feature shoot

The Malayan Coral Snake was photographed by Mark Laita.

‘The sensual attractiveness of snakes, which coexists with their threatening, unpredictable and mysterious nature is truly unique. This dichotomy, in which their beauty seems to be heightened by their danger, and vice-versa, is what I find so fascinating. Add to these contradictions the rich symbolism of serpents and you have a wonderfully compelling subject’.

(see more here on Feature Shoot)

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Isa Leshko

Elderly Animals

These images are from her series, Elderly Animals, which she began after spending a year caring for her mother who has Alzheimer’s disease. Instead of photographing her family, she found an outlet for her experience in a series of portraits of aging farm animals. Her luminous photographs are a moving expression of empathy, but also a celebration of life.”

via Feature Shoot

Every year I look forward to getting the Vice photo issue. If I could describe the issue in one word, it would be fresh: full of imagery I’ve never seen from (many) photographers I’ve never heard of. We don’t miss much here at Feature Shoot, and Vice always keeps it interesting. This year, with new photo editor Matthew Leifheit at the helm, is no exception.

I asked Leifheit a few questions about nudity, Terry Richardson, fruit topiaries and the opening party this Thursday night in Red Hook, Brooklyn.

This is your first year as the photo editor at Vice. How did you approach the curation for the photo issue? 

“I went through a lot of different ideas when I first started thinking about the issue early this spring. I would take long lunches at Kasia’s, the Polish diner on Bedford Ave down the street from our offices, and fill a legal pad with (mostly bad) ideas while I slowly ate pierogies. I would come up with a theme, and think about whose work might fit, then list some names. To be honest I’ve been collecting Vice photo issues for years, so I’ve been thinking about what I might do differently if it were up to me in some capacity for quite a while.”

—Eyeballs, Vagina’s, and Raves in Chicago: Photo Editor Matthew Leifheit Talks About VICE’s 2014 Photo Show

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How I Shoot: Capturing Cocktails with @danielkrieger

For each How I Shoot, we ask an Instagrammer to tell us about the process behind their photos and videos. For more of Daniel’s pictures of food and drink, follow @danielkrieger on Instagram.

For Daniel Krieger (@danielkrieger), a photographer in New York City, the recipe for an enticing cocktail photo includes “beautiful composition, atmosphere and the best possible light.”

Though he also regularly documents dishes at restaurants such as Estela (@estelanyc) and Maison Premiere (@maisonpremiere), Daniel said that cocktails have something special going for them that most dishes don’t: their ability to transmit light. Captured correctly, “that glass just pops and creates an instant focus for the viewer.”

Here are Daniel’s tips for capturing the perfect cocktail photo:

Camera

“iPhone 5.”

Vantage Point

“A 45-degree angle is nice because it shows the different layers of the drink and glass. And try backing up a bit. When you fill the entire frame with a dish of food or, in this case, a cocktail, the frame feels cramped and the iPhone camera doesn’t do as well. Put the drink against a wall, using some of the wall in your frame to create a nice composition. Watch your peripherals. If there’s a crumpled cocktail napkin behind your drink, move it out of the frame. If some guy is in the background of your frame maybe move a little bit to get him out of it. If he keeps following you around maybe go to another bar!”

Shooting

“Either use a cool glass—a coupe is a sexy choice—or a spirit with a rich, beautiful color. As with any type of mobile photography, natural light is a large chunk of the pie chart that makes up a good photograph. I will often use direct sunlight late in the day.”

Editing

“Enhance the image using an app like Snapseed (iOS and Android) or VSCO (iOS and Android). And don’t forget to enjoy the drink. Cheers!”

There was one part where we jump on a wire, and Chris fell one time and dropped out of frame somewhere, and I didn’t know where he went. There’s that scene where we blast through the two doors, and at one point, we couldn’t even get through them, and I was like, ‘Oh, here’s America’s hope! We can’t even break through a door.’

This image of sand by Yanping Wang won 14th Place in the Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition.

The competition recognizes excellence in photomicrography, honoring images that successfully showcase the delicate balance between difficult scientific technique and exquisite artistic quality. 

(see more photos from the competition here on Feature Shoot)

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The World is Flat with Martin Lanciano

To see more of Martin’s cleaned-up chaos follow @_o___________o_ on Instagram.

For graphic designer Martin Lanciano (@_o___________o_), photography is a way to create order from chaos. “I would love to live in a cleaner, less crowded place than Buenos Aires,” he says. “I’m not drawn to all these different architecture styles, colors and textures mixed together.” In his minimalist collage series #offlabeluse_, Martin flattens bulky pieces of medicine packaging and glues them to a thin sheet of paper. “With my pictures, I’m also slicing up the 3D volume of the real world and folding it into flat 2D squares.”

Martin’s photos focus on capturing clean bits of shape and color that he finds in his everyday life. “I’m not interested in the meaning of things or trying to convey a message or idea. As a graphic designer you have to do that,” he explains. “On Instagram, I feel free to just play. It’s like taking the serious part out of the graphic design and just keeping the fun! I try to focus on pure aesthetics such as balance, tension, contrast, empty space and color palette.”