fandom wiki

anonymous asked:

I guess the long answer, cause I'm pretty curious

alright. let me take you back, anon. let me take you back to a time that was nearly precisely 5 years ago - back to March 2nd, 2012. on this date, the movie The Lorax came out. it was an adaptation of the classic dr. suess story, albeit with heavy creative liberties taken and an arguably much less poignant environmental message.

but that’s not what you need to know.

what you need to know is, the main character of the original book, the Once-ler, was given a face in this movie - the face of a young, skinny, baby-faced man with the voice of Ed Helms.

for reasons still unknown to me, the internet at the time developed an incredibly deep and immediate fixation on him - most likely due to his nonthreatening, attractive appearance and voice. a fandom began to develop around the movie, but most specifically, around this character. the most prevalent place of operation this fandom took to was tumblr, in the wake of the rapidly receding superwholock fandom.

as with most fandoms comprised of sexually frustrated teenage girls, there was a heavy emphasis on shipping. however, this movie’s main cast aside from the once-ler were either vaguely off-putting, too young, or had absolutely no interaction with the object of their desires - the once-ler. their solution to this was the most surreal and bizarre fandom uroboros that many innocent souls have ever witnessed.

they started shipping him with himself.

later in the movie, the once-ler adopts this appearance while singing the only significant musical number from this movie, How Bad Can I Be? and undergoes a pretty striking character shift as he’s blinded by his own greed. hence, the fandom began to view this green suit-wearing once-ler as a completely separate entity than the previous, innocent, vest-wearing once-ler. they subsequently dubbed this double as The Greed-ler.

past that, things began to spiral quickly and violently out of control.

how many different ways are there to cook an egg? you can ponder on this for a very, very long time - but eventually, you’ll just get bored of the taste of eggs. how many different ways are there to ship someone with themselves? if you ask the once-ler fandom, they wouldn’t be able to tell you. because they tried literally every way imaginable.

there were high school AUs. there were wolf AUs. there were countless different ways to ship this character with his own self, in every single way you could possibly stretch it, to the point of absolute unrecognizability from the source material.

and even that became tiring.

they began to ship individual body parts with each other. they began to ship articles of clothing. there were RP blogs for each and every single AU and scenario, and then some. there was an RP blog dedicated to playing AS the once-ler’s semen.

here is a list on the once-ler fandom fucking wiki of but a fraction of the number of once-ler ask/rp blogs there were. it’s endless.

for a time, the blue hellsite was the green hellsite. the green man was inescapable. after a time, it eventually faded and died down over the course of these 5 long years - active once-ler blogs are now considered cryptids. rightfully so.

the idea of shipping junkrat skins with each other is a disturbing echo of the hellish period that was once-ler fandom. best we nip it in the bud now before we enter a new era.

then again, we’ll never reach heights like this again, right? we could never even come close to doing this all over again…

how bad can we possibly be?

Reblog if you read The Property of Hate

I’m genuinely curious as to how far our little Tellyhead comic fandom goes!

2

stay classy, fangmeyer 

redwall in chronological order
  1. Lord Brocktree
  2. The Legend of Luke: In the Wake of the Red Ship
  3. Martin the Warrior
  4. Mossflower
  5. The Legend of Luke
  6. Prologue and epilogue to Mossflower
  7. Outcast of Redwall
  8. Mariel of Redwall
  9. Prologue and epilogue to Martin the Warrior
  10. The Bellmaker
  11. Salamandastron
  12. Redwall
  13. Mattimeo
  14. Pearls of Lutra
  15. The Long Patrol
  16. Marlfox
  17. Taggerung
  18. Prologue and epilogue to Lord Brocktree
  19. Triss
  20. Loamhedge
  21. Rakkety Tam
  22. High Rhulain
  23. Eulalia!
  24. Doomwyte
  25. The Sable Quean
  26. The Rogue Crew

i just thought this would be a good reference to have in the fandom, especially for people who are interested in a chronological rereading, like me!

peachykeen-piggy-prattles  asked:

ok, here's a question that's been with me for years now: so uh, what exactly is the history of the tfwiki? why is it comedic in nature? im not complaining, its just that the tfwiki is so different from all other fandom wikis that i'm curious how it got that way. did it start as a regular wiki before someone added a funny caption as a joke, and it just went from there? or was it always going to be comedic? who created it? why? forgive me if this has been asked before, but google is useless here.

“Teletraan I, the Transformers Wiki” was originally founded on Wikia (then called “Wikicities”) back in May 2005 by a user named Nova81426, with the intention that he and a friend of his would work on it as a hobby. The week after opening up the site, however, the pair were offered a big job opportunity (to take over the running of a comic book store), so their planned project had to be shelved so they could devote their time to that.

Nothing much happened to the wiki for a while, until April of 2006, when it was discovered by longtime Transformers fan David “@itswalky“ Willis. The editing of Transformers articles on Wikipedia itself had been increasingly troubled for some time thanks to the efforts of one particularly terrible editor, so Willis determined to turn “Teletraan I” into the “proper” Transformers wiki as a way to have a good online resource free of that nonsense. He chose to make it a little humorous, and the first few editors who joined him in working on the site - being from a similar era of fandom as him, and sharing a similar sense of humor from being in the same fandom circle - rolled with it.

And y’know, it might’ve ended there, with the site being somewhere these guys had fun while documenting Transformers, but instead it just kept growing and growing as more people joined up to contribute. And as popular as we are for our tone now, back in the early days, whee-OOOH, there were some folk that HATED it, and were really out to get the site! But as our main talkpage still says, “THE FUNNY STAYS,” and eventually history got on our side. :)

To complete this recap of our history and answer the other big question that’s often asked - “why are there two wikis?” - we’ll jump ahead to 2008, when Wikia was in the process of redesigning itself to look less like Wikipedia, leading to the incorporation of an increasingly ridiculous number of ads. You’ve seen what Wikia (or “Fandom,” as they’re call now) looks like these days, right? This was the move toward that. The Transformers Wiki had no time for the talking auto-play adverts that were being shoved into their page layouts, forcing text and images off the screen, and as the Wikia administrators were not willing to compromise on the issue, it was decided that, in order to preserve itself, the site would go independent, moving to its own server, owned by Willis. That was when we were rechristened “TFWiki,” and where we remain today, while the previous Wikia wiki still exists in a largely-abandoned state.

5 Writing Tips for Roleplayers

I wrote this up on a blog of mine that’s currently inactive in response to a meme, and I felt like sharing it here, too! These are tips I keep in mind regularly and feel they really work for me, while I occasionally notice sometimes people haven’t quite grasped the concepts and may be interested in doing so. In no way is anyone roleplaying incorrectly, but these are just ways to make the experience perhaps more enjoyable for you and those you interact with!

1 Be aware of whether or not you’re actually giving your partner something to respond to. Upon finishing a para or multi-para reply, check if your reply has at least two of these three things: dialogue, action (aside from speaking), or imagery describing the scene or your character’s appearance. This should give your partner a substantial amount of material to base their reply off of. They can have their character speak back to yours, react to the action, or react to/build on the imagery! All three are great, but not always necessary. This tip also may not always apply depending on the kind of interaction you’re having, but in your typical para they will be what keeps the story moving. Note: Your character’s inner thoughts are a fourth element to add in a reply, and while it’s important and interesting to read, keep in mind that sometimes it’s not easy to base a response off of.

2 Another tip for giving your partner something to respond to when it comes to one-liners or dialogue in general is to avoid saying single statements pertaining to one idea. By this I mean something like, “That’s cool” or, “I wish I could do that.” Instead say something like, “That’s cool. Where did you learn to do that?” or, “I wish I could do that, but I don’t have anyone to teach me.” Adding a question of course never fails to give your partner something to respond to (and therefore can even be written by itself as it’s not a statement). Making a compound statement or more than one statement on a subject essentially gives people two things to work with, and responding to it will feel less restricting. For example: Instead of your partner saying “You never know until you try” to the simple statement (creating another boring statement), by adding to yours you could invite them to say something like, “You never know until you try. I could teach you!” Now there’s something you can easily respond back to!

3 If you’re anything like me and prefer replies to stay concise so that things move along more quickly, avoid multiple lines of dialogue pertaining to many different ideas and avoid having more than one goal to obtain through action. This is something that happens a lot, and even the most experienced roleplayers do it unintentionally. I am still guilty of it myself. We all go a little overboard sometimes, and you will notice that once someone goes overboard the replies have a tendency to keep expanding. Even if more is happening at once, the story tends to drag. This can be a problem because it’s one of the main reasons we will get bored of a thread, or feel too overwhelmed by it, or both. Try to restrain yourself by finishing the reply after you have responded to the one or two things your partner has given you. Instead of focusing on matching word count, focus on matching ideas. Feel like it’s still not enough? Throw in some imagery or insight to your character’s thoughts.

4 When writing a starter for an interaction with a character yours has yet to interact with, this should be a given, but read everything the mun has provided about that character. If it’s a canon character and particularly if it’s one you’re not as familiar with, go beyond that and look them up on a fandom wiki, just make sure to recognize where the character may be canon divergent if they’re supposed to be. As you do this, pick out ways this character may relate to your character. Do they have similar or conflicting interests? Are they from the same place or been to the same places? Is there something about them your character finds impressive or something that bothers them? Is your character’s personality one that might clash with theirs? Once you’ve got answers to any of these questions, have your starter comment on or insinuate something you’ve discovered. This gives something for your characters to discuss and jumpstarts the creation of a story to share, which is especially important if it’s their first meeting as those threads are always in danger of feeling redundant and flat from the start.

5 Find your character’s voice (a.k.a. their way of speaking). As you write their dialogue, ask yourself questions like these: Where/when did they grow up and how did people (of their social class) speak there? What kind of accent do they have? What slang do they use? Do they avoid using contractions? Do they use foul language and how often? Are they articulate with a wide vocabulary? Do they keep things short or are they prone to run-on sentences and long-windedness? Do they have a speech impediment? Are exclamations (!) common for them or do they speak more calmly? Do they address people with pet names/nicknames? And a bonus: If texting/typing applies to them, do they use correct grammar, capitalization, acronyms, emojis, etc? Finding your character’s voice is key if you really want to get to know them and it’s also one good way to be sure you’ve created a solid character. You may feel it comes naturally, but take note of it and make a conscious effort to keep it consistent. It also may evolve over time, but be aware of that, too!

anonymous asked:

This sounds weird but could you give some advice to other fanfiction writers? You're really good. 💕

oh my goooooooood where are all you lovely people coming from tonight?? 

alrighty, let’s give this a go!

Fanfic Tips:

Character Motivation

This is my biggest thing. You should always, at any given moment, know what every character in a scene wants. What they want is going to dictate how they act and react to things. Without characters wanting things, nobody ever does anything, and your fic doesn’t exist. 

When characters have different motivations and have to come together, magic happens. And as characters develop, their motivations change. 

Great example?

what Luke wants (general motivation: freedom -> The Right Thing): to get off his uncle’s farm and get to go be with his friends at the academy -> to be a Jedi and fight for the rebellion -> to learn more but also keep his friends safe -> to redeem his father.

what Leia wants (general motivation: fight Empire): to get the Death Star plans to the rebel base and find Obi-Wan Kenobi -> to not be in the Empire’s clutches -> to blow up the Death star -> to not be in the Empire’s clutches -> to save Han -> to blow up the other Death Star 

what Han wants (general motivation: self-preservation -> protect friends): to get his hands on some money so that he doesn’t get killed by a mob boss -> to escape the empire -> to help the rebellion/keep his friends safe

(Obi-Wan, meanwhile, pretty much just wants to keep Luke safe, and help the rebellion if he can.)

All different, all interweaving, most of them changing as the characters are influenced by others, and learn and grow. 

So yeah. You gotta know this shit about your characters - it’s crucial. 

Tip? If you’re unsure about whether you know what they want, try making a list of all the important characters in your fic (and then potentially do this with most scenes, briefly) and work out what their main motivation/what they want is. Just…in general. In life. And then, once you’re in a scene, see how this plays into what they want in this exact moment, and how they’re going to go about trying to get it. 

Know Your Source Material

You don’t have to be an expert in your fandom to write fanfic, but the more you know, the easier it is to move through the world and build a story, because you know where you’re going and how things work. Wikis are your friend, especially when working in big universes like DW or SW. (Like, hell, I might know a lot about DW, and feel very comfortable in that universe, but I still find myself on the TARDIS Index File all the time, checking little random things. It’s a damn godsend, and every fandom has a wiki.)

Your Characters Are Just People

Make sure you let your characters fuck up once in a while. They’re fallible beings, they’re going to make rash decisions that backfire, they’re going to try something and fail, they’re going to say the wrong thing and piss somebody off. They’re going to maybe mean well but fuck up majorly, and that’s okay, that’s good. Let them apologise, let them learn from the consequences, let the healing of a wound in a relationship bring the people closer together. 

And yes, this still goes for characters that almost never do anything wrong, or are all ‘holier than thou’. They are still gonna go about some things the wrong way. 

Planning Is Good, But Be Flexible 

In my experience, while some people lean heavily towards one or the other, appropriate use of planning or gardening can depend heavily on what kind of story you’re writing. 

When writing more action based storylines, I’ve found it’s very easy to get stuck in the middle of them - you get the characters into a mess and get stuck for a month not knowing how to get them out. This is where planning tends to be handy. A good way of not getting stuck is to plan it all out in little increments, so there’s not too much room to get stuck. Also, plotting from the back. Start at the end. Works really well a lot of the time. 

If planning works for you, plan as much as you want. But, always, always, be ready to change something, if you try a bit of gardening and end up somewhere different to where you expected to be. Always follow what feels right over sticking with a plan. 

Gardening aka Let The Characters Take The Lead

…this is fanfic. Let’s be honest, we know that most of it is juicy interpersonal stuff. So while planning is all well and good, I think gardening works a lot better. When writing the maths teacher fic, I went in pretty much blind. I had a couple of vague ideas of what I wanted to achieve, but I also wanted the relationship I was developing to be as absolutely genuine/believable as possible (which, according to the general consensus, it is). 

The way to do that?

Don’t try and force things between the characters. Sometimes you might start a scene with a particular moment in mind, and that’s all good, but for me personally, I’ve found that you tend to get results that are more organic by simply going into a scene blind and seeing what the characters do. You should still, hopefully, have an idea of what you want to happen, but the characters and their ways of reacting to things should always come first. 

Seriously, if you’ve got the characterisation down, they’ll do the hard work for you. 

Maybe they’ll get to where you wanted, maybe they won’t. But it’s actually a really fun ride, doing it this way. When are they going to kiss? When are they going to fuck? Who knows? Not me! How could I know, when I haven’t yet seen/created the unique and particular path of events that gets them to that point? 

Like, I went into a chapter once, intending for a child character to kill a guy. But when it came to writing the scene, I just wasn’t quite sure if she would actually do it, even with her evil psychopathic mother egging her on. So I gave the kid the reins/gun, and sat back to see what happened. She ended up shooting him non-fatally, only for him to be killed by the vaguely disappointed mother instead. I was like “oh, okay, cool, that works”. 

Garden. Have fun letting the characters surprise you!

Dialogue

Dialogue is the make or break of a story, really. And the trick to dialogue is to make it authentic, and give the characters their own unique voices. 

First one is simple. Make sure the dialogue sounds like how people actually talk. Anyone who has read any of my fics knows that I use “-” and “…” and “um” and “uh” liberally. That’s because humans, modern day ones at least, aren’t always the most eloquent of creatures. We mumble and say the wrong thing, or get distracted halfway through, or forget what we were going to say, and hesitate when we’re unsure (even posh, eloquent characters, they just do it less and use bigger words in between). Let the characters do this. 

Saying the dialogue out loud will help a lot. Also, you could also try verbally paraphrasing a conversation from the fic to a friend, and you’ll likely find some of the dialogue coming out a lot more casually/authentically. 

As for giving the characters their own unique voices, that’s just down to knowing your canon and being in tune with the characters, which is a crucial thing but unfortunately not something I can really give advice on, you’ve gotta get those in your head on your own. 

Details Matter

Different details matter in different stories. And getting them wrong can really break the immersion.

If you’re writing characters that come from a different place to you, make sure you know how people from that place talk! Americans, don’t you fucking dare have a British character call somebody ‘Mom’, it breaks the immersion completely and makes me want to punch something. It’s ‘Mum’, for anyone from UK/Aus/NZ. And same with Brits writing American characters, but the other way around. This goes for any UK/US/Aus/NZ/Canada language difference. Find out what your character calls things.

Working details out can seem unnecessary, or going over the top, but honestly, half the time you realise that you’ve gone and got something wrong, and next thing you know the entire plot has a gaping hole in it, or a character doesn’t know something they got told three months back, but you forgot about it. 

Like, okay, I have a day by day plan of the timeline of the maths teacher fic (and, going forward, its general universe), because I was trying to weave in all this original material through the show canon (and now, write several stories/oneshot set at the same time within that verse, focused on different characters/things), and if I hadn’t done that, I would have royally fucked myself over multiple times. 

I’m not saying everyone has to make a timeline that detailed, because for a lot of stories it wouldn’t be remotely necessary, but it was for this particular one. 

But just details in general. Do your research, check that thing on the wiki, get specific with details about a character, even if they’re just a minor one (though maybe stick to just one or two details, in this case). 

This kind of goes along with show, don’t tell. Like you could tell the readers blatantly that a character loves a thing, or you could talk about how they wearing clothing printed with the thing and have them jabbering on about it excitedly, you know? 

Don’t be afraid to ask for help if you need information!

Seek out people who are experts in something you need to know about. This might be kink (bless the friends I’ve made through fic in the last six months or so, who have helped me in this area), or something specific to their country’s society/culture/choice of words for a certain thing. 

Also, if you’re trying to add diversity in your fics, and you hopefully should be, ask friends or people on Tumblr from within the group you’re trying to include to get information! Want to write a trans guy? Go find a trans guy to talk to about it! (I did this with a demigirl character recently, and got about four or five really helpful people more than happy to give me the info I was looking for, they were really excited about the prospect of demigirl characters existing at all.) It’s really easy to add in background diversity regardless of what fandom you’re writing for, and it can make a lot of difference to any readers who find themselves unexpectedly represented, even if only in a minor or one time character. 

In Conclusion:

Know your characters, and what they want, and how they talk. Let them lead the story, because they’re why you’re here, and doing all this. Give them real and imperfect voices and qualities, and let them make mistakes and apologise.

And do your research, so you get the details right.

I hope this helped! Now, go forth and write!

(And have fun! That’s the other big rule. Do it out of love, make yourself laugh, just have fun with it!) 

so im still new to the fandom and i dont really have all the lingo down but im confused over the term “Seeker”

like its it just a term for a decepticon with jet alt form??? or just any bot with a jet form?? or any bot that can fly??? in that case why doesnt anyone call Cyclonus a “seeker” in fics??? is it cause he wasnt /really/ a decepticon??? or is he the wrong jet form??? or from a different city than where these “seekers” come from??? 

anonymous asked:

would you ever do something like headcanons of the pros and cons of dating a character? and if so would you do some for tsu and/or ochako? (and if not of course I understand haha) thank you !! 💖

I can give it a shot!! Tsuyu and Ochaco coming up!! It’s hard to find cons, though. They’re both so amazing.


Originally posted by bird-studio


Pros and Cons of Dating Tsu!

  • Pros:
    • Very huggable!! Her posture is perfect for hugging her from behind, front, side, or any angle really. It’s easy for her to rest her head on her s/o’s body, and she’s also kinda squishy, so it’s even better to hug her.
    • Her s/o can look at any frog anywhere and feel happy since they are dating a frog. This is also nice because the internet loves pictures of frogs and you can send Tsu any picture of a frog and she will get excited.
    • Texting her is effortless and fun. She’s the kind of person who says goodnight and then five minutes later sends a meme she found and the conversation starts back up again.
    • Tsu is very much loved by all her friends, so if her s/o treats her right, then her s/o gets tons of new people to love them as well. Being wrapped into the 1-A friendship wheel is exciting and fun (and also involves a group chat).
    • Very patient. No matter what she’s willing to sit back and wait.
    • Tsuyu Asui has one of the best smiles in the world, big and bright, and she is almost always smiling around her s/o.
  • Cons:
    • Holding hands is tricky business. Her quirk lets her stick to walls and other things, so her hands would be naturally somewhat sticky, at least if she’s not careful. Watch out for stuck hands.
    • Tsu doubts herself a lot, and while this isn’t a con, it’s almost a caution that her s/o has to watch out for those down swings. But, motivation and compliments go a long way with helping this.
    • Her friends can and will make sure that her s/o is a good person, which means a slight bit of incognito stalking while on dates. Watch out for kids in black hoodies and poor disguises.
    • Tsu can be pretty aloof to some emotional issues, and doesn’t take hints well. Her s/o needs to spend a lot of time coaching her on how to handle emotional distress and pick up on subtle things.


Originally posted by desu


Pros and Cons of Dating Ochaco!

  • Pros:
    • As determined as she is, Ochaco will motivate her s/o into doing whatever their dream is. Wanna be a pro-hero? She’s right there training and doing vision boards with her s/o. Wanna be an author? She’s there proof reading and giving what little suggestions she has. Ochaco is super helpful and super sweet about it, always pushing her s/o to go above and beyond.
    • Ochaco is very caring and understanding. If her s/o is going through a rough time, chances are she’s also been there herself and will help her s/o any way she can. She’s selfless that way.
    • Hanging out is always fun. She and her s/o might not go out to fancy places (or any that require admission fees), but oh man is she a blast anyway. Her energy makes anything feel like being at a carnival. There’s just something magical about her.
    • Will, I repeat, WILL play pranks. Ochaco just likes to laugh, and her s/o is an easy target. Worry not, this is a pro. The pranks are usually hilarious for all the people involved.
    • Stay at home dates, where the atmosphere and private and romantic, are preferred, and these dates open the doors for long and deep conversations.
  • Cons:
    • Ochaco is sweet, but she’s sweet to a fault, and often ignores her s/o or her friends in favor of helping others. This also causes her to become emotionally exhausted easily, which means she might not be the best person to be around if a sudden problem comes up if she’s been helping out the rest of the time.
    • She can be a little overbearing. While she wants to help and motivate, she gets a little too into it and sometimes takes on doing most of the work even when she shouldn’t.
    • Accidentally activates her quirk while kissing. S/o might be floating a little too high for a smooth landing before she notices. Watch out!

~Admin Kaz