fbi police

6

Brave local and Federal Law Enforcement officers secure the road to the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge center currently under siege by radical extremists in Oregon.

4

They go by many names,

They come from all backgrounds,

But they all have one job in common,

Protecting life.

ATTENTION!!!
If you hold a passport from the following countries and you are not a U.S. citizen, please feel free to contact CUNY CLEAR for free legal advice:
• Iran
• Iraq
• Somalia
• Sudan
• Syria
• Yemen
The number is 718-348-4558
Green card holders who are denied entry or detained should resist any CBP demands to give up their green cards.
Do NOT sign Form I-407. Even if they say it will make things easier. DEMAND a hearing before an immigration judge.
Additionally, if your mosque or community organization would like to organize a «Know Your Rights» workshop, CLEAR offers workshops on 4 main topic areas:
1) How to exercise your rights in the face of police or FBI questioning
2) What your rights are at the airport and while traveling
3) How to give to charities without running afoul of complex federal laws
4) What to do if you have concerns about informants in your community
We can provide literature or trainings in many languages, including Arabic, Bangla, English, French, Spanish, and Urdu.
You can contact CLEAR at cunyclear@mail.law.cuny.edu or (718) 340-4558
Feel free to copy and paste the above information as your own status message to distribute to those who may need it.

one thing that I like about POI is that the main characters don’t follow the traditional rules of the american vigilante narrative. usually the narrative is that government agencies like police or FBI don’t stop the villains because they’re clogged with bureaucracy and essentially useless, a narrative that unfortunately has fed into our current trump political climate. in POI, while there are extenuating circumstances like the Machine, it’s not about government agencies being inefficient–-it’s about them being corrupt and self-interested and poisoned by a post 9/11 mindset. the show is very self-aware and pulls no punches about police forces or military corruption, and also walks a fine line for the protagonists who, thanks to the Machine, are not limited by rules or laws, but instead follow their judgement and morals based on the situation. this is different from other rule-breaking vigilantes who usually have one goal and don’t deviate from it no matter who gets in their way, and are punished by the narrative for it by having their loved ones die (taking something from them). this is an immature perspective of masculinity too prevalent in american media, making everyone but the protagonist an enemy. meanwhile in POI, team machine works together, albeit with a very small drawing pool of trusted allies, and act according to the situation, sometimes bending their own rules (and traditional american tropes) to help people. it’s just a much more mature, smart way of dealing with the material, sometimes too smart (which led to its decline on network tv) and I just appreciate the writing so much

5

Executive Order 9066

February 19, 2017 marks the 75th anniversary of FDR signing Executive Order 9066 into law.

Why Did FDR Issue Executive Order 9066?

After the Pearl Harbor attack, public fear and anger quickly turned on people of Japanese ancestry. These emotions stemmed, in part, from long-standing racial prejudices and rumors and accusations that predated December 7.

President Roosevelt and many of his military advisers had long worried about the loyalty of Japanese Americans. The Office of Naval Intelligence kept tabs on Japanese communities as early as 1936 and FDR ordered the creation of lists of Japanese Americans in Hawaii to be interned in an emergency. In 1940, Congress enacted the Alien Registration Act. It required adult resident aliens to register annually with the government.

On December 7, 1941, the FBI and local police began raiding homes to detain suspicious Japanese aliens, along with smaller numbers of German and Italian aliens.  

In the coming weeks, suspicion of Japanese Americans increased. West Coast newspapers, military leaders, and political figures, including California Attorney General Earl Warren (a future U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice) claimed there was no way to distinguish loyal and disloyal Japanese Americans.

During this period, FDR received contradictory advice about further action. Military advisers recommended barring persons of Japanese descent, including American citizens, from the West Coast as a safeguard against espionage and sabotage. The Justice Department initially questioned the necessity of such action.  

But the shock of Pearl Harbor and subsequent Japanese advances and atrocities in the Philippines fueled already tense race relations. In the face of political, military, and public pressure, Roosevelt approved the military’s proposal.

What Did the Executive Order Do?

Executive Order 9066 authorized the military to exclude “any or all persons” from areas of the United States designated as “military areas.”

Although the order did not identify any particular group, it was designed to remove—and eventually used to incarcerate—Japanese aliens and American citizens of Japanese descent. President Roosevelt’s order did not lead to mass removals of the large Japanese American population in Hawaii. Enormous logistical obstacles and worries about the impact on the islands’ economy made that impractical. But it was applied on America’s West Coast.

On March 2, 1942, Lieutenant General John L. DeWitt, head of the military’s Western Defense Command, issued a proclamation establishing two military areas.  Military Area 1 consisted of the western half of Washington, Oregon, and California (and the southern half of Arizona). Military Area 2 comprised the remainder of these states.

Later that month, the military announced plans to remove all people of Japanese descent from Military Area 1. They later extended the plans to include the portion of California in Military Area 2.  The removal—which the government termed an “evacuation”—began that month. Eventually, approximately 110,000 individuals were transported to government camps in remote inland areas. Nearly all those incarcerated there were from the West Coast, but smaller numbers came from Hawaii and Alaska and others were later born in the camps. The total number of people confined was approximately 120,000. Roughly two-thirds were American citizens.

cnn.com
What the last 48 hours told us about Trump's next 4 years
President-elect Donald Trump went nose-to-nose Wednesday with a press corps itching to cross-examine him after more than five months at arm's length, while his top nominees faced off with senators during a strategic crush of confirmation hearings.
By Gregory Krieg, CNN
  1. Donald Trump still hates the press, except for Fox News and Breitbart.
  2. Trump’s Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, is so supportive of Russia and Trump’s buddy Vladimir Putin that he refuses to condemn Russia’s murdering journalists and bombing civilians.
  3. Trump’s Attorney General, Jeff Sessions, will not pursue alleged civil rights violations by police and police departments.
  4. FBI director James Comey, asked whether the FBI was investigating the Trump campaign’s alleged contacts with Russia, refused to comment: “Especially in a public forum, we never confirm or deny a pending investigation.” (Except, of course, when it’s Hillary Clinton.)
Hannibal Rewatch meets Hannibal Advent: Fromage

Hannibal

Will.

Bach pulses through his mind, each tremulous note a single word, repeated. Will. Eyes locked on the doorway.

Pretending - to be upset about the broken bodies and bloodstains on the carpet (although one niggle - blood’s hellishly difficult to remove).

Not pretending - to yearn for the face he cherishes above all others to appear.

Carefully he picks up shards of recent conversation, turns them over in his mind. 

Possibility of friendship…

Requires trust…

What I want…

Someone worthy…

Guilt, unfamiliar, pricks. Then relief, overwhelming. Will, alive. Will, concerned and tender. Smiling. Hannibal sighs, eyes glistening surety.

Trusted.

Wanted.

Worthy.

Will.

Will

Another crime scene; another body count. As always, Will tunes out Jack’s grouching and the organised chaos of police, FBI, First Responders. But no pendulum today; no urge to recreate Budge’s spiteful finale. Will’s only thought is for the traumatised man whose relief-filled gaze snared him the moment he walked in.

Hannibal.

Everything else fades away as he perches on the edge of the desk and notes with concern the blood streaks on Hannibal’s forehead. Squashes the urge to grab a med-kit and clean him up a bit.

It’s enough to be here for him.

It’s enough to be close. 

ATTENTION!!!

If you hold a passport from the following countries and you are not a U.S. citizen, please feel free to contact CUNY CLEAR for free legal advice:
• Iran
• Iraq
• Somalia
• Sudan
• Syria
• Yemen

The number is 718-348-4558

Green card holders who are denied entry or detained should resist any CBP demands to give up their green cards.

Do NOT sign Form I-407. Even if they say it will make things easier. DEMAND a hearing before an immigration judge.

Additionally, if your mosque or community organization would like to organize a «Know Your Rights» workshop, CLEAR offers workshops on 4 main topic areas:
1) How to exercise your rights in the face of police or FBI questioning
2) What your rights are at the airport and while traveling
3) How to give to charities without running afoul of complex federal laws
4) What to do if you have concerns about informants in your community

We can provide literature or trainings in many languages, including Arabic, Bangla, English, French, Spanish, and Urdu.
You can contact CLEAR at cunyclear@mail.law.cuny.edu or (718) 340-4558

(Snagged from Facebook, going around as a copy/paste status)

It would have been the most expensive bottle of soft drink in history. A secretary at Coca-Cola’s global headquarters has been arrested for stealing a phial of a secret new product, hiding it in a brown Armani bag and attempting to sell it for $1.5m (£800,000) to the world’s second biggest cola maker, Pepsi. SOURCE

Keep reading

The DOJ has replaced the team reviewing Eric Garner’s death

The Department of Justice recently moved to replace the New York-based team of agents and lawyers investigating Eric Garner’s case. The FBI agents handling the case were swapped out for agents from outside New York. In order to mount a civil rights case, the investigating agents need specific evidence.

follow @the-movemnt

Mafia AU Aqours featuring FBI AZALEA, Police CYaRon! and our beloved expert mafia, Guilty Kiss

P.S : Never let Mari drives your car with Riko and Yoshiko Yohane tagging along if you don’t want your ears bleed from their bloody screams