feature debut

NU’ESTs records/Facts unique to them you might not have known!

-As some of you already know despite Nu’est being underrated they still have some records (I’ll put those in bold) and many things unique to them, so I’m making this list of info for new loves :)

- NU’EST is the first ever boy group from Pledis (debut 15th March 2012) and the 2nd ever Pledis group

-JR aka Kim Jonghyun was the first ever male trainee Pledis recruited (2009). He was casted on the street in his hometown and first thought he was being scammed lmao until he saw pictures of After School on the walls at Pledis HQ. 

(cute baby bugi)

-JR is the only Leader from a Pledis group who IS NOT the oldest member in the group (he is the 2nd oldest, Aron is NU’ESTs hyung born in 1993) 

-JR was called the ‘Male Kahi’ during debut

-His first MV appearance was pre-debut in Orange Caramel’s “Bangkok city” giving him the nickname ‘Bangkok city boy’ 

(15 year old JR check out those braids)

-JR felt lonely as the only male trainee for 1 Year, He had to eat instant ramen alone for that year (I guess Pledis was super broke)

-Mingi was the 2nd male trainee to Join Pledis in 2010, so JR wasn’t lonely anymore. Then Baekho joined, then Minhyun and lastly Aron joined NU’EST, possibly training for 6 months unto 1 year. 

- Minhyun’s first pre-debut MV appearance was in Orange Caramel’s “Shanghai Romance” giving him the nickname “Shanghai boy”

(I remember I was pissed seeing this kid reject Nana back then lol)

-Baekho made his first pre-debut MV appearance in After School’s “Play Ur Love”

(What! a! cutie!!

-JR had a pre-debut rap feature in UEE’s “Sok Sok Sok” and also featured in Gilme’s “Me First”  

-All of NU’EST + S.coups appeared in After School Blue’s “Wonder Boy” as backup dancers!

(Aron and Ren made their first appearances here)

- Aron rejected a place to study journalism at New York University (SUPER HARD to get into) to go to Korea and join NU’EST

-Aron got almost full marks on his SAT’s, but he said he’s bad at math so he failed the math questions

(Aron in high school) 

-Baekho’s stage name, meaning literally “white tiger” in Korean, was given to him by UEE, because apparently he looks like the character Kang Baekho from Slam dunk Manga lol

-NU’EST debut song “Face” was the most viewed kpop debut on youtube for years, and is still the most viewed kpop Boygroup debut MV all of time (almost 70m now)

- NU’EST “Face” was the best selling debut album of 2012

- During their debut, NU’EST was the group with the youngest overall age 

- JR is the Youngest Kpop Leader ever to debut (at the age of 16) 

Kid Leader —–> to Nation’s Leader

-NU’EST is the ONLY group ever where the Leader and Maknae are the same age! (Born 1995) 

(baby Jren ❤️ ) 

- Besides JYJ, NU’EST is the only boy group where at least 80% of the members are the same age.

-JR  and Aron have been writing rap lyrics for some years now (maybe 2014 or earlier) but in early 2016 their style changed drastically with the release of “Q is”. Baekho showed his composition skills and dream teamwork with Bumzu. 

-In the “Canvas” album the members were involved in every aspect of it, JR Aron Minhyun Ren and Baekho all wrote lyrics. Baekho was heavily involved in composition, Ren’s cousin made the album art (the illustrations) and Ren also helped in Styling and Minhyun wrote the song “Thank you” for loves.  

-Minhyun’s ultimate inspiration are ot5 TVXQ, his favourite song is “Love in the ice” and his Bias is Xiah Junsu 

-You likely already know, But Ren’s ultimate inspiration is Lady Gaga, like her he wants to be a strength for his fans.

-The song that helped JR get through hard times when he felt like giving up is DOK2′s “On my Way” when you listen to lyrics is clear how he relates to it

‘I have long ways to go and many walls to climb over

It has been eight years but everything is still the same

To make my dream comes true, still I’m on my way’

-In 2017 4 members of NU’EST joined Produce 101, they were the trainees with the most debut experience

-Aron did not go onto Produce 101 because of a leg injury. He stayed at the dorm and waited for them to come, cooking food for them when they did.

-Minhyun is the member of Wanna One with the most debut experience 

-On the PD101 final, instead of the show trending on Korean search engines, “NU’EST” and “Kim Jonghyun” trended no.1 and no.2 

-NU’EST is the only group to change their name/ become a unit (NU’EST W) because 1 member is not present.

-NU’EST W is the 3rd group ever to get over 100 million hearts on v-live

-’Hello’ has been nicknamed ‘Zombie-seyo’ because of the many many times it managed to climb the chart so high after so many years, peaking no.3 on melon on the night of pd101 final

-NU’EST W got their first no.1′s on charts with “If you” a song written for Minhyun

-Despite not even having a comeback yet, Korea and internationally NU’EST’s rise has been trending

-They have been crowded “Reversal Icons” 

Originally posted by hello-yeri

Originally posted by panwink

-Lastly, when Minhyun comes back, they will be 7 years old, and will likely become the group who took the longest time to get a win on a major Music show (assuming fans stay and make them stable for Minhyun’s return)

I made this to show you how long NU’EST have been in the industry, how long they have been chasing their dream.

I hope you learned something new about NU’EST! they deserve the world for their pure talent and all they have gone through, Please support them from now on <3

  • Ninjara: Guys, I have been waiting for the right moment to tell you that I am gay.
  • Ribbon Girl: That’s okay, we still love you.
  • Spring Man: I’m gay, too.
  • Kid Cobra: Me too.
  • Max Brass: Same.
  • Ninjara: Jesus Christ, does nobody here like girls?
  • Min Min: I do.
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Looking for more of Studio Ponoc’s feature film debut? The second full trailer for Mary and the Witch’s Flower is out today! The film will release July 2017 in Japan.

Read more about Studio Ponoc over at The Telegraph and ANN.

Horror parodies are seldom as funny, and never as scary, as fright-flicks that play their scares, er, straight. Jordan Peele — the shorter half of the 21st century’s funniest sketch-comedy duo — understands this, and that’s why Get Out, his debut feature as writer and director, is so truly, madly, mercilessly entertaining, even when it makes you want to jump out of your skin. It is small-c catholic in its tastes, liberally sampling elements of Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, Rosemary’s Baby and Invasion of the Body Snatchers before morphing into the most potent racial revenge fantasy since Django Unchained. But a parody it’s not: It’s as gnarly as Green Room, 2016’s nerviest thriller, whose villains wore their bigotry on their tattooed arms. What makes Get Out stand out is that its social critique — usually present in the horror-survival genre as subtext — is very much its text.

That’s a writing trick Peele and his creative partner, Keegan-Michael Key, used over and over again through five seasons of their marvelous Comedy Central series, one that boasted production values that stood head and shoulders above anything else in sketch TV. Key & Peele’s movie sendups looked like real movies, and now we have a good idea why: Peele is a world-class filmmaker. (Nearly all Key & Peele episodes were directed by Peter Atencio, who also directed the two comics in last year’s Keanu. That was a funny movie, but it had nothing like the invention, the intensity or the shimmering, righteous anger that Get Out possesses.) His movie is as much a triumph of craft as of inspiration.

‘Get Out’: A Terrifically Topical — And Terrifying — Satire

Photo: Justin Lubin/Universal Pictures

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Everywhere Styles goes, a screaming pack of One Direction fans follows. But, now that the shaggy-haired singer is set to make his feature debut in Christopher Nolan’s highly anticipated World War II film “Dunkirk,” his fans may well start screaming for a different reason. With no screen track record save for music videos, TV series like the U.K.’s “X Factor,” and a cameo in “Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie,” the question remains: Can Harry Styles act? Certainly that looks like a good bet, and he’ll be surrounded with a host of A-plus British talent including Mark Rylance, Tom Hardy, and Kenneth Branagh. Styles might well surprise fans and critics in “Dunkirk,” and, perhaps, launch a burgeoning film career.Will Thorne (x)

Jordan Peele’s horror flick “Get Out” is among the year’s biggest breakout hits. And with it, Peele has also surpassed a benchmark for box-office success.

“Get Out” has now earned more than $100 million at the box office, making Peele the first African-American writer-director to pass that threshold with his debut feature film.

Peele, who is most well-known as half of the comedy duo Key and Peele, wrote on Twitter that he’s “the first of many” such black writer-directors to hit that $100 million debut target. “Meaning I won’t be the last,” he added.

Read more here: “Get Out” and Jordan Peele just made movie history

Saturday Night Live will kick off its live-coast-to-coast shows next month with Harry Styles as musical guest for the Jimmy Fallon-hosted April 15 show. Styles, who rose to fame as one-fifth of One Direction — the British boy band that has assaulted pop charts around the world during the 2010s — is making his feature acting debut with a role in Christopher Nolan’s upcoming Dunkirk and might show off those chops in some skits.

Fallon’s previously announced hosting gig will mark the Tonight Show star’s third time fronting NBC’s SNL, following his six-season run as a castmember from 1998-2004. His appearance coincides with the launch of  “Race Through New York Starring Jimmy Fallon,” a thrill ride set to open April 6 at Universal Orlando Resort.

SNL said this month that it will wrap its 41st season with an unprecedented run of four episodes airing live in all four U.S. time zones.

Jennifer Morrison On Why She Is Leaving ‘Once Upon a Time’, Emma’s Final Battle & What’s Next

Emma Swan is leaving Storybrook. Jennifer Morrison announced this morning that she has declined ABC and Once Upon a Time creators Adam Horowitz and Edward Kitsis’ invitation to return next season, opting to depart the fairytale drama at the end of her current contract.

In an interview with Deadline, Morrison addressed the reasons for her decision to end her Once run after six seasons.

“I spent six years year on House, a year on How I Met Your Mother and spent 6 years on Once Upon a Time, and collectively that’s 13 years of network schedule, which is an amazing and incredible gift but it’s a grueling schedule,” Morrison said. “I’ve been transitioning into doing more directing, I’ve had some opportunities that I’ve passed up along the years in order to fulfill these network schedules, and I really had to weigh where I was in my life. I’m just at an age and a time in my life where I want to be home, I want to be with my family and my friends, to have a chance to have a personal life for a while, and also wanted to be available to do other creative things.”

Since wrapping Season 6 of Once about a month or so ago, Morrison worked on two films and is now in rehearsals starring opposite Matthew Perry in the off-Broadway production of his play The End of Longing. Her feature directing debut, Sun Dogs, is headed to the festival circuit, and she is looking at film and stage directing opportunities.

“It just felt like everything had come to a really nice place for Emma, and (Horowitz and Kitsis) had set themselves up to really revamp the show with new people in a really interesting creative way,” Morrison said. “It felt like time for me to come home.”

Morrison made her decision not to continue awhile back and shared it with the series’ producers but it was not made public until after last night’s musical/wedding episode, which Emma and Hook got married.

“(The producers) wanted to be careful to protect especially the musical episode, they wanted to withhold the information for a little while because they didn’t want to spoil the experience of the storytelling for the fans,” Morrison said. “Honestly I think they would’ve loved to have held it until the season finale but it was getting to the point where the information was in the universe and it was about to come out.”

In her Instagram post, Morrison said that she will return for one episode if Once is renewed for a seventh season. Would she be open to doing more?

“All I can say is that I only negotiated for one episode, and that’s all I can promise at this point,” she said.

Here is what Morrison had to say about the the upcoming conclusion of Season 6, which will be culminating with the final battle between Emma and the Black Fairy.

“It’s tough to do that without giving anything away,” Morrison said. “What I can say is that I feel like everything culminates in a way that I feel is very true to Emma’s story and true to everything that she’s been through. I thought (Horowitz and Kitsis), as always, came up with something that was really creative and inventive in terms of what it was that Emma really has to face in order to fight the final battle. I’m very pleased with how they’ve written the character and how they have everything play out in the last couple of episodes.”

What will Morrison miss about Emma the most?

“It’s very rare that you get to play such a strong smart and vulnerable character,” Morrison said. “I really love that she is a whole person and that she struggles with things, and she fails, and she has the courage to overcome them, fight to be a better person, fight to be vulnerable and to let people in. I’ll miss pretty much everything about her. It’s been truly, truly incredible to have the honor to be Emma for six years.”

What was Morrison’s favorite Once episode/scene?

“It was definitely very special to do the musical episode and have Emma marry Hook in it,” Morrison said. “I think it was such a beautiful culmination of her journey. The scene in the Mayor’s office where she realizes that that song would unleash some power in her to be able to fight the final battle and to have strength against the Black Fairy — I really saw that as her true, true transition from the ugly duckling to the swan, her final step of really embracing who she truly is and truly embracing the power that she has within her. I thought the song was beautiful, I loved that scene, and then I also really loved the wedding scene.

When we met Emma six years ago, she was so so guarded that it was so hard to imagine her walking down the aisle so vulnerable, so open and so truly in love and surrounded by her family and all these people she’s been through so much with. I loved to have had the opportunity to play this character who could grow so much in these six years it gives me a lot of hope for life in general.”

As an actress, what kind of role would she like to play in the future?

“Deep down there is a little part of me that wants to do a period piece, I think that would be fun but it has to be the right project,” Morrison said.

[x]

anonymous asked:

letterboxd is asking its community for their lists of most remarkable feature debuts. so what is your top 10 most remarkable debuts from women directors?

SUPER FUN QUESTION.

Also I feel like I could give like 10 answers from last year alone but I’ll try to contain myself. (J/K I CAN’T CONTAIN MYSELF, GET READY FOR THE NOVEL!)

Clip dir. Maja Milos (2012)
Imagine a more brutal version of Thirteen set in the social media era in Serbia and you have Clip, a brutal movie about a 14 year old girl who engages in a highly sexualized and often violent relationship with one of her classmates. It’s a shocking watch especially because Milos doesn’t try to protect her lead character (played by an actual 14 year old) at all and doesn’t shield her (or the audience) from the sado-masochistic behaviour she engages in in order to get attention and feel love.

My Brilliant Career dir. Gillian Armstrong (1979)
So this is like the stereotypical period piece about a plucky young woman discovering herself only it’s SO MUCH BETTER THAN THAT. A really beautiful and quietly subversive period piece that is so visually stunning and self-assured that it doesn’t feel like a first film at all. A must see.

Titus dir. Julie Taymor (1999)
When people say that a movie is like a theatre piece they usually mean it as an insult but Titus applies the “anything goes” spirit of theatre in the most fun and flamboyant way. This is a really bombastic, unforgettable visual adaptation of one of Shakespeare’s lesser known plays. Taymor mixes genres, time periods and references in a way that is intensely fresh and unique.  

Fill the Void dir. Rama Burshstein (2012)
This is a romantic drama about a young Israeli woman who is part of an Orthodox Jewish community who, after her sister dies, is prompted to consider marrying her sister’s widower so that he can remain in the family. Despite the icky sounding premise Burshtein (herself an Orthodox Jew) is intensely sympathetic to her characters and shows a total command of her camera and the tone of the movie which is just beautiful, passionate and romantic.

The Connection dir. Shirley Clarke (1961)
This is a bit of a cheat because Shirley Clarke had directed documentaries before but whatever. The Connection takes place in real time and is about a very square documentarian who is filming a movie about a bunch of jazz musicians waiting around for their drug connection so they can get high. It definitely feels very tame for the current day but considering the film takes place in a single room Clarke packs the movie full of electric energy that makes it incredibly pleasurable to watch.

The Fits dir. Anna Rose Holmer (2015)
This is just an incredible majestic film. Very spare, very artistic, very beautiful. Holmer is a genius and the movie is a gift. She does more on a budget of 150, 000 euros or whatever it was, than most directors do with millions.

Songs My Brothers Taught Me dir. Chloé Zhao (2015)
There is a whole cottage industry of low budget filmmakers who think they can be the next Malick, but I think Zhao is the only one who really gets it right. This film is set in on the Pine Ridge reservation and Zhao shoots everything at the golden hour making it look incredibly lush while never shying away from the roughness and occasional boredom of small town life.

The Governess dir. Sandra Goldbacher (1998)
I have literally no idea why this film isn’t bigger than it is and it’s really due for a critical revival. It’s a neo-victorian original tale about a young Sephardic Jewish woman who hides her identity and goes to work as a governess on the Isle of Skye. Unfortunately the only copies I’ve been able to view are of very poor quality but you can still see how beautiful it must have originally been. Also the story is incredibly rich and textured and deals with power dynamics between men and women, Jews and gentiles, science vs. art etc.  

The Babadook dir. Jennifer Kent (2014)
This is a horror movie for people who aren’t really into horror and as such it’s PERFECT. What it really is more than anything is a dark modern day fairy tale about a recently widowed woman who is having a tough time adjusting to life as a single mother to her child who is genuinely the most annoying child to ever grace the screen (really, kudos to casting, you completely understand why this woman would struggle to raise this kid).

A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night dir. Ana Lily Amirpour (2014)
So good. A surprisingly wistful and romantic vampire film in which “the girl” (the vampire) skateboards in a chador, dances alone in her room, befriends a cat, and drinks the blood of a LOT of people. It’s great.

Honourable mentions: La Pointe Courte, Children of a Lesser God, The Edge of Seventeen, Sugar Cane Alley, Smithereens, Eve’s Bayou, I Like It Like That, Hester Street, A New Leaf, Chocolat.

bbc.co.uk
God’s Own Country is Britain’s answer to Brokeback Mountain
From the Berlin Film Festival, this outstanding debut film is a ‘thrillingly real story of gay love’, writes Jessica Kiang.
By Jessica Kiang

Under battered Yorkshire skies, with grime beneath its nails and soil clodding up the treads of its boots, Francis Lee’s outstanding feature debut God’s Own Country is a work of rough-hewn alchemy. But instead of gold, from the muck and straw it spins a thrillingly real story of gay love. It will inevitably invite comparisons with Ang Lee’s Brokeback Mountain — at times it almost actively courts them — but seldom has a film or its characters felt less derivative.

In any case, this isn’t only a love story. It is also an immigrant tale and an unflinching portrait of rural farm life where the war between tradition and change is bitter and has real casualties. And in Josh O'Connor (Peaky Blinders) the film finds a central performance of such authenticity and naturalism that is feels like it grew there, planted some years ago, with a root system that extends for miles under these forbiddingly lovely moors.

The film’s sense of place recalls Andrea Arnold’s viscerally damp and windswept Wuthering Heights

This sense of place, and of tactile immediacy in the detail and dirt of its wild location, at times recalls Andrea Arnold’s viscerally damp and windswept take on Wuthering Heights, but there is nothing ethereal about Lee’s vision of rural life. Instead he finds beauty in details of skin, fur, ordure, spit, vomit, semen, mucus and afterbirth. Here the ‘miracle of birth’ and the ‘circle of life’ are captured in shots of chickens pecking at eggshells, ewes licking the mucus from their newborns, or, during one exceptional sequence, a dead lamb being briskly skinned and its hide used to clothe a runt, so that it will be accepted by the bereaved mother.

In fact the first animal birth that happens here is an abortive one: Johnny (O'Connor) is away bringing a cow to market, and having an anonymous, illicit sexual encounter with a young man he meets there, while back on the farm the pregnant cow to whom he had been tending, dies in the process of giving birth to a half-dead calf. His father Martin (Ian Hart) whose failing health necessitates the use of two walking sticks, unambiguously blames his son and leaves the mercy killing of the calf to him.

‘Animalistically sexual’

Surly, scowling Johnny lives on the inexorably failing livestock farm with his father and grandmother (a terrific Gemma Jones) in an atmophere of mutual hostility and barked-out orders reluctantly followed. Martin, all but incapacitated, hires a Romanian migrant worker to help out for a week during lambing season and when Gheorghe (Alec Secareanu) arrives, it seems at first like he will be just another reason for resentment. Johnny, who gets so blind drunk in the pub most nights that his mornings are spent vomiting, is openly hostile to him, as well as sneeringly dismissive of his old friends from the region who have gone away to college. The only hint we get that there was ever anything more to Johnny than this unprepossessing truculence is at the pub, when an old acquaintance urges him to join her and her college mate for a drink: “He’s really funny. You know, like you used to be.”

For his part, Gheorghe takes uncomplainingly to the privations of this isolated location, sleeping in a chilly caravan in the courtyard and passing the days working with Johnny mostly in silence. But he is good at the tasks required of him, not just the fence-mending and wall-repairing but the real business of lambing. And during a few days spent away from the farmhouse, in the hills looking after the sheep, living on off-brand pot noodles and sleeping next to each other in a ramshackle outbuilding, Johnny and Gheorghe’s relationship becomes first animalistically sexual (their first roll in the hay is notable for the lack of hay: they rut in the dirt) and then, astonishingly to Johnny, loving. Under the influence of sudden happiness, manifested in night-time trysts and secret smiles (though perhaps not so secret to Nan’s sharp eyes) Johnny’s imperceptible ugly duckling transformation is a quiet joy to behold.

Maybe it’s time to let gay love stories be gay love stories, to apologise for their themes as little as God’s Own Country does

In the past, when faced with ‘gay films’ of the calibre of Moonlight, Carol, the upcoming Sundance wonder Call Me By Your Name or, now, God’s Own Country – films that tell their stories with tenderness and insight and without a scintilla of camp – the tendency in reviewing has been to somehow claim them ‘for everyone who has ever loved’ or ‘for cinema’, in such a way that defines ‘cinema’ as a broadly heterosexual endeavour, and denies their essential queerness. There is a place for that project – there is sociological importance, not to mention a financial imperative, in presenting gay stories in a way that universalises that experience for a wider (read: predominantly heterosexual) audience. But it can’t help but feel like maybe the time for that fastidiousness is past. Maybe it’s time to let gay love stories be gay love stories, to apologise for their themes as little as God’s Own Country does.

Unlike so many films in this category, this is not about coming out, at least not in the traditional sense — Johnny’s sexuality is a pre-established fact, however unspoken it may be in that household. If anything, it portrays a painfully, magnificently real character coming out as worthy of love, like it’s a gift he didn’t know he wanted and could never have believed he deserved. It’s not despite Johnny’s gayness, but because of it that the journey is so captivating.

The Flash Ep 4x05 is titled “Girls Night Out”

According to EW, the fifth episode of The Flash S4, “Girls Night Out”, will feature the debut of a new badass female villain named Amunet Black aka Blacksmith, played by Katee Sackoff. Blacksmith runs the underground black market for super villains.

Girls Night Out is also a mini crossover with Arrow with Felicity Smoak paying a visit to Central City (why? just because? Iris’ bachelorette??)This has the potential to be a strong Ladies episode. Female villain versus Iris, whatever version of Caitlin shows up, hopefully Cynthia, and Felicity Smoak to be the “Cisco” and help with the tech side. It would be kinda cool if the ladies were looking to have a relaxing/fun night out and wind up stopping a criminal underlord on their own.

side note: I wonder if Sterling wrote this ep…I remember he wanted to write a comics storyline focusing on Lois, Iris, and some other DC ladies, and never got the chance….

Raw will be released in select theaters on March 10 via Focus Features’ Focus World. It will debut on VOD in the summer. It gained notoriety on the festival circuit earlier this year, when viewers fainted at screenings.

The French-Belgian cannibal film marks the feature directorial debut of Cannes Film Festival winner Julia Ducournau. Garance Marillier stars.

Expect a trailer in the near future. Until then, we have the trailer above and the synopsis below.

Justine commences her studies at veterinary school to follow in her family members’ footsteps. Raised as a vegetarian, Justine is pressured at school to try meat for the first time. Once she does, she plumbs both the depths of her own soul and tests the limits of her darkest cravings.