fashionable buffy

bisummers asked: I think i missed the au party but buffy+ willow + an event involving formalwear

  • in her late twenties, buffy goes back to college to finish her degree. she is allowed 2 guests at her convocation, and invites willow (who is currently her girlfriend) and dawn.
  • dawn decides to wear the dress she wore to her own convocation (which was just a couple years ago), but buffy and willow shop for new ones. it’s kind of a big deal for buffy, so they go all out. willow ends up with something kinda witchy, but classy. buffy, still a prom queen at heart after all these years, buys something long and shimmery.
  • willow finds her dress pretty quickly. it’s sort of a hey-look-that’s-the-one-i-hope-it-fits kinda deal.
  • buffy, however, tries on about half the dresses in the mall. in each fitting room, with each dress she likes, she twirls in front of the mirror so that she can feel how swishy the material is. willow indulges her because buffy looks So Beautiful. (“okay. maybe not this one.” “i dunno, buffy. spin around one more time?”)
  • the morning of, once they’re all dressed up, willow conjures some flowers and places them carefully in buffy’s hair.
  • after the ceremony, buffy and willow and dawn go out for a Fancy Lunch at an expensive restaurant nearby, because they’re all dressed up, so they may as well, right?
  • it’s one of the best days of buffy’s life. (she tells willow this in the evening at their apartment when they’ve switched back to pyjama mode.)
10

The Influencers: Laura Palmer

Laura Palmer: Twin Peaks’ Homecoming Queen and Centerpiece

It all started with a Homecoming Queen. She was dead and wrapped in plastic. The hauntingly beautiful blonde North Pacific teenage dream washed up on shore, nearby the Northern Lodge is what started it all. Laura Palmer was the American Dream the bore the secrets of a hellish life and a gruesome end. And yet, her story doesn’t just yet. Laura Palmer was Town Peaks’ savior. Ripped from the innocents, she dabbled in the darkness of the woods but she never let her conscious be sucked out.

According to her secret diary, young Laura has seen over 40 sexual deviants.From the violent Leo Johnson to the corrupt Ben Horne, the sultriness of the blonde bombshell was too captive to bear. Designed as a Marilyn Monroe mockup, Palmer eerily shares Norma Jean’s descent to death in a manner no other Marilyn biopic could. Her innocence was snuffed from out of her, even before she bled to death.

Ayn Rand once wrote this about Marilyn: “Marilyn Monroe on the screen was an image of pure, innocent, childlike joy in living. She projected the sense of a person born and reared in some radiant utopia untouched by suffering, unable to conceive of ugliness or evil, facing life with the confidence, the benevolence, and the joyous self-flaunting of a child or a kitten who is happy to display its own attractiveness as the best gift it can offer the world, and who expects to be admired for it, not hurt”

That figure that radiated a brim of light and utopia among the proverbial hypocrisies of the town buried in secrets is very much like Laura herself. Her smile and bright eyes were forced to see people and the alters for what they really were. Imagine the world where all your heroism and good deeds have no importance because the pain is just too unreal. You are the captive of your own parent’s sexual deviances. You are the pawn in “The Evil that Men Do.” To live your life as the sexual prey that lingers and consumes your father is morally reprehensible.

When you see Bob inhabit Cooper in the new season, we see a different man, absolutely. But everything Bad Cooper does is in tune with survivalism, with the nature of his job, and with his take on what’s the difference between morally and ethically good and bad. Even the murders are not of significant impertinence because he sees this part of his job. It’s the Hit Man or the Bounty Hunter. You cross the line, you paid with your life. This may be because deep down, the doppelganger is the duality of all the bad that lies inside Cooper. This is a Cooper with a freewill and choice to do unrepentant harm more than the choice to be good. The Bob here seems content to wreak havoc yet humane. This Bob Cooper appears to be lascivious, crude, and detached to the lightness. He operates in the dark where he can trap the creatures of the night. His entourage is these hooligans who look like they should be a part of Deliverance.

Leland Palmer, on the hand, is obtusely repugnant because as mentioned in the original series, his entire conscious was raped and carved out of him. His whole being and sense of right and wrong are influenced by Bob himself who is more the Jiminy Cricket to Leland’s Pinocchio. Yes, it’s horrifying to know that his own innocence was taken from him when he was just a boy but that doesn’t absolve him from the crimes he committed. He is everything described in Soundgarden’s “Black Hole Sun.” Painted smiles hiding a truth only found in nightmares.

As far as we know, this Bad Cooper doesn’t rape because he doesn’t have to. He gets what he wants. That he makes very clear. The doppelganger knows he’s bad but there’s a charm to him because he’s upfront about it. In many ways, there’s no need to go insane because he’s not hiding behind secrets and the dualities that do belong to us. He acknowledges himself for him and he can truly enjoy his essence.

With Leland, there is a sick streak of a shadowed veneer underneath the handsome suburban lawyer father. He is constantly trying to pretend to be normal but he sticks out like a sore thumb. He’s no longer conduit for Bob. He is Bob and Bob is him. That’s why the evil spirit doesn’t want that vessel anymore. He wants someone pure like Laura and Cooper that he can just live without his garmonbozia. Leland was too much of an erratic liability to withstand. He was in complete denial of his willing participation in these crimes. He was a family man. Your lawyer (to a corrupt capitalist with his own shady deals, Ben Horne incidentally is Laura’s pimp), your upright citizen in a quaint little suburban town.

The true story here is of a girl who was saddled with the inescapable evils of the father and chose death over allowing that evil to be fully realized in her flesh. Laura is the victim of the story. This sweet innocence tainted by societal greed and cruelty. But she was a savior as well. A savior who decided to save a town mixed of worthless fools and sweet souls.

The demonic possession is a metaphor for the monster inside of us and some can’t control the evil we do. Is the story of Laura Palmer so incredulous to believe that her grieving father was responsible for the rape, torture, and subsequent death of her. When seeing the world through her eyes, we are at the precipice of what the town really is. A fake town who turned a blind eye to the next generation, allowing them to become pawns for the seeding underbelly that underscores the greed, corruption, and drugs presented to them. It’s an idyllic town full of hypocrites that will never escape their hometown glory nor will they know just how this tragic Homecoming Queen saved them and continues to save them from eternal damnation.

Laura is Buffy the Vampire Slayer without Scooby Gang support system behind her.