fayette me

So - we all love Lafayette’s love letters to Washington, right?

Let’s take a look at Washington’s letters to Lafayette today.

Washington to Lafayette (31 December 1777)

My Dear Marquis,

Your favour of Yesterday conveyed to me fresh proof of that friendship and attachment which I have happily experienced since the first of our acquaintance, and for which I entertain sentiments of the purest affection. It will ever constitute part of my happiness to know that I stand well in your opinion

Washington to Lafayette (4 July 1779)

When my dear Marquis shall I embrace you again? Shall I ever do it? or has the charms of the amiable & lovely Marchioness—or the smiles and favors of your Prince with-drawn you from us entirely? 

Washington to Lafayette (18 March 1780)

Your polite and obliging letter of the 10th of Octr from Havre came to my hands since the beging of this month—It filled me with pleasure intermixed with pain—To hear that you were well—to find you breathing the same affectione sentiments that ever have most conspicuously, markd your conduct towards me & that you continued to deliver them with unabated attachmt contributes greatly to my happiness—On the other hand, to hear that not one of the many letters which I have written to you since you left this Continent had arrived safe was not only surprizing but mortifying

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I have been thus particular My dear friend that in case there should be the least suspicion of my want of friendship or want of attention, it may be totally removed; as it is my earnest wish to convince you by every testimony that an affectionate regard can dictate, of my sincere attachment to your person—and fortunes.

Washington to Lafayette (1 February 1784)

I thank you most sincerely My Dear Marqs for your kind invitation to your house, if I should come to Paris. At present I see but little prospect of such a voyage, the deranged situation of my private concerns, occasioned by an absence of almost nine years, and an entire disregard of all private business during that period, will not only suspend, but may put it forever out of my power to gratify this wish. This not being the case with you, come with Madame la Fayette & view me in my domestic walks—I have often told you, & I repeat it again, that no man could receive you in them with more friendship & affection than I should do

Washington to Lafayette (8 December 1784)

In the moment of our separation upon the road as I travelled, & every hour since—I felt all that love, respect & attachment for you, with which length of years, close connexion & your merits, have inspired me. I often asked myself, as our Carriages distended, whether that was the last sight, I ever should have of you? And tho’ I wished to say no—my fears answered yes.

Washington to Lafayette (15 February 1785)

My Dr Marqs

I have had the pleasure to receive your affectionate letter of the 21st of December—dated on board the Nymph Frigate in the harbour of New York; & felt all that man could feel from the flattering expression of it.

Washington to Lafayette (15 August 1786)

You will see by the length to which I have extended this letter, that I can never find myself weary of conversing with you. Adieu, my Dr Marqs—Mrs Washington & the family desire to be most respectfully presented to Mad[am]e de la Fayette—to whom, I pray you also to offer my very best homage; & to believe that I am, My Dr Marqs &c. &c. &c. - G: Washington

Washington to Lafayette (11 August 1790)

Adieu, my dear Marquis! Believe me to be assuredly and affectionately Your friend and humble Servant - G. Washington

P.S. Not for the value of the thing, my dear Marquis, but as a memorial and because they are the manufacture of this City, I send you herewith a pair of shoe buckles

Washington to Lafayette (19 March 1791)

The tender concern, which you express on my late illness, awakens emotions which words will not explain, and to which your own sensibility can best do justice—My health is now quite restored, and I flatter myself with the hope of a long exemption from sickness.

Washington to Lafayette (28 July 1791)

Knox, Jay, Hamilton, Jefferson remember you with affection—but none with more sincerity and true attachment than, My dear Sir, Your affectionate - G. Washington

and finally the last words of the last letter Washington wrote to Lafayette (25 December 1798)

I shall now only add what you knew well before, that with the most sincere friendship, & affectionate regard—I am always Yours - Go: Washington

Visited my friends at Fishkill, and by the request of Colonel Gibson, I waited on the Marquis de la Fayette. The colonel furnished me with a letter of introduction, and his compliments, with inquiries respecting the Marquis’s health. I was received by this nobleman in a polite and affable manner. He is just recovering from a fever, and was in his chair of convalescence. He is nearly six feet high, large but not corpulent, being not more than twenty one years of age. He is not very elegant in his form, his shoulders being broad and high, nor is there a perfect symmetry in his features, his forehead is remarkably high, his nose large and long, eyebrows prominent and projecting over a fine animated hazel eye. His countenance is interesting and impressive. He converses in broken English, and displays the manners and address of an accomplished gentleman. Considering him a French nobleman of distinguished character, and a great favorite of General Washington, I felt myself highly honored by this interview
— 

A Military Journal During the American Revolutionary War, from 1775 to 1783
By James Thacher

Dated November 27th 1777

Rescue Me |Open|

Fayette frowned as she walked through the dark alley to her.. living space. She could hear faint footsteps behind her, but tried to ignore them. She turned back onto the street, continuing her trek home when the footsteps started to speed up. She froze in her walk home, turning her head slightly, her ears twitching. “Are.. you f-following m-me?” She whimpered, twirling around quickly and narrowing her eyes at the person. He didn’t speak, but instead shot forward, grabbing onto Fayette’s tail and tugging harshly. She squealed and tried to pull her tail out of his grasp. “A-ah! Help!”