father greg

Comparison of Steven’s and Nora’s Tapes

For Steven:

Isn’t it remarkable, Steven?
This world is full of so many possibilities.
Each living thing has an entirely unique experience.
The sights they see, the sounds they hear, the lives they live, are so complicated and so simple.
I can’t wait for you to join them.

Steven, we can’t both exist.
I’m going to become half of you.
And I need you to know that every moment you love being yourself, that’s me loving you and loving being you.
Because you’re going to be something extraordinary, you’re going to be a human being.

Take care of them, Steven.

For Nora:

Isn’t it wonderful, Nora?
This world is full of so many possibilities.
Each living thing has an entirely unique experience.
The sights they see, and the lives they live, are so complicated and so simple.
I can’t wait for you to join them.

Nora, we can’t both exist but i won’t be gone.
I’m going to become half of you.
And every moment you enjoy yourself, that will be me loving being you.
Because you’re going to become something extraordinary, you’re going to be a human being.
And that’s my favourite part, a human being.
A human being, a human is an action.
i wonder who— how you’ll be, what you’ll think, what you’ll want…
I’m so happy for everybody who’s going to know you.
I’m rambling.
if they look to you, trust yourself.

Take care of them, Nora.


From what we can see, comparing the two videos, Steven’s was shot first. Not only are Greg and Rose more unsure about what they’re going to say and do, they’re also figuring out what should go into the video in the first place.

The first few scenes, which show Greg’s sleeping, messing around, and meeting the seagull for the first time, as well as Rose’s not knowing what the buttons do and experimenting with them, reveal that whatever practice they did going into the video shoot ultimately didn’t prepare them for it fully.

At the same time, when comparing what’s being said between Steven’s and Nora’s tapes, they have the same substance; the same message is being delivered: Rose hoped her child would get to live life to the fullest and make experiences that were fun and happy. She wanted to assure her child that she cared, even though she wouldn’t be there. Most of all, she wanted to assure them that being human was a great thing. 

The thing is, Steven’s message is much more brief, and a little more formal. Rose clearly practiced what she wanted to say, and in the first tape, she went for it, likely because of nerves.

By the second filming, she seemed more comfortable in front of the camera and that’s also why she could clear up her nerves and keep expounding on her ideas.

So Steven, who read very deeply into the words of his mother, may have picked up on her saying he would be extraordinary and a human being. And he fixated on becoming someone worth calling extraordinary, when in fact, Rose had always meant to say by virtue of living, one could be extraordinary. 

And we can’t really blame him, because he went from being another Beach City kid to being at the centre of an intergalactic conflict. It’s hard to accept that these things would happen to him if he weren’t destined for something.

I’d go as far as to say that hoping he was part of some magical destiny gave him strength at times, despite how bleak the situation could be.

The thing with this line of thinking though, is how much it wears on someone. The responsibility of being accountable for all these people and all these systems that were quite obviously out of his control and consequently responsibility in the first place was heavy on him.

Steven does want to be a hero. He does want to help people. But he felt more comfortable with this being his choice and his decision, not some destiny thrust upon him, not a tradeoff between his life and the many others he’d have to save.

I think Greg’s talk with him helped him process those feelings, which he’d been keeping inside for a while now. Steven thought everyone expected him to be like Rose, and that may have been true at some points in the show, but his father never did. And that’s what made Greg’s words so reassuring, because his sincerity could be felt in all of them.

On Greg's Age

After the Character Analysis post on Holly Blue, I just wanted to bring up something about age and SU characters.

From Adventures in Light Distortion:

Greg + 70 years = 110th birthday
Greg is 40 now
Steven is 14 years old
40-14= 26
Greg had Steven at 26

Given this information, the interactions between young Greg and Rose and also young Greg and baby Steven are clearer now.

It’s not to say that age is a determinant of maturity. But in most societies, certain ages are accompanied by life milestones. People are ushered into a new social environment at the dawn of certain years in their lives. We mark these years and generally we are able to pinpoint the kind of experiences someone has had by the time these years roll around.

Like how Greg was about done with college when he decided to drop out and be a rockstar.

Or how Rose may have been his very first serious relationship. And how he was Rose’s. 

And how Greg is still really young and is at the age most people are starting to reap the benefits of their work. Greg finally getting his royalty checks is doing just that.

But mostly how Greg gave up the years he was most hireable to raise Steven in a way that entered his son would always get to make his own choices in life, as he did.

In Honor of Father’s day

Greg Universe and Yellowtail are my favorite SU dads. Here’s why:

-Supportive and Super Cool™!

-Sings! (I love his voice!) And plays guitar! And he encourages his son to love music!

-Audio Daddio

-Did I mention supportive?!

-Doesn’t pressure him to be Masculine™ in the least!

-Looks good in a suit

-”That’s what was so exciting to your mom, that life is full of so many possibilities, and you would get to explore them for yourself. I mean, you could be Steven or Nora or anyone else. And you can always change your name. Hey, I did.”

-Loves and supports his son, even with stuff he doesn’t understand (i.e. Steven’s gem training)

-Respects Steven’s friendship with Connie and doesn’t insinuate that she’s his girlfriend or anything!

-Loves and supports both his biological and his step son

-Super cool and caring!

-Super cute! Fluffy and yellow! Look at his little blue rain boots!

-The Beard™

-Super busy with work but always makes time for stuff like this^

-Hates Marty for what he did to SC (Don’t we all?)

-Agreed to name his child Onion (’cause Sour Cream and Onion, amiright?!)

-Poses for his wife’s portraits b/c he loves her

-Cutest fisherman in existence, I don’t make the rules


Honorable mention: Doug Maheswaran

-Dad Jokes™

-”And how’s my swashbuckling swashbuckler doing?”

-Tries his best

-Cool jacket

-Keeps the riffraff in check with his trusty flashlight

-(Left a young child alone at night by a closed amusement park instead of offering him a ride home, causing him to be fucking abducted by aliens)

anonymous asked:

y'know i never really understood the justification for greg having to live separately from steven and the gems. nothing in the show necessitates their current living arrangement other than the gems being salty about rose. it seems really unfair to the guy since according to lore he's paying for the house and all the bills but he himself is content living out of a van. and he's such a good dad to steven, clearly they love each other and have a good relationship. just doens't make sense

Greg: *BUILDS THE HOUSE*
Greg: *pays for the house at the temple and everything in it*
Greg: *is a loving and supportive father to Steven*
Greg: So, now that I’ve built the house and we’re all set up, I can’t wait for us to create a new family for Steven together! 
The Gems: Actually…….. You’re not allowed, you have to live in the van. Also? We’ve kidnapped your baby and endangered him multiple times, so as you can see, we’re the responsible ones here. 

Initial Thoughts: Doug Out

I’m rather glad that what I’d predicted for Doug Out came to be. You can tell very early on in the episode that Mr. Maheswaran isn’t used to “exciting” things happening in his job.

At least twice he was caught off guard as strange things happened around him. And it’s a perfectly understandable reaction. Even Steven had to adjust to the things going on around him.

But what he says at the end, about wanting to be taken seriously and wanting to be more than just the goof in Connie’s life really puts his actions into context.

The foreshadowing with the clown nose was especially telling.

But little things before that, such as when he asked Steven and Connie if they wanted to join the stakeout. In hindsight, all of it appeared very planned.

Even his driving up to the two now seems like a deliberate attempt instead of a chance encounter. I mean, he probably wasn’t expecting a job in Beach City, but once he knew he’d be assigned there, he probably started formulating a way to spend time with his daughter.

But I really enjoyed the way his talking about his feelings wasn’t contrived. It felt very organic that he was vocally disappointed that something “cooler” didn’t come up (at the very least a teen using some strong language). And this prompted Connie to ask him what was really wrong.

And I liked how Doug didn’t make a big show out of feeling like he wasn’t cool enough for his daughter. He wasn’t blaming her for whatever feelings he thought she might have for Dr. Maheswaran. He wasn’t asking her to choose him.

I feel the episodes with Connie’s parents always stand in stark contrast to the episodes that focus on the relationships between Steven and the Gems or Steven and Greg, or Greg and the Gems, where often, Steven must act as mediator (Mr. Greg and Keystone Motel come to mind).

It’s a far cry from Fusion Cuisine, when it appeared as though Steven’s family was more together and open than the Maheswarans.

Of course, Greg and the gems are doing a lot of things right. I think it does serve to highlight though how differently these two groups handle the youth.

He was just expressing his feelings. By the way he pushed the marbles around with his feet and looked down, it’s likely something that made him feel uncomfortable.

I liked how he framed the situation as his not having an exciting career, and how he wanted to give Connie the experience of having a cool dad. He didn’t frame it in a way that pushed responsibility on Connie, and he gave her the space to respond in a huge number of ways.

And I really liked how from the beginning, Connie’s response wasn’t contrived either. Even before he finishes speaking, Connie already has an answer. She didn’t have to think up a way of explaining away what her father felt was his inadequacy. She wasn’t going to deny that he wasn’t the same as her mother.

Connie embraces her father for whom he is. And I think in light of his becoming more supportive of the life she’s leading, it’s a lovely way to develop their characters. 

Initial Thoughts: Lion 4

This moment is so artfully rendered. The build-up to this scene was the boiling over of Steven’s feeling Rose’s presence and pressure in his life. 

And then as Greg reassures him of Rose’s desire (that all the best parents deep down want for their children) for Steven to find himself, embrace it, and be happy, Rose is there, watching from behind them.

It’s very much like the scenes we usually get in the temple, when Rose’s portrait hangs over everyone. But over there her eyes are closed and she’s frozen in a picture-perfect moment. 

This scene dispels the lasting tension brought about by that version of Rose, the individual who was perfect and could do no wrong, the gem who must have had a motive for having Steven.

The Rose behind Steven and Greg had fully accepted her role as mother. She giggled, rambled, and admitted to her imperfections and inadequacies. She hints at the regret of not being able to really meet her son.

Her eyes are wide open in the paused video. It’s as if she herself became more aware and at the same time more open about herself. The resolution is blurry, because we can never really get the entire image of someone else, not even in video. It’s not the clean pastel colours that we see in her portrait.

Leading up to his, Steven did feel alone. He felt he was carrying the weight of his destiny by himself. This scene beautifully shows that both his parents are there to support him. Rose may have left behind a repository of “junk,” both the literal and metaphorical, but Steven wasn’t entirely wrong.

Rose was indeed leaving things behind for him. But they weren’t necessarily leading to a big revelation of his destiny. Each time we encountered something Rose meant for Steven to find, it was only a tool and not a determinant towards what Steven would do next. 

And in this episode, we recall those places all over again, reinforcing this theme. The armoury, the fountain, the room. Even Lion.

All these things Rose left behind were left without instruction. That’s why Steven became confused and certain it was a cryptic message left for him. In reality, it was because she never wanted anything of her son. She wanted to share so much of her life and her history but she knew she wouldn’t be there to do it.

It was precisely because Rose didn’t want him to feel the pressure to take up her mantle that she left things largely unexplained.

There were definitely flaws to her approach, but her intentions, seen very clearly in her two videos, stayed true throughout her journey to becoming Steven’s mother.

From day one, that neither knew who Steven would be is a reflection of what every parent feels when having a child. 

What I feel this episode really cements is Steven’s decision-making as an individual. The significance of his life’s choices rests on him. And I hope these are themes we get to explore more in the rest of the Steven Bomb and in the show.