded voice for the first time, the lines sounded just like the words of a song, and I can’t describe how moved I was. I believe that this strong, deep expression that you would not be able to obtain with music alone is what realistically affects the viewers.”


Bonus in case you haven’t seen it already: Sagiri’s design for Yurio’s exhibition program.

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At last! I’ve located the 60 Minutes interview featuring that Nate Dykeman interview.  Among other goodies; :)

  1:12 sharper senior photos of Eric posed by the bench
30:04 - Brooks Brown, Randy and Judy Brown interviews
35:51 - two more clearer Eric senior photo
34:02 - Nate Dykeman interview (yes that one!)
34:44 - Devon Adams interview - reported Eric to the school; clearly no love.

I found this 60 minutes to be pretty interesting thorough show.  They really pursue and demonstrate to us how unquestionably poor Jeffco police/SWAT handled Columbine. Lives were lost due to their lack of action.  They justify it as following the protocol they had in place which is basically a passive ‘wait and see’ response but no adequate excuses can be given to justify the lives that were lost because of their lack of flexibility in an emergency situation. Their fuck up cost their own children’s lives. Some of those cops had children in that school too!  The poor parents, two years in and filled with grief, still do not understand how police could’ve stayed outside waiting hours to get the green light to go into the school and do their job.  Even then, the cops went in on the far/east side of the school (where none of the action occurred) and slowly combed through. Such a waste of time and resources.  Today, Eric and Dylan would not at all have had the upper hand they were given by the authorities back in ‘99.  It’s amazing when you think of E and D walking around lazily in the cafeteria trying to get the bombs to explode when they could clearly see the cops surrounding the school from the cafeteria windows.  They must have continually wondered why in the back of their minds that no confrontation was happening. They were ruling the roost for far longer than any school shooter today would be allowed to.

billboard.com
'Harry Styles: Behind the Album' Documentary Coming to Apple Music May 15
Three days after Harry Styles fans hear his highly anticipated debut solo album, they'll get a deeper look into how the album all came together.

Three days after Harry Styles fans hear his highly anticipated debut solo album, they’ll get a deeper look into how the album all came together. Apple Music has all the behind-the-scenes footage Stylers could want in a documentary titled Harry Styles: Behind the Album, premiering May 15.

In addition to clips from Styles recording in the studio, the film will also feature an exclusive interview with Styles himself as well as live footage of Harry’s band performing his album songs for the first time together at Abbey Road. A trailer for the doc shows Styles singing, scuba diving, and yes, even getting his famous locks chopped – oh, and according to a press release, fans will also get to see Mr. Styles in his underwear.

“I kinda wanted to see if I could write something people liked without knowing everything about me,” Styles says of the album in the trailer. “Anytime you’re doing anything different, it’s a bit scary.”

Check out the 30-second teaser of Harry Styles: Behind the Album, which will be available only on Apple Music May 15.

billboard.com
'Harry Styles: Behind the Album' Documentary Coming to Apple Music May 15
Three days after Harry Styles fans hear his highly anticipated debut solo album, they'll get a deeper look into how the album all came together.

Three days after Harry Styles fans hear his highly anticipated debut solo album, they’ll get a deeper look into how the album all came together. Apple Music has all the behind-the-scenes footage Stylers could want in a documentary titled Harry Styles: Behind the Album, premiering May 15.

In addition to clips from Styles recording in the studio, the film will also feature an exclusive interview with Styles himself as well as live footage of Harry’s band performing his album songs for the first time together at Abbey Road. A trailer for the doc shows Styles singing, scuba diving, and yes, even getting his famous locks chopped – oh, and according to a press release, fans will also get to see Mr. Styles in his underwear.

“I kinda wanted to see if I could write something people liked without knowing everything about me,” Styles says of the album in the trailer. “Anytime you’re doing anything different, it’s a bit scary.”

Bed of Nails, Shirley Mellmann for Alexander McQueen, 1998

In 2015, to time with Savage Beauty showing at the V&A, SHOWstudio unveiled previously unseen footage detailing McQueen and Nick Knight’s longtime collaboration. Footage from iconic collaborations featured alongside candid interviews with a number of McQueen’s collaborators including Michael Clark, Katy England and Michelle Olley among others.  For me, this image in particular sums up Nick and McQueen’s collaborative spirit, exploring the duality and complexity in imagery. Pairing strength and vulnerability, elegance and irreverence, beauty and darkness. This image is truly savage beauty. - Lou Stoppard, SHOWstudio Editor-at-Large

anonymous asked:

Care to elaborate on your tags re: Harry's music and your worries concerning content vs form? I don't get it. Thanks.

So short version (I’ll try and write a post that explains what I actually mean some time in the future - but I can already feel that this post is going to be long).  my concerns about Harry’s music are quite personal.  I really value specificity in music and also fun/joy.  Harry’s interview further suggested that I probably couldn’t expect much of either of these things from his album.  I’d kind of figured that from SOTT and ESNY.  I don’t think joy or specificity are where he’s at as a songwriter - and I also think there is a lot about his position that would discourage joy (and even more so) specificity in songs.  I find the reasons that he might not be into joy and specificity in songs quite endearing and I have huge sympathy for them.  So it doesn’t necessarily change the way I respond to him as a person, but it will change the way I respond to his music.  And it does make me sad, for me, that the music he’s putting out won’t be the sort of music that most resonates with me.

********

The content vs. form thing of his interview is kind of a feature of the form itself.  Long celebrity interviews are this dance where the celebrity performs being accessible and intimate, while staying on brand and the journalist writes as if they’re revealing while also maintaining access.  To me there were these really jarring juxtapositions to the words Harry was saying and the form of the promo campaign that he was saying it.

So Harry says: “ “Who’s to say that young girls who like pop music – short for popular, right? – have worse musical taste than a 30-year-old hipster guy?” etc in his first in depth print interview with a magazine whose entire mission has been to uphold the supremacy of the 30-year-old hipster guy.  This venue and the interviewer were very definitely chosen to signal to those 30-year-old hipster guy that it was OK to like Harry.  On top of that Harry carefully and repeatedly uses the word honest - to signal to those readers that his music is better and more authentic now than it was in One Direction when those teenage girls liked him.

Or Harry says: “I feel like they were always thinking, ‘OK, this ride could stop at any point and we’re going to have to be there when it does.’ There was something about playing the album and how happy I was that told them, ‘If all I get is to make this music, I’m content. If I’m never on that big ride again, I’m happy and proud of it.'” While part of an incredibly highly controlled, high-stakes, promo campaign, designed to make him a solo superstar.

Now that’s really normal, that’s kind of a feature of this sort of interview.  But the impression I got from to the totality of the interview was not that Harry was not just carefully selling an image, but also quite mixed up about who he wanted to be and how he wanted to relate to people, mystery vs honesty and so on.  That this jarring juxtaposition wasn’t just a feature of the form of the celebrity, but also showing how ambivalent and unclear Harry was about all this stuff. 

In particular, it made me think of two different statements kind of about being seen.  One was Harry’s own, from a year in the making, “I want to be someone who doesn’t care what people think, but I just don’t think I am.” For me, everything about this promo campaign has demonstrated how much both of those things, wanting not to care, but really caring, are still absolutely true for Harry.

And the other was Jodie Foster’s coming out speech - which is a mess, but I’ve always thought a really profound mess:

…be a big coming-out speech tonight because I already did my coming out about a thousand years ago back in the Stone Age, in those very quaint days when a fragile young girl would open up to trusted friends and family and co-workers and then gradually, proudly to everyone who knew her, to everyone she actually met. But now I’m told, apparently, that every celebrity is expected to honor the details of their private life with a press conference, a fragrance and a prime-time reality show. […] But seriously, if you had been a public figure from the time that you were a toddler, if you’d had to fight for a life that felt real and honest and normal against all odds, then maybe you too might value privacy above all else. Privacy.

 […]

I will continue to tell stories, to move people by being moved, the greatest job in the world. It’s just that from now on, I may be holding a different talking stick. And maybe it won’t be as sparkly, maybe it won’t open on 3,000 screens, maybe it will be so quiet and delicate that only dogs can hear it whistle. But it will be my writing on the wall. Jodie Foster was here, I still am, and I want to be seen, to be understood deeply and to be not so very lonely.

(transcript here - full speech easily accessible 2013 Golden Globes).

The juxtaposition between the really deeply felt desire for privacy and the just as deeply felt desire to be seen and understood really moved me when I first saw it and I thought she made it really clear that both could be true at the same time.  And I think the speech demonstrates that when you’ve been in the public eye as long as Jodie Foster, the two desires are impossibly intertwined.

I got the same desire and contradiction (although obviously not nearly as openly laid out - which is what makes Jodie Foster’s speech extraordinarily) from Harry’s interview.  

How could he feel anything else? He’s been exposed, told stories about, hidden and lied about.  How could he feel anything but a desire for privacy and a desire to be seen and understood.  How could he hope to untangle them, or even know how to act on them at his age?

And that made me very sad for him - because I want him to have it all.  I want him to be seen and understood and I want him to have all the privacy and space he needs.  And I think either will be very difficult for him to get, let alone both.

[INTERVIEW] Zion.T Responds To Claims That He Dissed K-Pop Idols In “Complex”

In the wake of criticism that his lyrics in “Complex” (featuring G-Dragon) allegedly diss idols, Zion.T has explained that it is not true.

In the song, Zion.T says, “I wish I were an idol / Someone handsome who can dance / ‘Cause you just have to write songs about love / ‘Cause if you can’t sing you can take it off.”

Zion.T explained, “The lyrics aren’t belittling idols. I hope that there’s no misunderstanding. I saw comments, and I think in most cases it was idol fans getting mad. It’s a fact that idols endure years of training to make it through all the industry competition and debut. I respect that. I’m not an idol; our paths are different. There’s no reason for me to put idols down.”

Zion.T also spoke about why his album got delayed and the meanings behind his songs “Complex” and “Sorry” from the album “O O.”

pitchfork.com
Bleachers’ Jack Antonoff Is Your Favorite Pop Star’s Secret Weapon | Pitchfork
The most trusted voice in music.

(excerpt)

How did your life as a songwriter begin?

I didn’t grab the opportunity. Fun had a hit; “We Are Young” took off [in 2012], and it happened very quickly because it was on the heels of a TV spot. The next day, every publisher called. This was right before the age of everyone moving to L.A. to be a pop songwriter. Right away, I was able to get into the bottom level of [writing] rooms, and I’m learning right away how people are doing things. Everyone wants hits. But we weren’t trying to make a hit with “We Are Young.” I don’t sit at home all day and write and produce songs. I do it because I love it. So it was weird at first, but now it’s gotten good. I’ve worked with Carly Rae Jepsen, Sara Bareilles, Tegan and Sara, Grimes, Taylor, Lorde—that’s what I want to do. I love working with women.

Why do you think you work so well with women?

I don’t know. All emotions aside, I write a full octave above where I sing. I think about Kate Bush and those registers when I’m writing, because I always imagine that vocals should be dancing on top of the track. There’s just a lot of melodic DNA that works better for women than men. And most of my favorite artists are women—outside of all the things I said about Bruce.

Also, my experiences with men and music have been in this really macho, intense, high-octane environment. I don’t want to categorize something that’s more specifically female, but I will say that, in my experience, the women that I’ve worked with have been more interested in talking about what’s gone wrong in our lives, quietly putting it to a piano, and then eventually making it into this big thing.

I only have sisters. I always want to hear women sing my songs. I just want to be around women. It’s not a sex thing—I’m heterosexual, but it’s not coming from any place like that. It’s just a comfort thing. And my studio presence isn’t bombastic, which is funny because some of the songs are. But I like to be calm. I guess I could go way deeper into certain conversations I’ve had with my analyst about not being a certain kind of man that other men think is enough of a man.

There is an archetype of the modern male producer/songwriter, like Dr. Luke, as an all-powerful figure.

It’s a position of power, but this is work where there is no power—songwriting is the most powerless, saddest, sit-there-and-pray-it’s-going-to-come-to-you experience, you fucking Little Mermaid-style poor unfortunate soul. You sit in a room for two years and make noise until it comes. You work on something for six months, and then you go to take a shower and in six minutes you have a better idea.

When I’m working with artists, there’s no power struggles, no “I got the fucking answer, I have these hits so I’m the shit.” I hate that, and I can’t be around it, because if I’m around it, it’s like someone coming into your house and taking a piss on the floor. I can’t write a song with someone who feels that way. This is my work. This is my very safe place.

How can you say there’s no power in writing songs with someone like Taylor Swift, who’s one of the biggest musicians around. There’s an enormous amount of power in that.

But there’s not. She just sits there in the same place you’re sitting, and we just talk about songs and Joni Mitchell. I mean, I won’t name names but I’ve met many other people in her position who I decided to not make music with because when we were sitting here, they were that person who wielded a lot of power. I felt there wouldn’t have been an opportunity for us to create. I have absolutely no disrespect for anyone else but, for me, making music is so private and personal. So if a popstar came in this room and was like, “Well, I’ve done this, this, and this, so I’m right,” then why are we here? I’ll just keep doodling in my journal.

How do you decide who to work with?

If I ever work with someone else, all that I think about is: Do you want to make the best album you’ve ever made in your life, or not? And if there’s even a hesitation, then go on your greatest hits tour.

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On this day in music history: February 17, 1983 - Music superstar Michael Jackson appears on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine. The article titled “Michael Jackson: Life In The Magical Kingdom”, features an in depth interview with the very media shy pop superstar by journalist Gerri Hirshey conducted over the course of several days in the Fall of 1982. In the interview, Jackson talks about his past as a child star and about the current projects he is working on at the time which include the blockbuster album “Thriller” and the “E.T. Storybook Album”. The article reveals a not often seen side of the usually guarded Jackson, revealing himself to be sensitive and playful, but also very business savvy and highly ambitious. The cover photo taken by photographer Bonnie Schiffman is the first time Michael Jackson is featured on the cover of Rolling Stone since 1971, when The Jackson 5 are at the height of their success. The interview is the last major in print interview that Jackson grants during his career. The article is reprinted in the Rolling Stone anthology book “20 Years Of Rolling Stone: What A Long, Strange Trip It’s Been” in 1987, and in the Michael Jackson memorial commemorative issue that Rolling Stone publishes in July of 2009.

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The Permanent Rain Press Interview with Hayley Kiyoko. (Watch in HD)

We chat with Hayley Kiyoko ahead of her sold-out show in Vancouver on the One Bad Night Tour. Watch as Hayley speaks about her process as a music video director, having a human connection with fans, and portraying Stella in the 2011 Disney Channel Original Movie, Lemonade Mouth.

Newspaper article featuring an interview with Shoma (05/02):

Q: You were on the podium at every competition you participated in this season. You also received the second highest record total score.

S: I was not expecting this growth myself. This fulfilment does not feel like it’s only been a year, and I think I am a lot more confident in myself.

Q: What are your thoughts on the difference between you and Hanyu’s levels?

S: Until last season, our levels had such a big difference that it was embarrassing for me to skate in the last group with him at competitions. I am still lower than him but I feel as if I have climbed onto the same platform as him.

Q: What was the ‘turning point’ competition?

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