family f

ff-sunset-oasis  asked:

Heyyyy Andrea so I'm just wondering what are your thoughts on Blaise Zabini's mom? Like, I'm always love how you occasionally slipped her into your stories with Blaise, usually just some passing mention but the descriptions always got me very intrigued - so just want to ask what's your thoughts/views about her? Thanks <3

HA HA it’s not like I’ve been waiting my entire life for someone to ask me about blaise zabini’s mother or anything that would be dumb that would be i ns a ne im fine let’s do this:

  • for nineteen years, her name is elizabeth.
  • lizzie, her father calls her, with the same sort of simple, incredulous affection he directs at her mother—her mother, the witch, who brews potions that smell like anise and cinnamon, who wrinkles her nose at the rolling green hills of the english countryside, who wears a gleaming silver scorpion pendant around her neck and tells elizabeth bedtime stories about hot desert nights and crumbling pyramids and brilliant, scheming queens who spilled blood and conquered continents and stole thrones—and all with small, secret smiles on their faces.
  • elizabeth isn’t lizzie.
  • elizabeth goes to hogwarts; lizzie does not.
  • elizabeth is sorted into slytherin; lizzie is not.
  • elizabeth slinks through the halls, learns how to listen and how to lie and how to levitate a peacock feather; lizzie does not. elizabeth collects lipsticks she’s too young for, slick crimsons and glossy violets, highlights the arches of her cheekbones with burnished bronze powder and lines her eyes in liquid, velvety black; lizzie does not. elizabeth speaks and says nothing, lowers her gaze and sees everything, enchants as effortlessly as she entraps; lizzie does not.
  • instead, lizzie goes home for the summer, braids her hair into two neat plaits and picks wildflowers with her father, laughs pretty and easy and loud, loud like she can’t when she’s at school, because the dungeons have high ceilings and long memories and an alarming tendency to produce variables she knows she can’t control; not like elizabeth can.
  • elizabeth doesn’t make mistakes.  
  • lizzie does.
  • lizzie is eighteen and punching her time card at the ministry and dreaming about palm trees swaying in a heavy summer breeze, about pillows of sand slipping through her fingertips, about crystal blue skies and sheer linen dresses and skin tanned a dark, silky brown by the heat of the sun.  
  • and she meets a boy. a man. a visiting diplomat with a lilting accent and a fan of laugh lines around his eyes and a luxuriously appointed suite at the savoy that starts to feel like home—too much, too soon.  
  • “you’re beautiful,” he tells her, and it’s elizabeth whose mouth curves up slyly, invitingly, as she replies, “i know.”
  • “you’re perfect,” he tells her, and it’s lizzie whose heart races, whose breath skips, whose lips tremble as she replies, “i know.”
  • “i love you,” he tells her, and she doesn’t know where elizabeth stops and lizzie begins when she replies, “i love you, too.”
  • and he buys her extravagant gifts and he makes her extravagant promises and then he unceremoniously leaves; goes back to italy—to his wife, to his children, to his peach-pink villa on the mediterranean coast with the sweeping balconies and the sparkling turquoise swimming pool—the day before she realizes she’s pregnant.  
  • the ensuing rage—it’s quiet, really, a low, sad, gentle simmer deep in the pit of her stomach that could rock her to complacency if she let it.  
  • she doesn’t let it.
  • instead, she considers her options. she sends a letter. she opens her own gringott’s vault. she calmly answers, “morning sickness,” when her nosiest coworker asks why she’s been late all week. she sends another letter. she moves into a nicer flat, the kind with a doorman and a concierge and a lot of wealthy neighbors. she develops a strange craving for candied dates. she bides her time.
  • elizabeth calls it justice; lizzie calls it blackmail.
  • the day after she discovers she’s having a boy, she sends one last letter, dusts the slow-drying ink with a gold-tinged powder that smells like anise and cinnamon, and she thinks about hazy, blistering sunsets shimmering red and yellow and orange, about wide-open limestone palaces and gods that expect you to start wars for them and buttery leather sandals caked brown with old blood.  
  • elizabeth calls it justice; lizzie calls it revenge.
  • five months later, she’s gritting her teeth and squeezing the midwife’s hand and desperately wondering if the pain will ever end.  
  • it does.
  • and then she’s staring down at a baby—hers, hers—and he’s impossibly tiny and impossibly warm and impossibly helpless. his mouth relaxes into a pout, and his eyes slit open, glassy and unfocused and so dark they might as well be colorless.  
  • she names him blaise.
  • she names him blaise because blaise is a name that can’t be cut in half, and she watches him sleep while the midwife lectures her about feedings and nappies and the bare spot on her finger where a wedding ring should be. there’s a tightness in elizabeth’s chest, fierce and fearful, both, that does nothing but multiply the longer she looks at him, her son, and she understands—suddenly, and with a perfect stab of clarity—why her father had wanted her to be lizzie.
  • no one has ever hurt her twice.
  • no one will ever hurt him at all.

Criminally Underrated Cartoons I Strongly Recommend 

Clone High

description: Clones of historical figures attend high school together. A parody of teen drama’s, Clone High hits every trope and cliche and parodies them mercilessly. The comedy comes in both zany physical gags and dialogue dripping in self awareness. Every plot is a cliche taken up to eleven, hence surpassing the cliche and becoming something else entirely. The jokes range from intelligent to low-brow to absurd. I’m trying to recall an early Teletoon promo and I believe it went something like; “it’s about a girl who’s in love with a guy who’s in love with a girl who’s in love with a guy who hates the guy that loves to party.” Every character is broad, but it’s that type of show. 

strengths: Writing. This is one of those shows written for writers. Also, the voice acting. The cast is great and the line reads themselves can get really funny. 

weaknesses: The stylized art style may turn some people off. Also, if you hate love triangles to the point where you can’t even see them deconstructed and satirized, well…

where to watch: YouTube, DVD, Kisscartoon

F is for Family

description: This show follows the everyday lives of the Murphy’s, a lower middle class family living in the early 70′s. Frank is a Korean war veteran who gave up his dream of becoming an airline pilot to raise his son and quickly marry his girlfriend due to her unplanned pregnancy. The show is far more subtle compared to it’s predecessors such as the Simpsons or American Dad.  It’s more comparable to early seasons of Rosanne or Married With Children, in that it is the subversion of the family sitcom (or animated family sitcom in this case). The show has a slow, more realistic pace focusing on everyday aspects of life. Heavily character and relationship based. But don’t get the impression this show is quite. The arguments, for example are highly volatile and realistic. 

strengths: Writing, character, dialogue based humour, subtle but unpredictable stories.

weaknesses: The art style and animation are rather average and I find that gives people an inaccurate impression of what this show is going to be. Believe me, the writing far makes up for that. 

where to watch: Netflix, Kisscartoon

Duckman

description: Duckman: Private Dick/Family Man follows Eric Duckman, a put upon private investigator and recently widowed husband and father. Along with his dry-witted and multi-talented partner Cornfed they solve… Well, Cornfed solves them anyways. This relic of the early nineties is often described as “ahead of it’s time”, although I find it to be very much a product of it’s time with perhaps a little more freedom than the average network show. This description likely has to do with the fact that many of the issues satirized in Duckman are still relevant, if not more so, today. Duckman is a fast-paced, action/comedy/family bastardization of a sitcom. 

strengths: Writing, big time, in terms of humour and character. Duckman’s personality leaps off the screen and the comedy is quirky and strange enough to not feel stale, even after such a long time. I personally find the stylized art and fluid animation to be a large strength as well.

weaknesses: Some may find Duckman too reprehensible to sympathize with. The semi-regular pop culture references are also rather dated (though some may find this charming). Finally, the female characters, while well-written, tend to be under used.

where you can watch: YouTube, DVD, Shomi

Moral Orel

description: A stop-motion deconstruction of small town Christian America. The series follows Orel Puppington on his quest to be a good christian. Basically, the show plays on the idea of the towns populace seeming perfect at first glance, but slowly (or sometimes not so slowly) we see the facade slip. Season 1 mainly follows a simple episodic formula with very broad humour typical of Adult Swim (at least at the time). Season 2 is where the more realistic tone and character based plot sets in, season 1 sets it up however. By season 3 many consider the show “too good to succeed”.

strengths: Character, character, character! Character development is by far it’s biggest strength. The show also has a very cute art style which is not only visually appealing, but perfectly contrasts with dark subtexts. 

weaknesses: Season one’s humour may not be everyones cup of tea (though personally, I enjoy it). On the opposite of the spectrum, season 3 can get quite depressing. To the point where, although I enjoy the artistic value of the episodes, some can leave me emotionally drained due to the overall nihilism and bleakness of the world it creates.

where you can watch: DVD (season 1 and part of season 2 only), Kisscartoon

Venture Brothers

description: This action/adventure/sci-fi/comedy show started as a send-up Johnny Quest type shows of the 60′s and 70′s, though by the second season it really became less of a parody and more of an entry into the genre itself, only with copious effort and talent actually put into it. If you like character development, stories that unfold sporadically throughout seasons, weird unexpected characters being killed off and dialogue based humour this is the show for you. Venture Brothers is the type of show you have to watch a few times to get everything out of an episode. Rarely is anything spelled out to the audience, this is a show that loves subtext and referencing previous events without reminding you of it beforehand. 

strengths: Writing, character development, animation, continuity, character driven.

weaknesses: I honestly don’t know if I can list any. I guess season one is a little hokey, but I still like it. Though, the first few episodes don’t do a great job drawing the viewer in and I find most first time viewers don’t really start to enjoy the show until “Mid-Life Chrysalis” or “Eeny Meeny Miney Magic”. Also, don’t start with the pilot. It’s non-canon and it’ll probably just confuse you.

where you can watch: DVD, Kisscartoon, AdultSwim.com (when it’s airing, not sure if they host it inbetween because I can only access AS.ca here in Canada)

Alfred: Easter egg hunt!! Woo!!

*Alfred and Matthew both run around looking for Easter Eggs. They find nothing,*

Matthew:… you guys did actually get Easter Eggs right?

Arthur *Sipping Tea*: Of course. 

Alfred: Where… are they?

Francis: We hid them. That is the point.

Matthew:… but… 

Arthur: Good luck. 

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