fatty in shorts

anonymous asked:

It's somewhat amusing to see you get desperate for someone to like you fatty

This is how you respond to body shaming and negativity. Post a picture in which you would normally feel vulnerable with a smile on your face. : )

2

Haven’t posted any outfit photos in a while. Mostly because I don’t have a full body mirror anymore… and my phone has been majorly malfunctioning. #living in my oversized sweater

kittifizz  asked:

As a fellow curly haired girl and a wen user, what is this curly girl method you speak of?

Hi there, a couple people asked me about this so I hope you don’t mind that I publish this, just to try and consolidate everything I’m trying to recall.

The main idea is to cut out from your routine harsh cleansers that strip your scalp of its natural oils, as well as any ingredients that aren’t water soluble (since you won’t be using the detergents necessary to dissolve them). So essentially that would be sulfates and silicones, respectively. 

[Super late edit, but it seems like some people are interested in this: On the CG method you would also cut out (or reduce your use of) other ingredients that dry your hair, like alcohols. Don’t think that all alcohols are bad, though! There are two kinds of alcohols in conditioners and styling products: short-chain alcohols and fatty alcohols. The short-chain alcohols are what you want to avoid, or limit your use of to products that have them pretty far down on the ingredients list. This includes ethanol, SD alcohol, and alcohol denat. Fatty alcohols, on the other hand, are used as an emollient in haircare products and lots of curly-headed people love to use them because they can make your hair smooth and soft. These include lauryl alcohol, cetyl alcohol and stearyl alcohol.]

That’s probably the most important point, but naturally curly haircare is also concerned with the porosity and thickness of your hair, which affect the kinds of products you should choose, as well as techniques to handle and style curly hair. 

[Another late edit: Porosity refers to how easily moisture passes in and out of your hair, which is affected by how open or closed the cuticle layer is. You can determine the porosity of your hair by doing the “float” test. You pluck a couple hairs and drop them in a glass of water. High porosity hair will sink pretty quickly, low will float, and medium will sink rather slowly. You can also run your fingers along a strand from end to root; high porosity hair feels bumpier because the cuticles are open. You can also simply observe how your hair absorbs water and dries; if it takes a while to soak all the way through in the shower and then takes hours to dry, you likely have lower porosity hair. Read this article for an overview of the kinds of products suit each porosity type.

Climate can also hugely affect curly hair. Curly headed people in areas of extremely high OR low humidity might find that products containing humectants cause their curls to be extremely frizzy. Read this article for an explanation of how to use the weather forecast to help decide whether or no you should use humectants. Keep in mind that while these guidelines are helpful everyone’s hair is different; humectants balanced with the right emollients and styling products can be great for your curls in high humidity. It’s just a matter of trial and error!]

Co-washing, S2C, rake and shake, plopping, pineappling, clipping, etc. are some of the more common phrases dropped when people talk about CG. I know it sounds like weird jargon, but I’ll give you a quick rundown of what the above mean so you get the idea: (some of this info is according to the CG method, and what is not is from my own experience and research; YMMV and all that)

  • Co-washing: cleansing your scalp with conditioner instead of shampoo. You work the conditioner into your scalp as you would with shampoo and massage in circles with your fingertips. The friction is all you need to dislodge dirt and debris, but if you’ve been using shampoos with detergents there is an adjustment period in which you may feel that your hair is oilier than it should be, as your scalp gets used to not having to produce so much oil to make up for the shampoo stripping it away. Some conditioners are better than others for this technique; Lorraine Massey, originator of the CG method, recommends a botanical conditioner. 
  • S2C: this stands for “squish to condish.” It’s basically a technique of conditioning that tries to maximize the amount of water your hair retains, which helps your curls clump together in their natural curl pattern and resist frizz. The technique: in the shower, after detangling, take a generous palmful of conditioner and distribute it through the length of your hair. Go about your other shower stuff, and when you’re ready to rinse, instead of sticking your head under the water, do this… bend over and flip your hair down. Then start introducing a small amount of water into your hair: You can trickle it into the crown if your hair tends to get weighed down, or wet your hands and start scrunching from the ends; most people do it by cupping water in the hands and squishing upward, from end to root. Keep doing this, squishing your curls up with a small amount of water. The idea is to get to the point where your hair is very, very wet but not dripping. (Yes! Swear to God, this is possible!) If your hair is quite dehydrated you can add a bit more conditioner and repeat, or just give it a couple weeks and you’ll notice the difference. The texture you’re looking for is kind of like slippery wet seaweed. Again, not all conditioners are suited for this. Keep in mind that you’re not totally rinsing out the product. Conditioners with guar gum, for example, have a tendency to feel sticky/gummy in your hair if you don’t rinse completely. 
  • Rake and shake: This is a method of applying styling products by raking them through your hair from root to end, then gently shaking your hair while holding at the end in order to restore your natural curl pattern. I don’t use this myself, as I prefer to scrunch in my products. (By the way, you should use products while your hair is still quite wet, although if you’ve got a big thick mop like me you can give it a quick squeeze dry first)
  • Plopping: This is a method of drying your hair after you’ve showered and applied your styling products. Terry cloth towels do not ever touch my curls; I use a thin, smooth cotton towel kind of like a flour sack towel, and many people just use cotton t-shirts. Terry cloth towels are bad for curls because they’re too absorbent, drying parts of your hair—especially the top—too quickly, creating mega frizz. Plopping involves using a cotton scarf or t-shirt to wrap up your hair such that it’s just “plopped” on top of your head. No twisting! That ruins your natural curl pattern. Morning showerers can do this for however long they have to spare in the morning; I shower in the evening and plop overnight.
  • Pineappling: This is a trick to sleeping with dry hair. Bend over and flip your hair down, and use a scrunchie to gather it in a loose ponytail on top of your head. Flip all that hair up and over your pillow as you sleep; most people find that pineappling avoids getting their curls frizzy and tangled overnight. If they need a little refreshing in the morning you can use a spray bottle of water to spritz all over and perk up your curls.
  • Clipping: This involves using alligator clips at the base of your curls, an inch or so from the root, as they dry. The idea is that it creates a bit of lift there when you remove the clips, giving you more volume at the roots. I don’t do this because I have plenty volume as it is :P

/r/curlyhair is a really good resource for info/advice about the CG method and natural haircare in general. If you want to read more about CG in particular, you can look up the Curly Girl Handbook by Lorraine Massey, who is the originator of this method and a curly girl herself!

As I mentioned, everyone should choose their products according to their own hair type and what works for them. Everyone’s hair is different! But for reference, here are my holy grail products (for my very thick, medium porosity hair that’s very well hydrated after many years on CG):

Trader Joe’s Tea Tree Tingle for co-wash

Aubrey Organics White Camellia conditioner and Mill Creek Botanicals Aloe Vera conditioner for S2C

Shea Moisture Raw Shea Restorative Conditioner as a leave-in 

Shea Moisture Curl Enhancing Smoothie for bounciness and shininess

Eco Styler Olive Oil Gel for hold

I know this method is not for everyone. I can only share what’s worked for me, in the hope that it will be helpful for someone else. This is my very happy hair after years of the Curly Girl method:

Take cold-weather inspiration from Antarctica’s iconic emperor penguins!

Some animal species are impeccably prepared to cope with freezing conditions. Emperor penguins can tolerate temperatures as low as 40 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. They keep warm thanks to an inch-thick layer of fatty insulation and short, spear-shaped feathers—up to 100 of them per square inch of skin, enough to make these the mostly densely feathered birds on the planet.

These famously flightless birds are also accomplished divers, hunting fish, squid, and other marine fare more than 1,700 feet below the surface of the ocean. These hunting trips necessitate another set of adaptations for the penguin, which boasts solid bones that are resistant to trauma brought on by changing pressures during deep dives, rather than the hollow bones that are more common in birds.

Emperor penguins can also shut down some of their organs during a dive, redirecting energy and oxygen to support only the most essential functions. Combine these traits, and you’ve got an amazing animal that can swim for nearly 20 minutes at a time in freezing water—and bring back a meal for its chick to boot.

Pictured are models from the traveling exhibition, Race to the End of the Earth.

Some animal species are impeccably prepared to cope with freezing conditions. Antarctica’s iconic emperor penguins can tolerate temperatures as low as 40 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. They keep warm thanks to an inch-thick layer of fatty insulation and short, spear-shaped feathers—up to 100 of them per square inch of skin, enough to make these the mostly densely feathered birds on the planet.

These famously flightless birds are also accomplished divers, hunting fish, squid, and other marine fare more than 1,700 feet below the surface of the ocean. These hunting trips necessitate another set of adaptations for the penguin, which boasts solid bones that are resistant to trauma brought on by changing pressures during deep dives, rather than the hollow bones that are more common in birds.

Emperor penguins can also shut down some of their organs during a dive, redirecting energy and oxygen to support only the most essential functions. Combine these traits, and you’ve got an amazing animal that can swim for nearly 20 minutes at a time in freezing water—and bring back a meal for its chick to boot.

Find out about more amazing species thriving in exceptional environments in the special exhibition Life at the Limits, open now through January 3, 2016.

Image: Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons