fayr

anonymous asked:

Okay I don't know if anyone has commented on this before but I was just reading someone else's theories and they brought up the meaning of Feyre's name and how it is from an old fae dialect. Now, out of the context of the book, Fayre is an actual old English name meaning fair one/ beautiful (I spend a lot of time on baby naming sites/ looking up old medieval names). Do you think SJM's variation would have a similar meaning for the fae then, or just another sly nod to Beauty and the Beast?

So I 100% believe that the meaning of the name is a nod to the various fairytales in the spectrum of mode of Beauty and the Beast. 

BUT I also 100% believe that it means something within the context of the book. Because both Amarantha and the Bone Carver turn over Feyre’s name and think about it. I think Amarantha even actually says it’s an old name. 

Layers. The name has layers. 

And when the Bone Carver says it, he’s like “Fey-ruh” and pulls the beginning out. 

And just as a general FYI “fey” is an actual word. It’s an adjective that means:

giving an impression of vague unworldliness: his mother was a strange, fey woman.

• having supernatural powers of clairvoyance.

chiefly Scottish fated to die or at the point of death: now he is fey, he sees his own death, and I see it too.

Now all of these meanings can be applied to the name, right? And some of them sit canonically. Feyre is a bit clairvoyant. She sees several things before they happen in the story. She is kind of unworldly isn’t she—being of all seven courts? And the Scottish meaning “fated to die” well. She did die, didn’t she. And I’m going to NOT make a reference to @sparkleywonderful‘s theory that she might die again/be unmade. Because it hurts me and I refuse to even entertain that shit.

So, layers. The name has layers. As do most things with Maas. And this is why I sometimes get annoyed with people so knock others in the fandom for coming up with theories (even if they’re off the wall and ridiculous—I’ve written a few. LOL). Because Maas does layer things on purpose. Somethings can totally be coincidence, but they’re also informed by tropes, and common narratives, and embodied experiences with the visual world etc. that all inform stories and storytelling.

Listen to the Playmoss playlist: Spring equnox by witchyfashionmusic by witchyfashionmusic
LISTEN



Lindsey Stirling - Beyond The Veil
Emilie Autumn - What If
Celtic Women - Fairies
Laura Wright - Down By The Salley Gardens
Mediaeval Baebes - Sunrise
Lisa Thiel - Ostara (Spring Song)
The Cranberries - Just My Imagination
Scarborough Fayre - Mediaevil Baebes
Rapunzel - Emilie Autumn
Senbonzakura - cover by Lindsey Stirling

8

18 February 1516 – The birth of a fair princess

In the early hours of 18th February 1516, at Greenwich Palace, “was borne a fayre prynces and christened with great solempnitie, and named Mary.” This little girl was the future Queen Mary I.

Mary was baptised on 20th February 1516 in the Church of the Observant Friars at Greenwich. The little princess was carried to the font by the Countess of Surrey and her godparents were Catherine Courtenay, Countess of Devon and daughter of Edward IV; Margaret Pole, Countess of Salisbury and daughter of George, Duke of Clarence; the Duchess of Norfolk, and Cardinal Thomas Wolsey.

She was the only surviving child of King Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon and the first queen to rule England in her own right. Mary was crowned on October 1553 and reigned until her death in 1558 at St. James Palace in London

I feel like we need to discuss someone that might have been forgotten

PLEASE NOTE: MAJOR SPOILER WARNING FOR SARAH J MAAS’S “A COURT OF WINGS AND RUIN” (ACOWAR). (I’ll be putting most of this below in the Read More section)

I feel like we got a lot of information and foreshadowing in this book and so far I’ve seen two posts that have been on my same path of thinking. I’ve made predictions for this series with my friends before and ended up being either dead on or pretty damn close to what actually happened so I wanted to share what I came up with with all of you. 

I wanna talk about Briar. 

I think she’s gonna be Tamlin’s Mate.

Keep reading

“THIS PRECIOUS MARGAREYTE IS PAST FROM THIS WORLDE, NOT AS OTHER FFLOURES BE THAT TO DAY BE FAYRE, AND TO MOROWE WITHERED AND DRYE, BUT THIS OURE FAYRE FLOURE AS LONG AS THE SEA HATH FYSHES, AND THE SKYE TWINKLING STARRES, UNTYLL THE SOUNDE OF THE LAST TROMPET SHALL CALL ALL CREATURES TO JUDGEMENT, HER FAME, HER HONOUR, HER LIBERALITYE, HER PRUDENCE, HER CHASTYTYE & HER EXCELLENT VERTUE SHALL BE COMENDYD FOR  EUER”  

Happy 574th birthday to Margaret Beaufort.
A woman who was maritally raped at  12 went through a horrendous body-damaging birth at 13, had to marry no less than four times, because of politics and the need to survive, and spent half her life fighting for the freedom and return of her only son.
A woman who believed having a lot of money was God’s way of using you to help the poor and less fortunate, who took in the homeless, cared for the sick, who allowed anyone to eat and drink at her table at Christmas, who threw the best parties that food made the table groan with the weight of it.
A woman who was an advocate of other women, giving money so poor women could get married, defending and helping Cecily when she married against the king’s wishes, protected her granddaughter from being maritally raped as she was.
A woman who was intelligent and helped found colleges at Cambridge and Oxford, who translated books from French into English, who supported and funding the development of the printing press, who encouraged the access of knowledge and reading to all.
A woman who was smart enough to make alliances where others hadn’t, who secretly communicated with Elizabeth Woodville for an outcome that benefited them both, who continued to fight for her son even when everything was taken from her.
  A woman who survived the constant political upheaval throughout her life, survived an attainder of treason, survived changing of kings, survived a horrific birth, survived being parted from her son, survived seeing loved ones die around her, including her own beloved son. 

A woman who is now portrayed in popular culture as a multiple murderer, a borderline sociopath, and a mean-spirited over-ambitious religious nut. 

Happy Birthday, Margaret, and also sincere apologies on behalf of historical inaccurate media.