fantasy myth

When she turned sixteen, the princess wished for a needle. “I want to sew a bit,” she wrote on a note and put it into the basket that went down her tower for food and books. “Just so I have something to do.”

When she received it, tucked under berries and cheese, the princess took the needle between two fingers. She went down the tower and to the door where the dragon lay.

“Beast,” the princess said.

The dragon said nothing. The chain around its neck was golden and terrible. Its wings were folded. It lay still and looked at the princess.

She lifted her hand. The needle gleamed silver in the dragon fire under the beast’s belly. “I can unleash you.”

For a while, the dragon only looked. It looked and looked, and then it opened its jaws. “And what do you want in return?”

The princess smiled. She went over to the dragon and pushed the needle into the lock sealing its neck.

“What do you want?” the dragon asked again. But the princess said nothing.

While she worked, the beast slowly shifted to its feet, and the princess did not flinch when hot breath flooded over the scars on her naked shoulder blades. She did not tremble when the dragon nudged her where her wings used to be, neither when it sniffed where horns used to adore her bald head, nor when it nosed at the burns that torches had left on her four arms.

The chain fell. A shudder went through the dragon’s body. It took a deep breath, its throat bulged, and magic erupted from its freed lungs. The door on the bottom of the tower burnt to ashes.

The princess smiled.

“Well,” the dragon said when they stood outside and looked at the sky. “Now you must tell me.”

And still, the princess smiled, a slow and horrifying little smile that stuck to her tiny mouth. The dragon stumbled away from her, terror shooting through his veins. He was up in the sky within seconds, but the princess only looked at him.

When she spoke, it echoed across the clearing deep in the forest, and the dragon in the sky shuddered from her soft voice that sang gently:

“I want to ask them why they did not lock me up a bit better.”

reddit.com
[Possible spoilers?] My friend wanted to know more about Cor's backstory, so I filled him in... • /r/FFXV
- Cor is the one who put the Adamantoise to sleep in the first place. - He's the guy who placed a weapon in the royal tomb in the volcano. - Cor...

Looks like the folks at r/ffxv are making Cor into the legend he truly is, and I am 1000% on board.

literature genres

Gryffindor: Anything gripping and Nonsense; at least it shouldn’t get boring. Gryffindors are only enthusiastic about books with a fluent story; otherwise they’d stop reading in the middle of the book. About the half of the Gryffindors actually read a lot of books; the others aren’t really passionate about reading.

Slytherin: Nonsense and Horror. Just like the Gryffindors, they hate stories that flatten down in the middle. Slytherins usually read a lot and share their muggle books (after the war against Voldemort, they got more tolerable with muggles and mudbloods), so they’re all reading the same books and nobody’s alone in their fandom.

Ravenclaw: The most of the Ravenclaws are fond of either dramas and non-fiction or real stories. They don’t really like made-up, surreal stories and fiction, except old tales and myths; they also read and write a lot of poems. Only a few purebloods read muggle books because the Ravenclaws usually like to buy the books themselves.

Hufflepuff: They’re having a soft spot for Comedy and schmaltzy Romance. The Ravenclaws find it pretty tasteless of the Hufflepuffs for liking kitschy books, but they actually just read them for fun. Hufflepuffs never really take novels they read in their spare time serious; that’s why they avoid creepy or serious texts. They basically read for amusement.

the houses as literature genres requested by anon

inbox is open!

echidna aesthetic

in Greek mythology, Echidna (/ɪˈkɪdnə/; Greek: Ἔχιδνα, “She-Viper”) was a monster, half-woman and half-snake, who lived alone in a cave. She was the mate of the fearsome monster Typhon, and known primarily for being the mother of monsters, including many of the most famous monsters of Greek myth.