favorite comics of all time

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ok but his bed hair must be impossible to fix

I thought I’d finish at least one thing in between studying ;w; 

someone please burn down my uni 

also:

..though her hair isn’t any better

My Top 10 Favorite Comics of All Time

Hi guys,

I’ve been getting asked a lot on and offline what are my favorite comic books? That’s a loaded question. I had to think about it. There are some great runs in comics. Some great story arcs. But I had to dig down and see what I really liked. What books have I read over and over and over. These are what I enjoyed the most, I’m not saying these are the greatest comic books ever, I’m just saying they appealed to me. So here are my top 10 favorite comics.




10. Identity Crisis
The DC Comics crisis events. Mostly just okay stories. Too much going on and not enough time to invest in any one character. But Identity Crisis stands out above the rest. Instead of a multiverse changing, massive story, Identity Crisis focuses on the mystery of who killed Sue Dibny. The wife of the Elongated Man. More and more of the heroes civilian loved ones are attacked and the heroes have a ticking clock to solve the mystery before another loved one is murdered. Written by Brad Meltzer this book focuses on the cost of living a double life. Highly recommended.



9. Young Avengers: volume 2
Not to be confused with Young Avengers volume 1. Volume 2 by Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie is nothing short of awesome. A multiverse hoping, teenage super hero daydream. It’s a really great story about teenage love, magic, pop references, LGB, and Loki. Lots and lots of Loki. So if you ship Wiccan and Hulkling, love Kate Bishop, and cannot get enough of America Chavez, you’ll want to read this book.



8. Superman American Alien
A lot of people have mixed opinions on this book, but I really enjoyed this unique take written by Max Landis. Focusing on the early years of Clark Kent, it felt more grounded in what Clark would actually be going through on his journey to becoming Superman. Each issue has a different artist which is fitting because each issue focuses on a different year in Clark’s child to teenager to young adult to man journey. It’s a mini series that should be pretty easy to find and I highly recommend it.



7. DC The New Frontier
A book paying tribute to the Silver Age of DC Comics. Focusing on the Macarthy era, A time where America couldn’t be less trusting, the story focuses on the super heroes once praised for their services, now find themselves ridden off as outlaws. Multiple perspectives from Hal Jordan (Green Lantern), Martian Manhunter, Wonder Woman, Flash, etc, as they fight for truth, justice, and the American way, accumulating to the upcoming battle with “The Center.” Darwyn Cooke tells an amazing story that you all should check out.



6. Scott Pilgrim Vol 1 through 6
I cannot recommend these books from Bryan Lee O’ Malley enough. 6 graphic novels in total, focusing on Scott Pilgrim’s desire to date Ramona Flowers, his journey to defeat her 7 evil ex’s, and the challenge of being a responsible adult. This book is filled with post high school confusion, punk rock, video games, anime style action, and heart. If you liked the movie, I promise you, you’ll love the book.



5. Ultimate Comics Spider-Man volume 2
My favorite super hero is Spider-Man. In 2011 when they announced they would be making a new Spider-Man of color I was ecstatic. As a person of color it’s been great to have a Spider-Man that fills that need for minority characters. Obviously just having a minority character isn’t enough but Brian Michael Bendis’s run on Ultimate Comics Spider-Man makes you really love the character of Miles Morales. The story of what happens after Peter Parker dies and a new clueless Spider-Man must fill the void, is nothing short of great. It puts you in the shoes of a new character trying to figure out who he is, all while trying to keep the memory of Peter Parker alive. 



4. Paper Girls
If you like the show “Stranger Things,” you’ll love Paper Girls. Taking place in the 1980s, 4 middle school girls, on their morning paper route get caught up in the strangest day of their lives. To ninjas, dinosaurs, time travel, clones, to apple products, Brian K. Vaughan and Cliff Chiang hit you with a sci-fi nostalgia story that will keep you guessing where the next turn is.




3. Justice League International
The late 80′s had one of the greatest Justice League runs of all time. Keith Giffen and J.M. Dematteis pumped out some of the funniest and most entertaining comics to date. Focusing on the Justice League as a work place comedy, this massive run follows the adventures of a newly formed Justice League made up of mostly second string characters. The satisfaction of Batman punching out Guy Gardner, the comedy duo of Blue Beetle and Booster Gold, GNORT! If you want your super hero books to be fun and hilarious, this is the book for you. Starting in Justice League #1 through 6 and transitioning to Justice League International, then splitting between Justice League Europe and Justice League America.



2. New Avengers
This comic book run written by Brian Michael Bendis is what got me back into comics after an 8 year absence. 6 months after the Avengers disbanded due to the Scarlet Witch killing some of her fellow teammates, a massive prison break, orchestrated by Electro forces Spider-Woman, Luke Cage, Daredevil, Spider-Man, Iron Man, Captain America, and the Sentry to come together to put an end to the riot. The book follows the newly formed team on their mission to track down the 42 escaped prisoners, all while trying to solve the mystery who hired Electro and why? New Avengers also brought some of the best characters in Marvel including Wolverine, Ms. Marvel, Hawkeye, Doctor Strange, Iron Fist, Jessica Jones, and more, to join the team. The book became the center stage for Marvel Comics from 2005 until 2012 running through events like House of M, Civil War, Secret Invasion, all the way to Avengers vs X-Men. It’s a fun super hero book that really throws you into the world of Marvel Comics.



HONORABLE MENTIONS
Black Science
Sex Criminals
New Teen Titans (Marv Wolfman)
Batgirl and the Birds of Prey
Uncanny X-Force (Rick Remender run)
Batgirl: Year One




AND NUMBER ONE….




1. Saga
If you’re not reading Saga, you are missing out. A Romeo and Juliet story set in a sci-fi fantasy space adventure. In the middle of an intergalactic war, Alona and Marko leave their worlds behind to risk everything for the survival and protection of their newborn Hazel. Hunted by both sides of the war, the two travel across the stars and encountering creatures from all over the galaxy who either want to help them or want them dead. Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples take a story about the ups and downs of parenting and throws it into a cosmic and crazy story of awesomeness. Look out for Izabel, Prince Robot the IV, and Ghus. You will smile every time they are on the page.

every once in a while i remember the tf2 comics and I’m hit with a wave of reliving how fucking amazing and hilarious their storytelling is

honestly those have to be my favorite comics of all time

anonymous asked:

Other than Hush, Heart of Hush, and anything not in the Catwoman comics; what is your favorite BatCat scene or story from post 2003 Batman or Detective Comics? And you can include New 52 and Rebirth :)

You knew that I wasn’t going to pick just one moment or story, and since I’m taking it that you meant not something in Catwoman’s solo series that really narrows down.

One of my all time favorite moments is from Detective Comics #800. 

This is what I think about whenever someone says that Catwoman only cares about Batman and not the man underneath the mask. Catwoman, probably more so than anyone else with the exception of Alfred, takes a lot of responsibility for Batman’s humanity. She even gets frustrated when he tries to act like he’s not a person. It shows that she see and accepts him as a whole person and doesn’t compartmentalize Bruce and Batman.  

I love batcat team ups more than anything and one of my personal favorites in from Legends of the Dark Knight #177-178. Catwoman unwittingly teams up with Matches Malone and doesn’t find out until the end that it’s actually Batman. It’s a super fun arc and really funny seeing how simultaneously contentious and teeming with sexual tension the dynamic between Matches Malone and Catwoman is. 

My theory is that this story was about Batman using Matches Malone as excuse to get kinky with Catwoman. Whatever the case may be enjoy it because this is probably the only time you’re going to get to see Batman (as Matches) ask Catwoman for a lap dance. 

Batman/Superman #4. 

There is a world out there where Batman and Catwoman are happily married and are raising a child together and thanks to this panel I’ve had to imagine a whole life for them. We just got a glimpse of what’s that’s like but from what we can tell they’re partners in everything they do and I think it’s really cute that even though they’re married they still flirt with each other. I’m so bitter that Earth 2 BatCat will never get the series that we deserve. 

Injustice Gods Among Us Year One #6. I don’t think this one needs much explanation. 

triforce06  asked:

Do you have any good recommendations for old comics? I would love to get into them but honestly I have no idea where to start.

The Stan Lee/Jack Kirby Fantastic Four was the towering achievement of the 1960s and my favorite comic of all time. Their current shabby treatment by their parent company is inexcusable; Marvel was built by Fantastic Four. FF is my favorite comic ever because it is “hot” and “cold” at the same time, a balancing act that is hard to do in science fiction. It has far out scifi adventures like shrinking to explore a world inside an atom or fighting Galactus the World Devourer, or a villain as melodramatic as Doctor Doom…but we believe in it because of how grounded it is in a real world, with wisecracking, warm characters we like. Every FF story ends in some far out way, but we believe it because of how it starts with something everyday, like the Thing buying hot dogs in Central Park while walking with his girlfriend. It’s like Stan discovered the formula for Coca-Cola; it’s very, very, very hard to tell a bad Fantastic Four story. Sure, FF is great, but it gets ultra-great starting around issue 43, and has an unbroken string of the greatest stories ever for 40 issues: the Coming of Galactus, the introduction of the Black Panther, the introduction of the Inhumans, Doctor Doom stealing the Silver Surfer’s powers (what a shocker that was).

Joe Kubert’s Enemy Ace comic is maybe the best war book ever written, about an honorable German flying ace in World War I. Hans von Hammer had noble and chivalrous instincts: he saluted enemies even after he killed them, and refused to shootan unarmed foe. He once befriended a wolf in the Black Forest, because the both of them were killers, and that wolf was his only real friend. He was the ultimate example of how war shapes even decent men into killers.

Russ Manning’s Magnus Robot Fighter is a crackerjack action-scifi comic that has aged better, not worse since the 1960s, because it’s all about the terror of a society that is overmechanized and under surveillance, where you hate machines but also need them and can’t get rid of them. The fully detailed, realized science fiction world of North Am is what makes it so interesting. Magnus is the Defiant Man in a screwy world; I wonder why John Carpenter never took an interest in making Magnus Robot Fighter as a movie, it would so fit his sensibilities.

If you ask guys who were around for it what they like about Jim Starlin’s Dreadstar, you get the same answer if you asked a wired little kid why they like sugar and caffeine. It was one of the first and best of the “creator owned, adult scifi comics” to come around in the early 1980s, with Vance Dreadstar leading rebels against an Empire. There’s also some bizarre Moorcock inspired mysticism at work. Best of all, Dreadstar is now widely available and reprinted; you owe it to yourself to check it out.

Speaking of adult oriented scifi comics, check out Alan Zelenetz’s Alien Legion. It’s about a futuristic French Foreign Legion made up of convicts, drifters, cutthroats, and criminals from across the known planets. The Legionnaires are expendable and are often sent on suicide missions, political objectives are often at odds with military ones, and a lot of them talk about desertion at times.

Star Brand by Jim Shooter is maybe the only comic that ever did anything interesting with the dead end idea, what would a superhero look like in the real world? It’s a comedy about how we never live up to our potential. When the hero comes back to earth from space, he finds he gets incredibly lost and can’t find his hometown. When he tries to stop a hostage crisis, he realizes that even with powers, he wonders what he could really do that wouldn’t make things worse or escalate the situation. It’s the people that make it worth it: our hero has conflicted feelings about two women, one a single mom, and the other is a girl that loves him, but so much that it doesn’t feel healthy.

Dave Stevens’ Rocketeer is a great retro comic, but the selling point is something that never entirely made it into the film adaptation: it’s all about the sex appeal of good looking girls. I once asked an art teacher of mine what it would take to make a living as an artist, and he told me, “draw good looking girls. If you can, you will never be out of work.” Well, Dave Stevens could, and he’d still be doing it today if not for his tragic passing.

If you’re the kind of person who likes to cry a lot (”sad is happy for deep people”), check out Strikeforce: Morituri, an early 80s comic with a fascinating premise. In order to fight off an alien invasion, a means of giving people superpeople is created, but it has a horrible cost: it gives you only a year to live. It’s all about mortality, nobility, and sacrifice and is really melancholic. Essentially, every single character has a terminal illness. 

Starstruck

or: Four Times Moana and Maui Surprised the Crowd, and One Time They Did Not

My first shot at a 4-and-1 type gig! I tried to keep these short, but you know my writing, that didn’t end up happening. I think this is like seven thousand words total. Look, my hand just slipped for four hours straight. 

Happy, happy birthday to my dear friend @paperjam-bipper! You’re so old now, you shmuck. Congratulations. Hope you enjoy the gratuitous amounts of fluff I stuck in here, just for you. :) 


Fandom: Moana
Words: 7,400
Category: Gen
Relationship: Moana & Maui

Summary: Four times Moana and Maui surprised the crowd, and one time they did not. 


1. 

It’s when the first wave breaks on the deck of their ship that Aronui decides, quite firmly, that she does not like storms.

Even shielded as she is from the worst of the rain by her mother’s sturdy legs and swollen belly, there pellets of water sting against her eyelids, and Aronui has to squint to see the deck of the boat mere feet in front of her. Her hairband was lost long ago to the frenzy of the wind, which whips her hair around her face. When Aronui spares a hand to try and tame it, she ends up nearly ripping off the right half of her head.

“Hard about to port!” shouts a familiar voice, commanding against the fury of the storm.

Aronui looks over to see Moana astride the canoe. Despite the writhing waves that tower around her Moana looks at ease, balanced perfectly atop the edge of her canoe while wrestling with the halyard in both hands. She’s planted at one end of her tiny craft, which sways dangerously in the water, and is somehow using the boat’s instability to clamber up the side and look intently at Kara.

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