fardel

Fresh off of the plane Omar Hassan and Jack Fardell pivot in the park of tomorrow, today. Stay tuned for more practice and park photos as the riders arrive in Shanghai for this weekend’s VPS World Championship. Visit vansparkseries.com for a full list of contenders and Friday’s live webcast schedule. 

Photo: Vern Laird

I HAVE A HAMLET PROBLEM

Okay, so I read something in my last year of college that has bothered me ever since, and I gotta get it out there.

We had a book called Backwards and Forwards by David Ball as part of the Directing course; it used Hamlet throughout to illustrate points, one of which being that Hamlet needs something to do other than mope, or the play drags and becomes unsympathetic; that Hamlet is actively planning rather than passively dithering. You can agree with that or not, but this is what bugs me:

Ball points out a certain line from the famous “To be or not to be” soliloquy/monologue (depending on whether or not you think he knows he’s being watched): “Death,/ the undiscover’d country from whose bourn/ no traveller returns.” An poignant, haunting statement, a key jewel in the diadem of the speech. But what’s the problem?

Hamlet knows that, sometimes, a traveller does return. He has seen the ghost.

So is the whole monologue, as Ball suggests, merely an act for his audience, to make them believe him suicidal? Is his heart in it at all? If not, how is it to be played? Does the actor show he’s acting, undermining the ideas of the speech? Or does he play it straight, letting the audience miss the point?

It bothers me, because I love the speech, and it resonated with me when I was Going Through Some Stuff. I like to resolve it at least a little by thinking Shakespeare took a moment to step outside the strict bounds of the plot to make a stand-alone statement. It must have been on his mind for him to express it so eloquently (and he comes back to it; compare with Claudio’s speech [”Ay, but to die and go we know not where”] in Measure for Measure).

Still, if I were directing it, I wouldn’t be perfectly sure what to do with that speech. Discuss?

(Illustration by Kate Beaton)

me: stop being so dramatic

me: To be, or not to be- that is the question:
Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them. To die- to sleep-
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heartache, and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to. 'Tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish’d. To die- to sleep.
To sleep- perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub!
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause. There’s the respect
That makes calamity of so long life.
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
Th’ oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely,
The pangs of despis’d love, the law’s delay, 
The insolence of office, and the spurns
That patient merit of th’ unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? Who would these fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life, 
But that the dread of something after death-
The undiscover’d country, from whose bourn
No traveller returns- puzzles the will,
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of? 
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all,
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pith and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry 
And lose the name of action.- Soft you now!
The fair Ophelia!- Nymph, in thy orisons
Be all my sins rememb'red. 

Benedict Cumberbatch performs Hamlet’s Third Soliloquy - To Be Or Not To Be - Hamlet Act 3 Scene 1 - From the 2015 National Theatre Live production of Shakespeare’s Hamlet.

To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, ‘tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish’d. To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there’s the respect
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law’s delay,
The insolence of office and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? Who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscover’d country from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pith and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action.

anonymous asked:

It's all fun and games until it's not anymore. Here we go l, and you really sense the people are going to start getting wound up and upset and broken hearted all over again. They have very clearly stated that they are not a couple . If shipping can just be wanting them to be a couple that's great. But I'm just getting a sense that there's going to be a whole new round of heartbreak and I'm not really interested in staying and watching.

To believe, or not to believe– that is the question:

Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of someone else’s opposing beliefs and scroll on by
Or to take arms against a sea of make believe troubles
And by opposing end them. To die, to sleep–
No more–and by a sleep to say we end
The heartache, and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to. 'Tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wished. To die, to sleep–
To sleep–perchance to dream that Sam Heughan will show up naked on my doorstep and personally thank me for slaying shippers… ay, there’s the rub,
For in that sleep of death what dreams of naked Heughan may come
When we have shuffled off this preposterous idea that he loves his bff coworker,
Must give us pause. There’s the respect
That makes calamity of so long life.
For who would bear the whips and scorns of Tumblr lunatics, Th’ oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely
The pangs of despised love, the law’s delay,
The insolence of social media, and the spurns
That patient merit of th’ unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare arse on my doorstep? Who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under such sumptuous man meat,
But that the dread of someone much closer,
The tall aesthetically pleasing Celtic demon, whose side
No Heughan ever leaves untouched, puzzles the will,
And makes us rather pissed off and clingy to false notions we have
That he fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all,
And thus the idiotic hue of resolution
Is sicklied o'er with a cast of untrue thought,
And enterprise of great pitch and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry
And lose all common sense and dignity. – Soft you now,
The fair Trashbag! – Nymph, in thy orisons
Be all my sins remembered.

youtube

Hamlet, To Be or Not to Be in Original Pronunciation, Recited by Ben Crystal

For reference, here are the words to the soliloquy:  

To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, ’tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish’d. To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there’s the respect
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law’s delay,
The insolence of office and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? Who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscover’d country from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pith and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action –Soft you now!
The fair Ophelia!

2

To be, or not to be: that is the question: Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep; No more; and by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to, ‘tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish’d. To die, to sleep; To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause: there’s the respect That makes calamity of so long life; For who would bear the whips and scorns of time, The oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely, 

The pangs of despised love, the law’s delay, The insolence of office and the spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes, When he himself might his quietus make With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear, To grunt and sweat under a weary life, But that the dread of something after death, The undiscover’d country from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of? Thus conscience does make cowards of us all; And thus the native hue of resolution Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought, And enterprises of great pith and moment With this regard their currents turn awry, And lose the name of action.—Soft you now! The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons Be all my sins remember’d.  

Furt, Act III, Scene I [To be, or not to be] Emily Sonnett, 1993-2017.

“To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish’d. To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there’s the respect
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law’s delay,
The insolence of office and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscover’d country from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pith and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action.–Soft you now!
The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons
Be all my sins remember’d!”

—-

William Shakespeare, Hamlet

—-

Graphic - Takato Yamamoto

10

Van Doren Invitational: Mens Pro Skate Qualifiers 

Yesterdays Mens Pro Skate Qualifiers was another scorcher at the Van Doren Invitational at the Vans US Open in Huntington Beach, CA. Only 10 out of the 32 skaters could advanced to the Semi-finals where they will meet the 10 prequalified skaters in todays finale. Watch live today at 3pm PST at vansusopenofsurfing.com


Qualifiers Final Results:

1 - Willy Lara,  87.61

2 - Alex Sorgente,  84.97

3 - Marlon Silva,  82.26

4 - Robin Bolian,  82.18

5 - Daniel Vargas,  81.15

6 - Chris Gregson,  79.74

7 - Riley Stevens,  78.67

8 - Patrick Ryan,  78.33

9 - Charlie Blair,  77.57

10 - Jack Fardell,  76.29

Photos: Michael Burnett & Grant Hatfield