family counselors

a list of the things i never told you:
i. when we first started talking, we were only 14, i never thought i’d fall in love with you. i just wanted to be friends but something about you gave me butterflies and made my heart skip a beat.
ii. though we are no longer together or on speaking terms, i don’t regret talking to you or being with you. i’m thankful for all the laughs and tears and fights and memories. i’m happy i got the privilege to fall in love with you.
iii. throughout the 3+ years we were in each other’s lives, i felt like a secret. i always felt like i wasn’t enough and that our relationship was a joke…that because we weren’t physically together, our relationship wasn’t real.
iv. it was so fucking real to me.
v. i told everyone about you. i told my parents, my friends, my family, my counselor. you were everything to me and you couldn’t even tell your mom about me. the only reason she knew about me was because your friend accidentally said something about me in front of her. i never told you how much that hurt.
vi. i still think about you everyday.
vii. i wish i didn’t.
viii. when we were together, for the very last time, i thought that was it, that you were the absolute one for me, i was so ready to be with you, i was so ready to fall more helplessly in love with you than i already was, i was ready to risk everything to be with you…it never felt mutual.
ix. i always wonder what it would have been like if we lived in the same state, the same city…if things would have been easier or harder.
x. i questioned if you loved me or not way too often.
xi. the whole time we were together, i only vocalized what you did wrong or what you weren’t doing, i always failed to mention everything you did right. i am so sorry for that.
xii. i got to witness you grow and change as a person and go through phases and watch you fall in love with other people and make memories but i only got to witness your life through pictures and a phone screen and it was so painful for me.
xiii. BUT through that phone screen i got to hear your voice and watch your nose crinkle when you giggled and see you cry and you were always so beautiful.
xiv. in all honesty, i still wish today that i could have met you, to physically see the person i’ve immersed myself in for so long.
xv. i’m happy without you.
xvi. i’m not happy without you.
xvii. my mom still asks about you, she seriously doesn’t hate you.
xviii. i hate us for not being strong enough to keep fighting. but i’m proud of us. i am proud we made it as far as we did. and i am proud that, separately we have the strength not to go back.
xix. i get genuinely mad seeing other couples (you know who) together because we deserved that, it should’ve been us…but it isn’t and i guess that means something.
xx. you’re the hardest fucking person to let go of, i swear to god.
xxi. i never reminded you enough of how much you meant to me and how truly amazing you were. i quite often took you for granted. i’m sorry i did that. i’m sorry for absolutely everything that i did…or didn’t do.
xxii. i wish you the best in life. i hope you pursue a career in photography or early childhood education or whatever your heart desires now. i hope you get that little farm house and fill it with cute animals and have horses. i hope you accomplish all of your dreams & genuinely live life as happy as can be. you have been through so much and you deserve to not be in hell anymore. and as much as it burns my heart, i hope you find someone that can love you so much better than i ever did.
Cool for the Summer (Wednesday Addams!Castiel part 4)

Or: Cas and Dean go to Summer Camp!

Big thanks to interncastiel for not only the original story prompt  but for being an endless source of ideas, art, inspiration and just letting me bug her with questions

also, check out the blog devoted to Wednesday Addams!Castiel

Dean reclines across the large Persian rug spread out over the grass, fingers brushing over the silken strands. His eyes focus on the empty space above as the twilight sky fades from blue into a deep black. The soft murmur of voices surrounds him as does the immediate sound of pages turning. Castiel sits beside him, quietly reading a book of poetry by the light of a the candelabra perched next to him, the flame casting flickering shadows over both of them.

“You know, Cas,” Dean starts, “when you said your family was having a Memorial Day picnic, this wasn’t what I expected.”

“How do you mean?” Cas asks, not lifting his eyes from him book.

“Well, I didn’t expect it to be at night,” Dean says.

“My family has something of an aversion to direct sunlight, Dean,” Castiel replies, the “obviously” left unsaid. Dean chuckles and pushes himself up to rest on his elbows.

“Yeah, I know,” He says, glancing toward the members of Cas’ immense extended family milling around them. “I still think a cemetery is kind of a strange place to hold a picnic, though.“ Castiel looks up, raising an eyebrow in Dean’s direction and closing his book.

“Why? I can’t think of a better location to memorialize lost relatives.” Dean opens his mouth to respond but shuts it immediately. Castiel does have something of a point. “Are you enjoying yourself, though?”  Dean smiles and sits up fully, leaning forward and placing a soft kiss on Cas’ mouth.

“Yeah, I am,” he says against his lips. A shrill, bubbling laugh cuts through the air. Cas and Dean both turn to see a woman with fiery red hair talking very animatedly with Cas’ parents and Uncle.

“Who’s that?” Dean asks. He may not know all of Cas’ family, but he would have remembered this woman. With her hair and elegant, light gray party dress, she stands out like a sore thumb in the sea of black clothing.

“Abaddon,” Castiel answers coolly. “Uncle Crowley’s latest companion.” Dean frowns, noticing the way her fingers trail up and down Crowley’s arm while his hand rests solidly on the small of her back. She smiles wide, but something about it seems sinister. Maybe it’s the deep red lipstick giving her a clown-like appearance.

Gabriel darts across the lawn past them, chasing a small, giggling boy in a red and white romper.

“Samandriel,” Cas calls out, beckoning the child to him. Samandriel’s eyes light up when he notices Cas and he hurries over in his direction

"Well, hey there little man,” Dean says as the toddler flops down onto Castiel’s lap. “Where did you come from.”

“Samandriel is staying with us for the summer,” Castiel explains, plucking the voodoo doll from his chubby fingers and shaking it in front of the boy. “Colette and Cain are on a Himalayan expedition and requested we mind him. Apparently the guides thought it would be ‘deadly’ to bring him along.” Castiel makes air quotes and  rolls his eyes at the idea. Dean nods, hunkering down to get on eye level with the boy.

“Hmm, not sure you really look like a Samandriel,” Dean says playfully. “I think I’m going to call you… Alfie!” Samandriel erupts in a fit of giggles as Dean repeats the name over and over again. Castiel shakes but Dean catches a curl at the edge of Cas’ mouth, the beginnings of a smile.,

“Would you like to sing our song, Samandriel.” Cas offers, pulling the boy to his feet. He bounces in excitement as Cas begins to sing. “Ricin, Hemlock, Cyanide, Arsenic and Aconite…” Samandriel claps along with the song, which Dean recognizes as “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star.”

Read on AO3

Picture this: Luna Lovegood as a camp counselor.

Luna Lovegood teaching kids to appreciate the wonders of the world.

Luna Lovegood encouraging creativity in every activity.

Luna Lovegood creating a family with her co-counselors.

Luna Lovegood going way overboard for every spirit day and color war.

Luna Lovegood sitting off the dock with that one homesick camper and taking her mind off of all their troubles.

Luna Lovegood understanding that these kids might have hell going on in their personal lives and understanding that.

Luna Lovegood filling the camp with acceptance and wonder.

Luna Lovegood supporting her campers in anyway that she can.

Luna Lovegood as a camp counselor.

Ilvermorny houses as career options:

Wampus: military, martial arts instructor, yogi, professional sports player, animal shelter director, coach, lifeguard, FBI, police officer, fireman, park ranger, EMT

Thunderbird: tour guide, traveling photographer, zip-line/white water rafting/anything wild and adventurous instructor, traveling nurse, air pilot, UPS carrier, actor, librarian, adventurer author, cartographer, journalist for National Geographic

Pukwudgie: doctor or nurse, teacher of all ages, botanist, gardener/farmer, pharmacist, chef, bakery owner, mother or father, guidance counselor, family resources employee, talk show host, EMT

Horned Serpent: professor, scientist, chemical engineer, author, librarian, psycologist or psychiatrist, historian, spiritual leader, biologist, veterinarian, zoologist, journalist

Loving Woo Jiho (Part Nine)

Part 1: x, Part 2:  x, Part 3: x, Part 4: x, Part 5: x, Part 6: x, Part 7: x, Part 8: x

-Admin Kitty

Loving him was never a good idea but then again, it was never a choice either

When Ji had left, Youngbae had eventually dragged you to counselling sessions. 

Mostly, your memories of those sessions were a blur of plastic chairs scraping across the floor and a lot of words like “a hard time” and a “difficult situation” were flung around. 

Some things said stuck in your thoughts more though.

“Don’t you think he would want you to be happy?" 

Six months into Jiho’s disappearance, it was something you’d heard a million times, from friends, family, counselors - everyone. But the thing was: you didn’t know.

You didn’t know what he wanted.

You didn’t know what this new Jiho who left his friends without a word would want.

Because if someone had asked you six months before hand if Jiho would ever run away, you would have called them crazy.

Keep reading

How Do I Know to When to Come Out ?

Even if you are comfortable announcing your sexual orientation or gender identity, deciding when and how to come out can be tough. The most important thing to do is to make sure that you will be safe. Knowing that you have someone to support you can also make a huge difference in your experience.

When and how to come out is a big concern for LGBT teens. Though TV shows and movies may make it seem as if people come out in one big dramatic announcement, maybe made over the school’s PA system, Tweeted about, or posted on Facebook, or Instagram, for most people coming out is more of a process.

Here are some questions to ask yourself:

  • Do you want to tell people individually or in a group?
  • Who do you want to tell; close friends, someone who you know is LGBT, family, a counselor? Have you thought about the risks or benefits to each?
  • Do you have support and is there one person who you are confident will react positively when you come out?
  • Are you prepared to deal with a possible negative reaction? Do you know who to turn to if this happens?
  • Have you considered what you will do if your parents stop supporting you financially after you come out?
  • Do you want to come out when there is a specific reason,like you are dating someone or want to go to gay pride?
  • Do you want to come out before you have a specific reason, so that no one will be surprised that you want to go to the gay prom or hang out at the GLBT Community Center?

Here are a few tips:

  • Pick a time when you, or the person you are coming out to, won’t be distracted or tired.
  • Don’t come out in the middle of a fight, or an already tense conversation.
  • Some teens find that having a conversation in a public place is a good idea because people are more likely to keep their emotions in check publicly.
  • If you are concerned about your parents’ reaction, consider coming out to a supportive relative, or other adult, first. Ask that person if he or she would be there when you come out to mom and dad.

The End Result

Though you probably have an idea of how people in your life will react, there are no guarantees. So the more you think about how you will come out, the better prepared you can be.

Don’t ever feel pressured to come out before you are ready. The most important thing is to make sure that you will be safe and supported.

Good luck!

Shit like this is why people don’t respect traditional marital arts anymore. Jeff Monson, the fighter on the left, is a former family counselor, political activist, BJJ black belt as well as an accomplished fighter.  I can’t believe how judgmental and disrespectful some traditional martial artists are when it comes to MMA.  At what belt level did your sensei drive home the importance of judging others? It’s hilarious that they pick Monson of all people, he is literally one of THE best at what probably is the single most effective martial art in one on one unarmed combat…As someone who started his MA practice at a close-minded karate McDojo, this is very representative of watered-down western TMA doublespeak.“Respect everyone” (Unless they are a prizefighter or member of another school)“Be loyal and obedient” (Fall over when I tell you to and keep paying the monthly fee or I will ask the rest of your friends at the dojo to alienate you)Be TENACIOUS (when? doing katas and point-sparring?!)Respect and learn from other martials arts (unless they are not on my short list of approved martial arts, then I’ll spend all my time trashing then and occasionally giving inaccurate demonstrations of how to defend against their “best techniques”)

vimeo

Tallie: Peer Counselor

Created by Laura Sreebny

Part of Nickelodeon Animated Shorts Program

Nickelodeon/PUNY, 2012

How Do I Know When to Come Out?

Even if you are comfortable announcing your sexual orientation or gender identity, deciding when and how to come out can be tough. The most important thing to do is to make sure that you will be safe. Knowing that you have someone to support you can also make a huge difference in your experience.

When and how to come out is a big concern for LGBT teens. Though TV shows and movies may make it seem as if people come out in one big dramatic announcement, maybe made over the school’s PA system, Tweeted about, or posted on Facebook, or Instagram, for most people coming out is more of a process.

Here are some questions to ask yourself:

  • Do you want to tell people individually or in a group?
  • Who do you want to tell; close friends, someone who you know is LGBT, family, a counselor? Have you thought about the risks or benefits to each?
  • Do you have support and is there one person who you are confident will react positively when you come out?
  • Are you prepared to deal with a possible negative reaction? Do you know who to turn to if this happens?
  • Have you considered what you will do if your parents stop supporting you financially after you come out?
  • Do you want to come out when there is a specific reason,like you are dating someone or want to go to gay pride?
  • Do you want to come out before you have a specific reason, so that no one will be surprised that you want to go to the gay prom or hang out at the GLBT Community Center?

Here are a few tips:

  • Pick a time when you, or the person you are coming out to, won’t be distracted or tired.
  • Don’t come out in the middle of a fight, or an already tense conversation.
  • Some teens find that having a conversation in a public place is a good idea because people are more likely to keep their emotions in check publicly.
  • If you are concerned about your parents’ reaction, consider coming out to a supportive relative, or other adult, first. Ask that person if he or she would be there when you come out to mom and dad.

The End Result

Though you probably have an idea of how people in your life will react, there are no guarantees. So the more you think about how you will come out, the better prepared you can be.

Don’t ever feel pressured to come out before you are ready. The most important thing is to make sure that you will be safe and supported.

Good luck!

Nursing is my humility, before this job my pride was fully intact.  But, I realize my place in the world as the sobbing sister of my 27 year old patient cries in my arms as the doctor’s words: “There was nothing we could do,” hang in the air. It is not glamorous or attractive; media and TV do not do us justice. I do not do it for the ‘thank yous,’ if that were the case I would have quit a long time ago. Some days, I play many roles not specified in my job description: housekeeper, family counselor, water fetcher, time coordinator.  If it is what my patient needs, regardless of the task, it becomes my job. That’s what nursing is. The 'buck’ ends here. Sometimes, I am so sick of it; my eyes roll when my back is to the patient and my annoyed sighs are the sound effect my coworkers hear.  I try to keep that attitude away, but it happens to everyone, nurses far better than me.  It’s not fun to clean up stool, or being chewed out by a cranky surgeon, or micromanaged by a family that does not have a clue. But, it’s what we do, it’s our normal. The funny thing is, while an outsider cannot imagine why a person would put him or herself through such a stressful career, we can’t imagine doing anything else.

The weird thing is how people who aren’t in sex work try to separate the guys I deal with from “real” people.

Like people always refer to my subs as “those freaks” or “weirdos.” They try to tell me that “normal” people aren’t like this. And I’m just like, these are the people that you think are normal. 

They are lawyers, realtors, construction workers, teachers and professors, club and business owners, college students (unfortunately lmao), guys that do graphic design for the websites you visit, fix electronics, photographers taking your family portraits, counselors, etc.

They are regular “normal” people that you see and deal with on a daily basis.