fathers-and-children

anonymous asked:

Yea, but what about Bramble, Hawk, Moth, Tawny and Tadpole? :00 I don't know shit about genetics, and since in your purebreed HCs sometimes mother/Father and children don't have similar breeds, I wondered if it would be the same with the Tiger family... Sorry o,u,o

i mean…i posted the parents breeds…u can do the math from there like ?

bramble & tawny are norwegian forest x maine coon

hawk, moth and tadpole are maine coon x thai 

5

Remembering Robert Godwin Sr., victim of Facebook live shooting

  • As the manhunt continues for Steve Stephens, the family of the victim, 74-year-old Robert Godwin Sr., have taken to social media to honor the life of a beloved relative they say was “a good man” through and through.
  • Below are some of the details of Godwin’s life, as described by those who loved him.
  • “He’d give you the shirt off his back,” one of Godwin’s family members said during a tearful interview with CNN affiliate WOIO
  • “This man right here was a good man. I hate he’s gone. I don’t know what I’m going to do. … It’s not real.”
  • Family mattered most to him. In an interview with Cleveland.com, Godwin’s son, Robert Godwin Jr., said that his father is survived by nine children, 14 grandchildren and many great grandchildren.
  • He loved to fish and clean up litter. Godwin Jr. said that his father had gone fishing the Saturday before he was killed, a hobby he particularly enjoyed in his retirement. 
  • He also said that Godwin Sr. often patrolled the streets with a plastic shopping bag, picking up the aluminum cans he saw on the ground along the way. Read more (4/17/17 1 PM)
  • what i expected going into see Logan: a bloody gory action packed Wolverine film with zero chill and maximum violence
  • what i got: a father/ son father/daughter roadtrip flick through children of men stylescape of dystopian heartbreak that deals with issues of human trafficking and the exploitation of women of color's bodies and genetic engineering ethics that made me cry multiple times
2

Harry and the little sleeping boy. 💛 

“We’re gonna sing, very quietly, You & I.”

latimes.com
'I know they are going to die.' This foster father takes in only terminally ill children
The children were going to die.
By Hailey Branson-Potts

Mohamed Bzeek knew that. But in his more than two decades as a foster father, he took them in anyway — the sickest of the sick in Los Angeles County’s sprawling foster care system.

He has buried about 10 children. Some died in his arms.

Now, Bzeek spends long days and sleepless nights caring for a bedridden 6-year-old foster girl with a rare brain defect. She’s blind and deaf. She has daily seizures. Her arms and legs are paralyzed.

Bzeek, a quiet, devout Libyan-born Muslim who lives in Azusa, just wants her to know she’s not alone in this life. “I know she can’t hear, can’t see, but I always talk to her,” he said. “I’m always holding her, playing with her, touching her. … She has feelings. She has a soul. She’s a human being.”

Read the whole story at the link.

You’re the lover of a Queen who use to rule over the kingdom with kindness. You were the kid she use to practice sword fighting with, and she was the young princess who slipped you money for your family to eat and taught you how to read. As you grew up together, you were excited for the prospect of being the Queen’s protector, lover and father to her children. The power has driven her mad though, she’s cruel and sadistic, and her only pleasure is to torture those who serve her. A servant who owes you her life informs you of the your lover’s plans for your assassination. You have a choice; kill your lover and take over the kingdom for yourself, or let her continue to rule and escape to live your life on the run.

8

I put everything I had into it - all my feelings and everything I’d learned in 46 years of living, about family life and fathers and children. And my feelings about racial justice and inequality and opportunity. [Gregory Peck on his Oscar-winning role in To Kill a Mockingbird]

To Kill A Mockingbird (1962) Dir. Robert Mulligan

i cant get over the fact that a man who lived 78 fucking years, fathered 9 children, grandfathered 14, just comes to an end like that.

its been hours since mistakingly watching the raw video and its just replaying over and over.

steve stephens, wherever the hell you are, i hope you experience the most excruciating and painful death possible. you are the embodiment of living shit.

Berserk and Amon

Since :Re began (and even earlier, really), it feels like Ishida is making intentional references to the manga “Berserk” within Amon’s story arc. The most obvious evidence of all actually begins with Seidou… 

Now, this gross meat pile isn’t only a meat pile. It looks really similar to the Behelit from Berserk.

Though Ishida could’ve simply been going for a horror element here, the meat that Amon was originally given to eat had no faces. It was just a pile of human meat that was successfully presented as horrifying without further visual impact. Furthermore, the Crimson Behelit offers the chance for one of Berserk’s main characters to leave his humanity behind in exchange for his flesh, blood, and family…and Seidou changed after consuming the meat he was given (implied to be the meat of his family members). The Behelit is active when its eyes are open, too, so it seems like this reference was probably intentional. 

Of course, just one reference isn’t enough to build a theory off of. Fortunately, there are more! The gross meat pile makes its return in the latest chapter…

Though it no longer has the characteristic egg-shape. It is however, something that haunts Amon. It also looks like something that haunts Guts, a character with a lot of eery similarities to Amon.

The disgusting demon baby that follows Guts and Caska around is representative of his trauma, his guilt, and his fears. It isn’t harmful by itself and, at times, is actually helpful. This is well in-line with what human meat represents to Amon.

The demon baby is eventually consumed by a Behelit and is used to “change the world”, as per the wish of an (explicitly reference to be) empty man. Considering the context this image was brought up in, and keeping in mind Amon’s desire to change the world, it seems that this reference is intentional. 

Still, more evidence is required before people can really start drawing parallels between Guts’ arc in Berserk and Amon’s in Tokyo Ghoul. Luckily for me, people have been speculating about their similarities for quite some time and so panels are easy to find. 

1. 
Both characters wield a frankly ridiculously huge weapon that they inherited from a friend. The weapon requires a massive amount of strength to use and is unique to them. 

2. 
They both lost an arm. 

3. 
The Arata armour looks almost exactly like Guts’ armour. Both sets of armour are taxing for their user to operate, but were necessary to fight enemies much stronger than themselves.

4. 
They both wind up having the aesthetic of a “Dark Knight”. As a “knight”, they wind up saving young girls who later return the favour and help bring them down from a monstrous take-over by their armour without killing them. 

(Amon rescues Saiko in full armour, ffs)

5.
Suffered a massive betrayal at the hands of a father figure. Killed many people for said father-figure (as children!!!!) and developed an obsession with perpetuating this cycle. Also: both orphans.

6. 
A cross to bear ie. Amon’s cross and Guts’ mark (both on their necks, both meant to never let them escape from their past, both with massive religious connotations) 

7. 
Their whole look. The entire thing. Half-ghoul Amon looks so much like Guts.

There’s also the “near constant state of hatred towards a world they perceive as wrong” thing and the “fail to learn from their mistakes” thing and the “is basically no longer human” thing alongside the “awkward beautiful man who doesn’t know how to deal with women” thing. 

TLDR: Guts and Amon share a lot of characteristics and this latest chapter brought it up again so I couldn’t help but make a compilation post. 

Why We Need Stories about Dark Things

One of the things I get tired of from time to time is the perspective that if something shows evil behavior then that means the story, song, game, whatever, is inherently bad. But there is a difference between illustrating evil behavior and promoting it.

Not all appearances of bad behavior invite bad behavior.

While one purpose of storytelling is to entertain, another purpose is to teach or educate–a purpose that in today’s world, most people seem to have forgotten.

A long time ago, there used to be all sorts of horrific stories told. Open Grimms’ fairy tales, and you’ll see that Cinderella really isn’t that Disney-friendly. But often some of those older stories were meant to teach a lesson or scare children into behaving (that latter point is one I personally don’t condone). Horrific things happen in the Bible (and the Book of Mormon). We can often learn from these accounts, but some of them are simply a record of what happened (if you believe in that), whether you like the content or not. It is what it is. Conspiring incest, rape, slaughter, and even cannibalism can be found in scripture stories. In today’s world, most people have been conditioned to believe that stories are only meant to entertain. Or entertain and uplift.

Those two things are valid. But what I get tired of, though, is the perspective that all stories should be full of puppies and rainbows (yeah, that’s an exaggeration, but you know what I mean), and that’s what we should be writing, and if a story is dark, it’s “bad” or lesser or … something.

The World Needs Stories about Dark Things

It’s important we write about what I call “the big and heavies”–rape, addiction, suicide, massacre, societal brainwashing, etc. And when I say “we,” I don’t mean specifically that you or I HAVE to; I mean “we” as in us, writers and creatives everywhere. The world needs creatives who delve into the big and heavies, and here’s why:

1. Stories provide a safe means to explore and discuss dark things

The big and heavies are vital to discuss for a healthy society. We shouldn’t be turning a blind eye to dark deeds. We should be turning the right eye to them. Literature offers a safe way to explore and discuss these issues. It offers some distance (because it’s usually a work of fiction) while simultaneously having the ability to offer closeness–empathy.

Also, fiction provides a type of lens to view these behaviors through. Speculative fiction might have a more exaggerated or symbolic lens, such as the fashion industry of Panem in The Hunger Games, or the discussion of pure bloods in Harry Potter. A lens lets us view the issues in a way that may emphasize certain points or give us a new perspective on them, and again, the distance can provide a bit of a “safe” buffer for readers. We aren’t talking about racism; we’re talking about magical blood–and we can have a whole discussion on it that correlates with issues seen in racism, and no one needs to feel uncomfortable because this is about wizarding blood. Even realistic fiction provides a perspective, though less exaggerated, to see these issues through.

2. Powerful, emotional ramification drives home a point or idea or lesson.

Unlike reading text books or the news, fiction writing often works off making the audience feel something. It appeals to emotional experience, even more than intellectual experience. It is one of the only mediums where we can put on the skin and thoughts of another person.

In parts of society, we try hard to divorce intellect and emotion, but powerful emotional experiences are often what cement ideas and lessons into our minds. Back in the day, fathers used to take their children out to their property line and beat them so that the child would never forget where the property line was. We’ve seen similar conditioning with training wild animals. Both are crude examples, of course, but the emotional experience drove home the lesson. While negative emotions are powerful, this same thing can happen with strong positive emotions. We remember powerful feelings of happiness and of love, and if there are any lessons or insights associated with those, we recall those too.

In fiction, emotional experiences can drive home powerful lessons. And they stick with the audience.

Strong emotional experiences in fiction amplify the conceptual ramifications of dark deeds, and cements into the reader the weight of such behavior, in a way that pure intellect cannot. Once we “experience” an issue, we care more about it. Fiction is a vehicle that allows us to develop and fine-tune our empathetic skills, so we can better understand and relate to those who’ve dealt with such issues.

3. Explore, cognitively, the causes, consequences, and facets of the big and heavies

In the real world, we live our own lives in our own perspectives, and that’s it. In literature, you can include several perspectives of those involved with an issue. You can often see the issue’s causes, consequences, and facets to a degree you may not in your own life. You can see far-reaching effects in a matter of hundreds of pages, rather than decades or hundreds of years. This opens up new ideas, new perspectives on the topic, which leads to more discussion.

4. To provide hope and uplift, in spite of darkness. To overcome.

I sometimes see this weird idea that an uplifting story needs to not cross some invisible line too far into the dark. In some ways, that couldn’t be further from the truth. As a Harry Potter fan, I’ve had friends come up to me and talk about how they’re disappointed that the stories got darker and darker. Maybe I’m weird (okay, there’s no “maybe” about it), but I like that. I like stories getting dark. I like when they get darker and darker. I like my evil, evil. I want the Voldemort who tries to possess Harry to get Dumbledore to kill him. I want the Voldemort who tortured animals as a small child and who murdered others to split his soul into seven pieces. The world is often an evil place. And how much more powerful is it to overcome the bowels of the most wicked, than it is to overcome a guy who shoplifted? I like my evil, evil. Not because I want to be part of the dark, but because I like seeing people overcome it.

A story that includes dark materials can be just as uplifting, if not more uplifting (because of the contrast) than a story that doesn’t. The idea that a story can’t be dark and inspiring is just unfounded.

Every Christmas season, I become a fan of The Trans-Siberian Orchestra all over again. If you’ve never heard of them, you may still recognize some of their most iconic Christmas songs, some of which have gone viral on synchronized Christmas light videos.

What many people might not realize is that each of their Christmas albums actual tells, and comes with, a written story. If you see the Trans-Siberian Orchestra live, they will read the story to you bits at a time, interspersed with music. But not all their stories are about happy sleigh rides, warm fires, Christmas hams, and decorated trees. There are parents who abandoned their disabled children, babies born addicted to crack, love that has been lost. But the stories and albums are uplifting, not because the creators avoided dark subject matter, but because they illustrated the power of overcoming–overcoming difficult times and personal mistakes. It’s hard to make it through one of their performances with a dry eye through the whole thing.

5. To render reality–others’ reality or your own

But some stories aren’t necessarily meant to be about overcoming the dark or inspiring an audience. Some stories are just about reality. Human nature. The natural man. Experiences that people actually go through. Some stories are simply meant to render, often for reasons 1-3. It’s a statement. It’s meant to create social awareness, empathy. Maybe it’s meant to start a discussion. Those stories need to exist too.

Closing Thoughts

Keep in mind that many audiences only see stories strictly as mediums for entertainment and, on a subconscious level, a reinforcement of a positive, maybe even sugary, feelings and ideas. Those audiences may (on a subconscious level) refuse anything that is otherwise, and consider any mention of the dark and heavies as something that shouldn’t be there. That is their right.

And in some cases, they are correct. Some stories do not need and should not have dark content. It doesn’t serve the purpose of the story, it messes up the tone of the story, and it can ruin what was already working. You wouldn’t, for example, put in a serious plot line in The Office about Pam being legitimately raped. It doesn’t fit.

And with all that said, you shouldn’t feel forced to write content you feel very uncomfortable writing. Your work should reflect the writerly you.

Next week, I’ll talk about how to write about dark things without promoting them.

Rest in peace, Rosey
[April 7th, 1970 - April 17th, 2017]

Reports have surfaced that former WWE World Tag Team Champion Rosey, real name Matt Anoai, has passed away. He was 47.

Rosey competed for the WWE from 2001 until 2006, starting in developmental as one half of The Island Boys with his partner who would later be known as Jamal (who would even later be known as Umaga). The two debuted in the WWE as 3 Minute Warning, monstrous henchman for Eric Bischoff who would tire of segments and send in Rosey and Jamal to bring them to a violent abrupt ending.

When Jamal was released from the WWE, Rosey began teaming with The Hurricane in a comical but successful duo, where he morphed from being a Super Hero In Training (note the acronym) to being The Hurricane’s super sidekick! The two captured the WWE World Tag Team Championships at Backlash in 2005.

Outside the ring, Rosey was well-liked by his peers and has been mourned greatly by superstars from the WWE and in the greater Cincinnati area, where he teamed with Jamal in HWA. Rosey was the son of WWE Hall Of Famer Sika, the brother of WWE superstar Roman Reigns, and was the father of three children as well as the owner of a restaurant in Mason, Ohio. I had the pleasure of meeting Rosey several times, the most memorable of which being in 2005 shortly after he and The Hurricane won the tag titles. I recall telling him that I’d marked out for the occasion, to which Rosey said, “So did I!”

Rest in peace, Matt Anoai. You were beloved by so many, and I’m sure you’ll never be forgotten.

*** how to help do5 kids***

UPDATE: all of do5′s videos have been taken down.

i’m making this post because i understand that watching the videos themselves is triggering, so i will do it for you.

  1. click on the link
  2. click the three dots under the video
  3. click the flag icon that says “report”
  4. select “child abuse”
  5. for timestamp, input the time i place after the link.
  6. for the description, you can input your own message or include mine in the parenthesis.
  7. have adblocker up.

if we can get youtube to take down ONE MORE VIDEO, he will lose the channel. ok? please report. here we go

Dad goes on a RAMPAGE @ 5:21 (father egging children to tackle younger child; they pick him up and slam him on the floor as dad films.)

Kids get the BELT!  @ 19:36 (brothers beating up emma, trying to choke her out, then hits her with a belt)

KID GOES DOWN THE STEPS HEAD FIRST  @ 31:11 (father threatening to kick child in the face)

Cody gets BULLIED @ 3:06 (exactly as the title says, the two older brothers just torment and bully cody and occasionally hit him)

DAD AND CODY MAKE A VOLCANO!!   @ 15:43 (father hits cody’s arm for no apparent reason; arm has visible bruises)

please please please report these videos and DON’T just reblog some fucking ms paint star and pray, jfc

if you have the “spoons” or fortitude or whatever, please also report mommyofive’s channel which is the stepmother. i will make another post for mommyofive’s channel if anyone requests.