fatal poisoning

Common Toxic Herbs and their Effects

This is not a complete list by any means, but these commonly noted plants, herbs, and flowers should be handled with care or avoided altogether. 

Aconite (Wolfsbane, Monkshood) - all parts: dermatoxic, hepatotoxic, and neurotoxic

Adam and Eve (Jack-in-the-Pulpit, Wild Arum) - root: dermatoxic and gastrotoxic if ingested

African Sumac - leaves: dermatoxic; possibly fatal

Agave - juice: dermatoxic  

Angel’s Trumpet - all parts: cardiotoxic; often fatal

Apple - seeds: cytotoxic in large doses

Apricot - leaves and seeds: cytotoxic in large doses

Arnica - gastrotoxic 

Asparagus - berries: dermatoxic and gastrotoxic if ingested

Azalea - all parts: cytotoxic and neurotoxic; rarely fatal

Betel Nut Palm (Pinyang) - all parts: gastrotoxic if ingested

Bittersweet Nightshade - all parts: neurotoxic and gastrotoxic; rarely fatal

Black Hellebore - all parts: cardiotoxic and gastrotoxic; possibly fatal

Black Locust (False Acacia) - root bark and flowers: gastrotoxic

Black Nightshade - all parts except ripe fruit: neurotoxic and gastrotoxic; possibly fatal

Bleeding Heart - leaves and roots: neurotoxic

Bloodroot - rhizomes: cytotoxic

Blue Passion Flower (Common Passion Flower) - leaves: cytotoxic

Bracken - all parts: carcinogenic

Buttercup - all parts: gastrotoxic and dermatoxic 

Calabar Bean (Ordeal Beans) - seeds: neurotoxic and gastrotoxic if ingested in large doses

Cassava - leaves and roots: cytotoxic in large doses

Castor Bean (Castor Oil Plant) - seeds: cytotoxic if ingested or inhaled

Celandine - nephrotoxic 

Cherry - leaves and seeds: cytotoxic in large doses

Christmas Rose - all parts: gastrotoxic

Cocklebur - seedlings and seeds: gastrotoxic and neurotoxic

Columbine - seeds and roots: cardiotoxic; easily fatal

Corn Lily (False Hellebore) - all parts: cardiotoxic; often fatal

Cowbane (Water Hemlock, Snakeweed) - root: neurotoxic if ingested

Daffodil - bulbs and stems: gastrotoxic; possibly fatal

Datura/Moonflower - all parts: gastrotoxic and cardiotoxic

Deadly Nightshade (Belladonna) - all parts: cardiotoxic and neurotoxic; often fatal

Desert Rose (Sabi Star, Kudu) - sap: cardiotoxic with skin contact

Dumbcane - all parts: dermatoxic; possibly fatal

Elder (Elderberry) - root: gastrotoxic

Elephant Ear (Angel Wings) - all parts: dermatoxic and gastrotoxic

Ergot - neurotoxic 

Foxglove - leaves, seeds, and flowers: cardiotoxic; often fatal

Garlic - all parts: gastrotoxic in animals

Giant Hogweed - all parts: dermatoxic

Golden Chain - all parts, especially seeds: neurotoxic and gastrotoxic; possibly fatal

Goldenseal - all parts: gastrotoxic and neurotoxic in large doses

Grapes/Raisins - all parts: gastrotoxic in dogs

Greater Celandine - all parts: gastrotoxic in large doses

Hemlock (Spotted Cowbane, Poison Snakeweed) - all parts: neurotoxic; possibly fatal

Hemlock Water Dropwort - roots: neurotoxic if ingested; possibly fatal

Henbane - all parts: neurotoxic and cardiotoxic

Holly - berries: gastrotoxic

Honeybush - all parts: gastrotoxic

Honeysuckle - berries: gastrotoxic in mild cases and cardiotoxic in severe cases

Horse Chestnut - all parts: neurotoxic

Hyacinth - bulbs: gastrotoxic and neurotoxic; possibly fatal

Iris - rhizomes: gastrotoxic and dermatoxic 

Jequirity (Crab’s Eye, Rosary Pea) - seeds: neurotoxic and gastrotoxic; often fatal

Kava Kava - nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic 

Kidney Bean - raw: gastrotoxic

Larkspur - young plants and seeds: neurotoxic; often fatal

Lemon - oil: dermatoxic and gastrotoxic to animals  

Lily - all parts: nephrotoxic

Lily of the Nile (Calla Lily) - all parts: dermatoxic and gastrotoxic if ingested; possibly fatal

Lily of the Valley - all parts: cardiotoxic; possibly fatal

Lima Beans - raw: gastrotoxic

Lime - oil: dermatoxic and gastrotoxic in animals

Lobelia - all parts: gastrotoxic 

Mandrake - roots and leaves: gastrotoxic and neurotoxic

Mango - peel and sap: dermatoxic

Mangrove - bark and sap: dermatoxic and eye irritation

Mayapple - all green parts and unripe fruit: gastrotoxic

Meadow Saffron (Autumn Crocus) - bulbs: gastrotoxic; possibly fatal

Mistletoe - leaves and berries: gastrotoxic, cardiotoxic, and neurotoxic; rarely lethal in adults

Moonseed - fruits and seeds: gastrotoxic; often fatal

Mountain Laurel - all green parts: gastrotoxic

Nutmeg - raw: psychoactive in large doses

Oak - leaves and acorns: gastrotoxic; rarely fatal

Odollam Tree (Suicide Tree) - seeds: cardiotoxic; often fatal

Oleander - all parts: dermatoxic, cardiotoxic, and gastrotoxic; possibly fatal

Onions - all parts: gastrotoxic in animals

Orange - oil: dermatoxic and gastrotoxic in animals

Peach - seeds and leaves: cytotoxic in large doses

Pokeweed - leaves, berries, and roots: gastrotoxic; often fatal

Poison Ivy/Oak/Sumac - all parts, especially leaves: dermatoxic; possibly fatal

Poison Ryegrass (Darnel) - seeds: neurotoxic

Potato - raw: cytotoxic

Privet - berries and leaves: neurotoxic and gastrotoxic; possibly fatal

Ragwort - all parts: hepatotoxic

Redoul - all parts: gastrotoxic, neurotoxic, and causes respiratory issues; can be fatal in children

Rhubarb - leaves: nephrotoxic

Skullcap - hepatotoxic

Spindle (Spindle Tree) - fruit: hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic; possibly fatal  

Stinging Tree (Gympie Gympie) - bark and sap: dermatoxic; sometimes fatal

Strychnine Tree - seeds: neurotoxic; often fatal

Sweet Pea - seeds: neurotoxic and damaging to connective tissues

Tomato - leaves and stems: cytotoxic in large doses

Uva Ursi - neurotoxic, dermatoxic 

White Baneberry (Doll’s Eyes) - all parts, especially berries: cardiotoxic; possibly fatal

White Snakeroot - all parts: gastrotoxic; often fatal

Winter Cherry (Jerusalem Cherry) - all parts, especially berries: gastrotoxic; occasionally fatal, especially to children

Wisteria - gastrotoxic

Yew (English Yew, Common Yew) - leaves and seeds: gastrotoxic if ingested and respiratory issues if inhaled


definitions of terms used in this list: 

  • carcinogenic - a substance that can cause cancer
  • cardiotoxic - toxic to the heart 
  • cytotoxic - toxic to living cells
  • dermatoxic - toxic to the skin
  • gastrotoxic - toxic to the gastrointestinal system (stomach, intestines, etc.)
  • hepatotoxic - toxic to the liver
  • nephrotoxic - toxic to the kidneys and urological system (ureters, bladder)
  • neurotoxic - toxic to the neurological system (brain, nerves, brainstem, spinal cord, etc.)
  • psychoactive - pertaining to substances that change brain function and result in alterations in perception, mood, or consciousness

last updated: 1-10-2016

A handy list of poisons for writing reference, provided to you by me, Bella

Poisoning is one of the oldest murder tactics in the books. It was the old equalizer, and while it’s often associated with women, historically men are no less likely to poison you. This is not a guide on how to poison people, you banana bunches, it’s a guide on writing about poisons in fiction so you don’t end up on a watch list while researching them. I’ve taken that hit for you. You’re welcome. These are just a few of the more classic ones.

  • Hemlock: Hemlock (conium maculatum) is one of the more famous ones, used in ancient times most notably in Socrates’ forced suicide execution. So it goes. The plant has bunches of small, white flowers, and can grow up to ten feet tall. It’s a rather panicky way to die, although it wouldn’t show: hemlock is a paralytic, so the cause of death is most often asphyxiation due to respiratory paralysis, although the mind remains unaffected and aware.
  • Belladonna: Atropa belladonna is also called deadly nightshade. It has pretty, trumpet-shaped purple flowers and dark, shiny berries that actually look really delicious which is ironic since it’s the most toxic part of the plant. The entire plant is poisonous, mind you, but the berries are the most. One of the most potent poisons in its hemisphere, it was used as a beauty treatment, so the story says, and rubbed into the eyes to make the eyes dilate and the cheeks flush. Hench the name beautiful lady. The death is more lethargic than hemlock, although its symptoms are worse: dilated pupils, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, tachycardia, loss of balance, staggering, headache, rash, flushing, severely dry mouth and throat, slurred speech, urinary retention, constipation, confusion, hallucinations, delirium, and convulsions. It’s toxic to animals, but cattle and rabbits can eat it just fine, for some reason. 
  • Arsenic: Arsenic comes from a metalloid and not a plant, unlike the others here, but it’s easily the most famous and is still used today. Instead of being distilled from a plant, chunks of arsenic are dug up or mined. It was once used as a treatment for STDs, and also for pest control and blacksmithing, which was how many poisoners got access to it. It was popular in the middle ages because it looked like a cholera death, due to acute symptoms including stomach cramps, diarrhea, confusion, convulsions, vomiting, and death. Slow poisoning looked more like a heart attack. The Italians famously claimed that a little arsenic improved the taste of wine.
  • Strychnine: Strychnine (strick-nine) is made from the seed of strychnos nux vomica and causes poisoning which results in muscular convulsions and eventually death through asphyxia. Convulsions appear after inhalation or injection—very quickly, within minutes—and take somewhat longer to manifest after ingestion, around approximately 15 minutes. With a very high dose, brain death can occur in 15 to 30 minutes. If a lower dose is ingested, other symptoms begin to develop, including seizures, cramping, stiffness, hypervigilance, and agitation. Seizures caused by strychnine poisoning can start as early as 15 minutes after exposure and last 12 – 24 hours. They are often triggered by sights, sounds, or touch and can cause other adverse symptoms, including overheating, kidney failure, metabolic and respiratory acidosis. During seizures, abnormal dilation, protrusion of the eyes, and involuntary eye movements may occur. It is also slightly hallucinogenic and is sometimes used to cut narcotics. It also notably has no antidote. In low doses, some use it as a performance enhancer.
  • Curare: Chondrodendron tomentosum is lesser known than its famous cousins, but kills in a very similar way to hemlock. It is slow and terrible, as the victim is aware and the heart may beat for many minutes after the rest of the body is paralyzed. If artificial respiration is given until the poison subsides, the victim will survive.
  • WolfsbaneAconitum has several names; Monkshood, aconite, Queen of Poisons, women’s bane, devil’s helmet) and is a pretty, purple plant with gourd-shaped flowers. The root is the most potent for distillation. Marked symptoms may appear almost immediately, usually not later than one hour, and with large doses death is near instantaneous. Death usually occurs within two to six hours in fatal poisoning. The initial signs are gastrointestinal including nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. This is followed by a sensation of burning, tingling, and numbness in the mouth and face, and of burning in the abdomen. In severe poisonings pronounced motor weakness occurs and sensations of tingling and numbness spread to the limbs. The plant should be handled with gloves, as the poison can seep into the skin.
  • FoxgloveDigitalis is large with trumpet-shaped flowers that can be many colors, but usually a pinkish shade. It may have from the term foxes-glew, which translated to fairy music. Intoxication causes nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, as well as sometimes resulting in xanthopsia (jaundiced or yellow vision) and the appearance of blurred outlines (halos), drooling, abnormal heart rate, cardiac arrhythmias, weakness, collapse, dilated pupils, tremors, seizures, and even death. Slowed heartbeat also occurs. Because a frequent side effect of digitalis is reduction of appetite and the mortality rate is low, some individuals have used the drug as a weight-loss aid. It looks a bit like comfrey, which is an aid for inflammation. Make sure not to confuse the two.
Forest Witch Tip: Poisonous doppelgangers🌿🌱

This is a list of some of the most confusing plants to identify, with dangerous evil twins (although they may be good for curses). Remember not to eat ANYTHING in the wild unless you’re 100% certain what it is. It’s especially important for us hedge witches who tend to forage vs grow and all kinds of nature witches to know what we’re picking. 




Sweet almonds vs. Bitter almonds

The sweet almonds that are bought, sold, and enjoyed in the U.S. and in most countries have only a negligible amount of cyanide in them, but bitter almonds—which are shorter and wider than their sweet cousins—can contain 42 times as much. This high cyanide content means that children can be fatally poisoned by eating just five to ten bitter almonds, and adults by eating around 50. Even a handful of bitter almonds can lead to dizziness or vertigo, weakness, difficulty breathing, and numerous other symptoms in adults 


Wild grapes VS. Moonseed

Menispermum canadense, or “Canadian moonseed,” produces fruit so similar in appearance to grapes and other pleasant edibles that it can blend in with the Vitis bunch if you’re not careful. The plant is toxic for humans from root to leaf-tip, and its moonseed berries—which have a single, crescent-shaped seed each, unlike grapes’ round ones—can easily prove fatal when eaten due to their toxic lode of dauricine.  Moonseeds also reportedly taste just awful (generally speaking, this is a good sign you should spit something out). 


Carrot, parsnips vs hemlock 

The above-ground plants of wild carrots (Daucus carota, widely known as Queen Anne’s Lace) and parsnips (Pastinaca sativa) can look a lot like hemlock’s, and the roots below can appear similar, too (especially when they’ve just been pulled out of the ground).


For the record, wild parsnip poses its own threat, too. Especially during flowering season, its sap can cause skin reactions which can range from a simple rash to something very much like a lasting, second-degree burn. So if you do go root-hunting (staying well clear of hemlock, of course), you’ll do well to use gloves and skin-covering clothing whenever possible.


Wild blueberry vs Tutsan

blueberries have a potentially deadly lookalike that’s spread from its native Eurasian zones to New Zealand, Australia, and North America. The black berries of Hypericum androsaemum, a.k.a. tutsan or “sweet amber” bushes, can do a decent blueberry impression but can cause gastrointestinal distress, weakness, raised heart-rate, and other symptoms in both people and animals, and especially in children. In general, eager berry-pickers should do some careful research before foraging in the wild, as a wide variety of berries are moderately to highly toxic, including strychnine tree berries, and holly berries

There’s a lot of cool human experiences that have happened countless times, but humans haven’t always been around, so I wonder when the first time the following things happened:

  • We built boats fast enough that dolphins could ride the wake, and how much excited hooting that must have produced
  • Related: First time anybody saw a Blue Whale, and the resulting freakout
  • The first time “small talk” happened
  • cheese
  • no really how the fuck did we get cheese it was a good move but this confuses me
  • First human to see a penguin, and how badly did they take it?  What cruel god(s) create flightless birds?
  • First human to see humor in their own misery- I hurt my hand with the chisel but that must’ve looked hilarious
  • I know words for colors took a long time to come around, and I’m imaging the first red vs. “blood orange” debate
  • body piercings?  let’s put  bits of metal in sensitive areas for #aesthetic
  • first time people realized some not immediately-fatal stuff is poisonous (see: arsenic, in small enough doses)
  • First Fanfiction
4

pamela isley / poison ivy

“   men, the most absurd of god’s creatures. we give you life… and we can take it away just as easily.  ”

femme fatales / catwoman

(please do not repost, remove my caption, or claim as your own!)

Sacred Plants and Trees of the Druid- The Birch Tree

    The Birch Tree has a multitude of uses, from tinder, paper, tanning leather, nets, ropes, baskets, and so much more. The Birch also has a lot of medicinal benefits with the use of various parts of the Tree.


Birch Leaf Oil: Pick leaves in late Spring or early Summer while they are still fresh and light in colour. Fill a clean jar with the leaves and top with either extra virgin olive oil or almond oil making sure all leaves are covered 1/4″ from the lip of the jar, place lid on jar and put in a sunny place indoors and leave for a month shaking the jar daily. After a month strain off and put oil into sterile storage bottles and label. 

This can be used as a message oil for cellulite, fibromyalgia, rheumatism, and other muscle aches and pains. It can be used to treat eczema and psoriasis


Birch Leaf Tea: Pick fresh leaves in Spring or early Summer and dehydrate them until crisp, store in a dry container. To make a Birch tea, place 4 or 5 leaves in a cup or mug of boiling water, allow to infuse for 5-10 minutes. Dose: A cup three times daily.

Birch leaf tea is used to treat kidney stones, urinary gravel, cystitis, gout, arthritis, rheumatism, fluid retention, fevers.


Birch Sap: To collect Birch sap, a shallow hole is drilled through the bark of the Birch in the early Spring before the Tree gets it’s leaves. Insert a straw or tube that fits tightly in the hole, place the other end of the straw or tube into a collection bottle. After collecting for a week make sure you plug the hole up with a twig that tightly fits in the drilled hole so the Tree stops bleeding.

The sap is a refreshing drink as it comes out of the Tree, or it can be simmered down to produce an amber in colour syrup. The Birch sap is used as a cleansing tonic. Birch sap is rich in fructose where Maple has sucrose, where sucrose is sweeter, the Birch sap is a cooler, refreshing, and clear drink. Known to be the drink of the Elves.


With everything, be sure to talk to your healthcare provider before use. Don’t use Birch if you are pregnant or breast-feeding, use with caution if you have seasonal allergies or known hyper-sensitivity to plant allergens. Keep Birch preparations out of reach of children as Birch oil contains 98% methyl salicylate, which has been fatal to children. Poisoning has occurred with as little as 4.7 grams of methyl salicylate applied topically.

Arawn

Druids of Gaul Order of Canada

D&D Homebrew Poisons

So, im working on a mini series for badassdanddpics and was wondering if you guys had any ideas. im calling the mini series “Bewildering Botany and Perilous Poisons” that will basically showcase magical plant homebrew that will aid adventures and villains alike. for the poison section of it, i put together some basic information from D&D about the rules as well as how they are applied and used against others as well as common symptoms from plants in the real world.

different poisons are applied to victims by

  • contact
  • ingested
  • inhaled
  • injury
  • smoke from being burned

common rules (for 5th edition D&D regarding poison)

  • A weapon coated with poison will dry out in one minute.
  • When you are poisoned, you will usually suffer from the poisoned condition.
  • Poison can be bought or crafted using the downtime rules and a poisoner’s kit.
  • Cures for poison include low level spells or anti-toxin.
  • Truth Serum is listed under poisons, and is something I think could be useful in your campaign in many different ways.
  • Poisoned: A poisoned creature has disadvantage on attack rolls and ability checks.
  • each round until you make a saving throw.

Common symptoms of poisoning include nausea, vomiting, convulsions, liver failure, disables nerves, lowers blood pressure, and can stop the heart, muscle twitches, and sometimes paralysis, irritation of skin throat and mouth, swelling, burning pain, breathing difficulties and stomach upset. dilated pupils, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, tachycardia, loss of balance, staggering, headache, rash, flushing, dry mouth and throat, slurred speech, urinary retention, constipation, confusion, hallucinations, delirium, convulsions and photo-toxicity

underneath the “keep reading” i have included some actual plants that could help with creating realistic homebrew.

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

Hey, can I ask a favour? I'm writing a book, and I wonder if you can tell me some plants that would act as good poisons? Both fatal and not. And something that could be used in torture. (I promise this is for a book!) Thanks.

Ah, going Tory-hunting, are we? Good good. “For a book”, got it.

Okay! So, yes, is the answer. I don’t know how broadly you want to go into the World Of Plants, in terms of global distribution? But since you’re asking me, I’m guessing you want some UKvian/north west European answers. I also don’t know how historical you need me to be, so I’ll stick to natives where I can.

Also, it should be noted that pretty much any plant can kill you if you eat enough of it? But I’m assuming you want something a bit more ‘contained in a mysterious phial’ or ‘chopped into a soup’ rather than ‘six tonnes of common daisy, eat up, Your Majesty’.

Fatal Shit

The foxglove (Digitalis purpurea). Very pretty plant that loves hedges and forests and occasionally comes in white:

You know that scene in Casino Royale where Bond is poisoned and has to shoot himself up in his car to not die? That was digitalis, i.e. the active compound in these things. It fucks up your heart and that. In fact, the medicinal compound that has been scientifically extracted from digitalis - digoxin - is used in modern medicine, but straight from the plant is toxic.

It’s possible to simply really fuck someone up with these, but very easy to outright kill them, and a fine line to walk. It wouldn’t be easy to intentionally give them just a low dose. 

***

Deadly Nightshade, (Atropa belladonna). I like this one! In extremely low doses it’s a herb, actually, so there’s even narrative Plausible Deniability for it being in a kitchen/people getting overdosed.

This is it:

This, on the other hand, is not:

That’s Woody Nightshade, or Solarum dulcamara, which is also poisonous but rarely fatally so, and seems to be plastered throughout the internet on primarily USian sites labelled as Deadly Nightshade. 

Anyway. The berries and leaves are the deadly bits, and cause delirium and hallucinations. And, you know, death. This one is easier to control for effect than digitalis, mind, so you can poison or kill here. It’s also been used as a cosmetic, because it can make the pupils dilate, which as we all know, is the sexiest part of the human body.

It’s antidote is physostigmine, found naturally in the Calabar bean from Nigeria, although it is itself pretty poisonous. Or I think pilocarpine works, which is found in a South American plant, but I don’t know which.

***

The Yew Tree, (Taxus baccata). A particularly great entrant to any list, frankly. Love me a yew.

LOOK HOW BEAUTIFUL anyway, yew trees were worshipped by Celtic peoples as representing a Cult of Immortality, because they live for literally thousands of years. They are also almost entirely poisonous. Like… leaves, bark, wood seeds, everything. The only thing that isn’t, ironically, is the flesh of the berries, and as long as you didn’t chew - and therefore break - the seeds, they’d probably pass right through you and be fine. But as few as three seeds would poison you.

Also, most plants lose their toxins after pruning. Not yew. Cut branches are just as dangerous.

The fun bit is the symptoms, because most times, there aren’t any. You just die a few hours after eating. Some indigestion, like. That’s it. If there are, we’re looking at shaking, coldness, and falling over a lot. 

***

Hellebore (Helleborus spp). Pretty plants that flower in winter, so people like them.

The roots are toxic, causing wicked D and V and also death if you eat too much. People used to give them to kids to try to de-worm them, and a lot of kids died that way.

Interestingly, though, the seeds in particular cause skin problems after contact - burning and itching, usually. Potentially a good Clue for who the poisoner is, if their hands are all itchy and that.

***

Ragwort (Senecio jacobaea). So, in the Real World there are precious few examples of people being poisoned by ragwort, though plenty of it happening to horses; but that’s because we’re generally pretty careful with the stuff, and also it’s not fatal to most.

The exception is people with liver problems.

Someone with any sort of liver condition could be killed by this stuff, because at high enough levels it will cause complete liver failure. But, you’d have to either make them eat about 14lbs of the plant in one go (unlikely), or you’d have to make them drink it as a herbal tea over a long period (more likely). The toxins don’t accumulate in the body, but the liver damage does. It was for a while considered to be a cough remedy, too, so it’s a good one for plausible deniability.

Symptoms include lethargy, staggering, walking around like a zombie, and sometimes blindness.

***

Hemlock Water-Dropwort (Oenanthe crocata). Yeah, this is hemlock, Famous Poison of Antiquity. They killed many a Greek philosopher with this stuff. 

Great for plausible deniabilty - the full plant is almost identical to the fully-edible cow parsley, the stems can look like celery when chopped, and the roots look like wild parsnips. But, the toxins are quite unstable. Cooking can break them down - if not completely, then at least to survivable levels. But you’d still be sick as a dog from it, and you would need hospitalisation. 

Vomiting and nausea are the main symptoms, but convulsions and seizures are also up there. And, of course, death. There’s also some suggestion that it’s more potent in winter, and less so from April onwards? It’s unproven as of yet, but it is an interesting pattern in toxicity levels.

***

Non-Fatal

Lords and Ladies/Cuckoopint (Arum maculatum). It has approximately 8003 common names, this one, but Lords and Ladies is poetic, and cuckoopint is an old word meaning a cuckoo’s dick, so those are the ones I’ve included.

Some people apparently mistake it for wild garlic, since they grow in the same places and times? i don’t see it myself, but I’m told it’s a common mistake.

It is poisonous, but you’d have a job eating enough to kill yourself - it induces vomiting fast, and a prickly burning in the mouth even faster, so you wouldn’t be able to ingest more. This is true of both the leaves and the berries. So a good one to make someone ill, and they’d be sore for days, but very unlikely to kill someone.

***

Greater Celandine (Chelidonium majus). No relation to lesser celandine. Botany is wild.

Anyway, the juice in the stem is bright yellow and can cause nausea if ingested, and burning on the skin; historically, it was used to remove warts. But it tastes disgusting, as so many of these do, so it would have to be masked somehow. 

***

Spindle (Euonymous europaeus). Beautiful tree, five stars out of three.

Those are the berries! SO PRETTY but eating the berries will fuck you up nicely - D and V, heart palpitations, hallucinations and symptoms akin to meningitis. Unlikely to be fatal to a healthy person, mind. 

Again, though, tastes like arse.

***

‘Orrible Tortury Things

Hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium). Nawr te. Here we get nasty.

This is hogweed. Tip to tip it can be about 6 feet of chlorophylled malice, but usually it’s around the four-to-five mark. The reason for it’s inclusion here lies in the sap, which contains, essentially, a compound that turns you into a fucking vampire.

How? you may be asking. Well - through a condition called phytophotodermatitis, which is where the sap basically strips out your skin’s ability to slather on the melanin and so the moment UV light hits the spot it burns. And I mean burns. Literal burns. Want to see a gross picture?

Yeah. And it’s not a one-off burn - you have to keep the skin out of the sun for a year or so before it stops reacting, even after the burn is healed. I work with people who have had hogweed burns (in my line of work it’s a professional hazard), and even mild ones will still suddenly show up again in the shower six months later.

It’s not as bad as one of our new Invasive Species, though - Giant Hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum). That one burns. Google ‘giant hogweed burns’ for the grossest google session of your life. That causes literal third degree burns, and it’s a good six years before you’re back to normal. That’s only been about in UKvia for about 200 years, though.

In conclusion, you don’t fuck about with hogweed.

***

Stinging nettles (Urtica dioica). What list of Nast Plants would be complete without the humble stingy, eh?

We’ve all done our time with this bastard. Very common, touching the edges of the leaves produces a strong sting, a bit like mild bees. It’s entirely bearable, like, and actually, there are some people who whip their arthritic joints with nettles and report that it makes the swelling go down. But it’s not enjoyable, and being whipped with these would fucking hurt. Plus, it takes a while for the rash to fuck off.

It’s also highly nutritious and edible, though, and you can spin it into cloth. Non-stingy cloth, I might add. Go figure.

***

Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa). A wonderful tree that gives us sloes which give us delicious sloe gin.

But it also has thorns. Now - professional tree knowledge coming in here - in fact, in the moment it hurts more to be bitten by a hawthorn. But, hawthorns will merely bite, and are non-venomous.

Blackthorns are venomous. As long as you clean the cuts and, crucially, don’t leave thorns in you, you’re fine. But if you leave a thorn in you, it will give you septicemia, which can be extremely nasty. Potentially fatal, actually, so possibly this could go further up the page? Dunno how you’d manage that, though.

***

Anyway, that’s all I can think of offhand. I hope this is useful knowledge for your “book”.

10

Rain Forest Eeveelutions (Open Species, please link back to this post somewhere and give credit. I’d love to see what people do with them!)

A population of the Eevee line that developed and evolved in heavy rain forest areas. They’re smaller in size and harder to tame in captivity, making them unsuitable companion Pokemon for inexperienced trainers. Hunted for their fur, they were once considered a Vulnerable Species but are now listed as Least Concern. (Heavily based on Ocelots and various animals)

MORE INFO UNDER THE CUT CAUSE IT’S REALLY LONG

Keep reading

  • Aconite/monkshood – numbness in face and limbs; inability to walk or move arms; chest pain, heart attack; irregular heart rhythms; nausea; vomiting; abdominal pain; diarrhea
  • Angel’s trumpet/moonflower – inability to differentiate reality from fantasy; heart attack; bizarre/violent behavior; amnesia; intolerance of light
  • Asian Abrupt-bulbed Lepidella – kidney failure
  • Autumn skullcap/Deadly Galerina – symptoms begin 8-24 hrs after ingestion; abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting; symptoms stop for about 24 hrs, during this time toxins attack the liver; death occurs 5-7 days after ingestion from coma, kidney failure, and gastrointestinal bleeding
  • Azalea – salivation; watering eyes and nose; abdominal pain; loss of energy; nausea; vomiting; weakness; difficulty breathing; paralysis of arms and legs; coma
  • Bushman’s poison/dune poison bush/wintersweet – heart attack
  • Castor beans (contain ricin) – severe diarrhea; nausea; heart attack; seizures; hypotension; survivors have extensive organ damage; take 3-5 days to kill
  • Chestnut dapperling – damage to the heart and liver; headache, dizziness, back pain, gastrointestinal problems
  • Chokecherry/common chokecherry – poison found everywhere but the berry; digestion by stomach enzymes releases cyanide; giddiness; vertigo; rapid breathing; leads to deep coma, pulmonary edema, and heart attack; victims may have cherry red skin
  • Daffodil – poisonous bulbs; vomiting; diarrhea; convulsions; can be confused for onions; handling them gives you “daffodil itch”: dryness, scaling, thickening of skin beneath the nails
  • Daphne (laurel tree family) – poisonous seeds; handling fresh twigs causes rashes/eczema for people with sensitive skin; victims experience choking sensation; common ornamental plant
  • Deadly conocybe – takes 10 hours to affect body; symptoms include severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, kidney and liver damage; usually remission period lasting 1-2 days before death
  • Deadly nightshade/Belladonna – eating 2-5 berries fatal to adults; eating 1 leaf fatal to adults; roots also fatal; slightly sweet taste; leads to delirium, hallucinations, heart attack, slurred speech, constipation, confusion, sensitivity to light, blurred vision
  • Deadly parasol – 1 mushroom is deadly; victim feels fine for a day, then sick as intestines are damaged; then the victim appears to recover before dying from liver failure
  • Deadly webcap – easy to mistake for the prized chanterelle mushroom; symptoms delayed for 2-3 days before flu-like symptoms, headache, and vomiting occur, followed by kidney failure
  • Death cap (Latin American, East Asian) – looks like the edible honey and paddy straw mushrooms; half a cap can kill a human; toxicity not reduced by cooking, freezing, or drying; taste good; early symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, and vomiting; symptoms go away from a few days; symptoms return in form of jaundice, diarrhea, delirium, seizures, tachycardia, and kidney failure; survivors usually need liver transplants; fatality rate before the 20th century was 70-80%; now it’s around 10-15% in developed countries; people usually die in 6-10 days
  • Destroying angel (Eastern North American, Guangzhou, Great Felt Skirt, Western North American, European) – easy to confuse with edible white button mushroom; see death cap for symptoms, as they both contain the same kind of toxin
  • Doll’s eye/White baneberry – entire plant is poisonous; poison fatally slows human heart; handling plant causes blisters; eating it causes gastrointestinal distress as well as a slowed heartbeat
  • English yew – highest concentration of poison in the seeds; blue-colored lips, difficulty breathing, coma, convulsions, enlarged pupils, irregular heartbeat, nausea, muscle pain, trembling, vomiting
  • Ergot/St Anthony’s Fire (archaic) – poisonous fungi that grows on rye; symptoms include nausea, vomiting, headache, muscle pain, itching, gangrene, vision problems, confusion, spasms, and convulsions

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Fatal Flowers #3

Latuca Serriola AKA Prickly Lettuce AKA that one-weed-you-see-growing-on the-street

Prickly Lettuce is not actually fatal. It’s technically poisonous but it is a very useful plant! It contains Lactucarium which is a sedative, it is a less powerful alternative to opium (which I’ll be discussing later).  It is a good painkiller, and if eaten in large amounts can be used as a laxative. If you hold it for too long then it can irritate your skin, but it’s not even that bad. Pro? It can be found ANYWHERE!

Toxic rating: 1/10! It is just as bad as grass but twice as useful! 

It literally can be found anywhere! It is pretty easy to spot, check the belly of the leaves for small prickly “thorns”. 

What do horses eat? In the real world, horses mostly graze on grass, but will also eat pretty much anything that catches their eye.

I know that the foods most commonly given to horses as treats are apples and carrots, and that horses are known to sometimes eat fermented apples (which can intoxicate them) or acorns (which can fatally poison them) off of the ground. I also seem to recall (from the book Black Beauty?) that horses like sugar cubes.

It’s chow time! For the record, you can’t actually feed your horse like this; I tried, as it made for nice framing with the item in the center of the image with its name clearly displayed, but as it turns out your horse will only eat things from your hands or from ground it can walk on.

Anyway, I tried giving Toolie all of the materials that Link can eat. She ate the Swift Carrot, Endura Carrot, and apple, but nothing else interested her. I had saved before testing, and reloaded after every test, so it wasn’t a matter of her being full. I’m a little disappointed; I fully expected her to eat the sugar, wheat, and maybe radishes. The giant hunks of raw red meat, not so much.

As I was finishing up (without much to show for my efforts), I realized… hey, if horses will eat apples off of the ground, then what about baked apples?

Confirmed! Horses don’t have a visible life bar, so there’s no way to know whether these heal more HP than normal apples… or is there? Am I going to have to test horse health at some point? Oh god.

MOVING RIGHT ALONG, it occurred to me that it would be possible to test whether roasting gives horses added benefits by using an Endura Carrot, as the stamina boost it gives DOES have a visible indicator. Is it even possible to roast carrots, though? I’ve somehow never thought to try…

Nice! Man, that makes me hungry. Well, let’s get to testing! I don’t even know if a horse will eat a cooked carrot, but we’ll find out shortly.

Toolie has a base stamina of three, which is much more visible at night.

The Endura Carrot gave her an additional three stamina! I don’t use horses a lot, so I actually don’t know whether it always give three, if it doubles their stamina, or what. I know that the maximum stamina is normally five… Let me go check out my other horses real quick.

Buttercup here has a base stamina of five, and also got three additional spurs.

Onox, meanwhile, has zero stamina… or “–” stamina, though I think that just means the giant horse is unable to be spurred. Even after eating five Endura Carrots, he refused to be spurred on.

Back in Hateno, it looks like Toolie’s interested in the roasted carrot! If a food they’re willing to eat is on the ground nearby, they’ll walk up and eat it; if they don’t want to eat it, they’ll remain completely stationary.

…aaaand it appears that cooking the carrot didn’t affect the stamina it gives. Oh well, now we know. It might still heal more hearts, but I’m probably going to have to experiment with horse health to test that out. If you found this interesting, you might also want to check out my other Zelda experiments.

Malanya, the God of Horses, is going to be very angry with me…