fashion-concept

Korean Hip-Hop imitates mainstream American Hip-Hop by stealing the concepts, fashion, music, and attitude (yes, misogyny included). Korean artists strive to be as close to the media’s idea of Blackness as possible, most of them copying each other to the point where I can’t tell some Korean rappers apart cuz their music and style is relatively the same.

So it’s really interesting to see Kpop and K Hip-Hop fans talk about how Koreans do it better, especially since there’s no creative movement behind the genre’s presence in South Korea. They latched on to Hip-Hop for the same reason most white people do. It was a way to profit off the world’s desire to be Black without having to live as a Black person.

We’ve been saying it for the longest time but I’ll say it again. Y’all only like K Hip-Hop over ours bcuz you hate Black people and/or fetishize East Asians. That is the only reason. Listening to K Hip-Hop gives you all the things you like seeing come from Black American culture, without you having to actually see Black people.

i’m jasmine masters and i have something to say

lately we’ve been able to predict the winner of rupaul’s drag race, the dark-horse, etc… i dare to say that since bianca del rio there’s a clear winner, the dark-horse and the supposed competition for the winner. but that is part of life, i get it. whatever what bothers me is that sometimes the judges panel seem to have a very narrow-minded concept of what’s drag and whenever someone defies that, that person doesn’t get the recognition that it deserves. in recent seasons we saw that happening to max(michelle’s being so annoyed with the grey wig made no sense, we don’t see her challenging queens that fit her concept of drag but that very rarely serve wildly different looks, concept i.e. roxxxy andrews who’s a fantastic drag queen and we can say fits the stereotypical mold), milk and we can say that this happened to thorgy thor in some level and now with sasha velour.

it’s quite obvious rupaul’s favorite this season is shea. shea is a fierce queen and she has been slaying the competition except sasha, maybe. sasha since the first episode has been deemed too smart and now too chic to drag. what’s ridiculous and in this week’s episode joan smalls even said she doesn’t want to see in a drag show what she sees in a runway in paris. it’s okay that drag queens have been serving as inspiration for several different designers but the moment drag queens start to actually do fashion is a problem? it bothers me that the panel on a drag queen show reinforces that drag cannot be too smart or too chic. drag has to be always over the top and only serve as concept for fashion bot not exactly do fashion? maybe i’m reading too much into it, but what joan said and also rupaul bothered me because it reflects bad on the artistry rupaul do it so well. i’m not saying sasha deserved to win this week (well i am, but that’s not the point)

i’m just reflecting on what’s been said to/about sasha this season. labelig her as too fashion/chic(polished??) and too smart. putting drag in a box of only not too smart satire and over the top. as if there’s no where to go from that. but queens like sasha and milk are actually the ones actively thinking about the gender norms, about the artistic ways of drag (i want to highlight the usage of actively because by doing drag i believe they all are, in a way, thinking those things but you can see with queens like milk and sasha those issues are actually deeply thought and rooted in their drag) anyway, this happened season after season and it’s just sad to see how reluntanct people always are to something that is a bit different from what they think or agree on. 

6

Time for FRIDAY FASHION FACT! Today’s topic is a bit more conceptual than the Facts I’ve done in the past, but I think it is very important to recognize the over-arching factors that influence fashion in order to fully understand how fashion has developed. This is a bit difficult to explain in such a small space, so bear with me, and remember that this is all much more complex than I lay it out to be.

Throughout history, the biggest influence on fashion has clearly been technology. The next biggest influence, though, has been war. War causes huge divisions between people. It drains resources. It pits agenda versus agenda, ideology versus ideology. It has the ability to effect every aspect of life. It can change the world, so it should come as no surprise that it changes fashion.

In several of my past posts, I have mentioned specific wars being an influence on fashion- most commonly the French Revolution, World War I, and World War II. While most wars have an impact on fashion, these three have had a significantly bigger impact that the rest. The reason for the World War’s having such a large impact is obvious- it’s right there in the name. These wars spanned the globe, and wider geography means wider impact.

The French Revolution, however, theoretically seems as though it would effect only France. Yet the effect of war is rarely contained only to the country in which the war takes place. In terms of fashion, during the era of the French Revolution, France was the epicenter of fashion. There are still many people who would debate that France is still the fashion capitol of the world, but in the 18th and 19th centuries, there was no debate. France reigned supreme on the style front. If the French wore a style, the rest of the western world quickly followed suit.

So why do wars have such a strong impact on fashion? Well, every war is different, so it varies from war to war. Overall, though, is due to two factors. One is because war tends to be a huge strain on resources, with vast amounts of funds and materials donated to the military effort. Secondly, war pits (at least) two groups against each other, groups with different values and goals. A person’s value system, lifestyle, etc. is often reflected in their clothing. The values of the prevailing side often seeps into the fashion of the people. Between these two factors, war often means a dramatic lifestyle change not only for the soldiers off fighting, but for those they leave at home. A change in lifestyle results in a change of dress. This is why changes in fashion that may take decades or more during peaceful times can occur over the course of just a few years during wartime.

An important thing to keep in mind, though, is that fashion does not change overnight, just like the wars that influence it do not happen overnight. As the world starts to shift, conflict rises, and war is imminent, fashion reflects the changing world. People often think that women went straight from wearing elaborate rococo gowns, complete with wide panniers, to simple cylindrical muslin dresses. Or they seem to ignore the era between structured Edwardian dresses and the untailored flapper look (though to be fair, Downton Abby has had a huge impact in changing that.) The reality is that aspects of the new styles are evident in fashion in the years leading up to the wars.

Of course, there are countless factors which have contributed to the development of fashion throughout the centuries (and don’t worry, I will cover as many as possible in upcoming Facts! Plus I’ll be sure to go into more detail about the wars I talked about in this post.) Just remember, the next time you’re looking at historical fashion and see a dramatic shift, take a look at what was happening in the world at that time!

Want to learn more about war and fashion? Check out these books:

Costume and Fashion: A Concise History, by Laver, de la Haye, and Tucker

History of World Costume and Fashion, by Daniel Delis Hill

Have a question about fashion history that you want answered in the next FRIDAY FASHION FACT? Just click the ASK button at the top of the page!

Monster High - Frankie Stein - Voltageous Fashion - From yet another late night sketch…. Maybe I will have to start actually making the dolls that feature my designs…. or look into getting my designs made into clothes :)

Might not have so much art for a while as I need to spend all my free time preparing my new house so OH and I have a nice place to live ; - ; But I will finally have a studio to work in !!


Close up here :


Process is here for those who are interested:

Soooo, yeah. Idk really, I’m not that big on fashion, but I made this for the fancy loving, but less fortunate Cybertronians. { the ones who don’t have heeeels. }

Anyhow, these are called Heel attachments, or magnetic heels whatever you prefer.

These heels have magnets embedded in the top of them, and will attach to the bottom of the Cybertronians pede/foot once in contact with the metal, they’re not exactly easy to get off, you just have to yank at them, but at least you don’t have to worry about losing one as you walk.

They all start off white, or clear, and when you’re ready to purchase them you can have their painted/customized for free, or keep them how they are.
They come in a different sizes, and different heights so you can go as crazy as you want with them.
The example above is just one example.
And there you go.

Finished the Draculaura fashion design… Not entirely happy with it but there you go… its all practice :) Video of Process - https://youtu.be/HZ6ZeVKemOU


When I am stuck with ideas or just need to draw something and don’t know what I just pick a character and draw then in different fashions and taillor the clothes for their character…. Saying that I would LOVE this outfit.

Got some Dva designs to come and probably more as well as more paintings too :)

anonymous asked:

I find trans issues to be extremely confusing. I've heard it said that gender is a social construct that doesn't or shouldn't exist. I'm uncomfortable with that idea because I have a gender and I don't want it taken away. At the same time, I worry that that stance takes identity away from other people. I'm open to the idea of gender being a spectrum, but I'm confused by the notion of moving around on that spectrum a lot. What's your perspective on the issue, as a nonbinary person?

Ah! Okay, so an important thing to keep in mind with gender is: you can but you don’t have to.

You can have a gender! You can have a gender that fits your assigned gender! You can have a gender different from your assigned gender! Or you can not have a gender at all! 

Another important thing to keep in mind is: just because something is a social construct doesn’t mean it’s inherently bad.

Justice is a social construct. It is a concept that we, as a society, have invented together. The social construct of justice can be useful–but if it’s applied badly, it can cause harm. (feuds, cycles of vengeance based on the idea of ‘justice’–you see what I mean.)

Fashion is a social construct. The idea of clothing being ‘fashionable’ is a concept that we, as a society, have invented together. The social construct of fashion can be fun–but if it’s applied badly, it can cause harm. (people shunned from a group due to not having the ‘correct’, ‘fashionable’ clothing, for example.)

Gender is a social construct. It is a concept that we, as a society, have invented together. The social construct of gender can be useful for some people–and not useful for others–and when it is applied badly, it can cause harm.

Also! When you say that you are open to the idea of gender as a spectrum, you are perhaps thinking of something like this:

But it is much more useful to think of gender like this:

The Gender Diamond!

Notice that agender is included in the gender diamond–it’s not opposed to the other options, just added to them. 

And see how there’s a spectrum that goes not just from guy to girl…but from genderqueer to agender…from girl to agender…from guy to agender…from girl to genderqueer…from guy to genderqueer…

It’s a much more nuanced thing, and helps more people to be included! 

You having a gender does not take anything away from people who do not, just as agender people not having a gender does not take away yours <3

Now–you also say you would like to understand genderfluidity–having one’s place on the gender diamond move around.

All right, so–let us return to the social construct of fashion as an aid in understanding!

Let us put fashion into a diamond-type-spectrum, like the gender diamond:

Fashion diamond, wheee!

Okay, so imagine that you wake up in the morning. You open your closet–practicality is not a concern today; you have no plans, so what you wear is entirely up to you. 

Where do you fall on the fashion diamond? 

What do you most feel expresses your inner self today? 

Let’s say that you have a week with no plans; a week to wear whatever you feel like wearing–will you always fall on the same place on the fashion diamond every day? Perhaps you will! 

Or perhaps you will move around on the fashion diamond, based on which aspect of your personality/inner self is most prominent on a particular day.

Being genderfluid is, for me, like moving around on the fashion diamond. 

Some days I will feel I am a more formal fashion person. Some days I will feel like casual clothes best reflect what I am feeling. Some days I feel that a semiformal outfit is most appropriate for my current feelings. Some days I go more towards neither casual nor formal.

Just so with my gender:

Some days I will feel closer to being guy; some days I will feel closer to being a girl. Some days I feel like an even mixture of both. Some days neither seems to fit and I feel more agender. But I am always nonbinary!

So! I hope that this has helped to answer your questions, Anon!


(also-also: the fashion diamond isn’t meant to correspond to the gender diamond–I’m not, by any means, saying that being agender is the same as wanting to wear lingerie with spikes! The fashion diamond is just meant to show that things other than gender can be arranged into diamond-style-spectrums, and that moving around on these spectrums is a possibility.)