fairy tales from hans christian andersen

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Here’s my full story from the Valor Anthology! Thank you all for supporting the Kickstarter in 2014 and the book last summer, as well as sharing stuff on tumblr. I learned so much from this project and had such a great experience working with all the great people in the book that I’m looking forward to sharing more comics this year :) 

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Gerda and the Robber girl from Snow Queen. Resurfacing again to post this. It was inspired by a dear, dear friend. This was my first femslash ship ever, when I was a smol child, I used to read Andersen’s tale and watch the ye olde Soviet cartoon and I just wanted Gerda to stay with the Robber girl and quit searching for Kai, he was a  bit of a dick to her anyway.

23.07.16 Its been two days too long since I uploaded a picture but because it’s the summer holidays I’m not doing any proper studying! This is a sneak peek to the stationery haul I’m doing next week! Coming up is a driving test masterpost as well! My mum and I have been cutting back some bushes at the front of my house and I want to put them in my flower press. Also, I bought this books of Hans Christian Anderson’s fairy tales from a charity shop and it has “Christmas 1953” written on the inside.

Fairy tales from Hans Christian Andersen.(1805-1875).
First published in this edition 1899 (September).
Published London : Dent.

“The Mermaid”

Illustrator : Charles Robinson.(1870-1937).

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“I had been obsessed with the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale, ‘The Little Mermaid’, ever since I was a kid. And I fantasized about being one myself; I tied my feet together in the pool and practiced swimming like that from a very early age. The best thing about Splash’s success was little kid’s loving it. To this day, when they come up to me, they’re like, “Madison!” I’ve met hundreds of kids named Madison, and they all want to go swimming with me. I love that.” - Daryl Hannah

nytimes.com
Fairy Tales, Gently Fractured
Audiobooks of Garth Nix’s “Frogkisser!” and Chris Colfer’s “The Treasury of Classic Fairy Tales” offer kids spit-shined versions of Grimm Brothers’ classics.
By A.j. Jacobs

THE LAND OF STORIES
A Treasury of Classic Fairy Tales
Written and read by Chris Colfer
4½ hours. Hachette Audio.
(Middle grade; ages 8 to 12)

“Frogkisser!” comes several years after the actor Chris Colfer started to publish his own fairy-tale-inspired books with a girl-power twist. Colfer’s series the Land of Stories follows a pair of 12-year-old twins who are magically sucked into a book of fairy tales. (My kids and I are on Vol. 3 of six of the hardcovers.) In Colfer’s books, damsels are rarely in distress. Goldilocks, for instance, is a sword-wielding warrior and Sleeping Beauty hasn’t slept in years because she’s working tirelessly to reform her kingdom.

Colfer’s new audiobook, “The Land of Stories: A Treasury of Classic Fairy Tales,” is related to the series, but also a departure. It doesn’t feature the adventuring twins, but instead is a straightforward collection of fairy tales. Twenty-five stories from the Grimm brothers, Hans Christian Andersen and others, are retold and tidied up a bit by Colfer.

I recommend it for three reasons. First, Colfer — an actor most famous for playing a countertenor teenager on “Glee” — is a wizard at voices. In “Henny Penny,” he gives distinct, birdlike cadences to a duck, a goose, hen, rooster and a turkey. His yawn from Goldilocks was convincing enough to make me yawn in the driver’s seat.

Second, I want my sons to know the original fairy tales, and not just get them filtered through reinterpretations. We live in a world where kids ingest the parodies before the real thing. My children have seen multiple “Twilight Zone” takeoffs (on “Futurama,” for instance), but have never watched an episode of Rod Serling’s show. I suffer from this too. I knew the Puss in Boots character from “Shrek,” but embarrassingly had no notion of the original tale. (Which contains another useful moral: Blatant lies and fraud are the key to success.)

Which brings me to my third reason, which is that fairy tales are great conversation starters. Not so much for the lessons they are trying to impart, which are often appalling, but as a way to spark interesting questions. When listening in the car, my kids and I talked about whether Jack is morally justified in stealing gold from the giant just because the giant is a terrible being. Also, does the maiden in “Rumpelstiltskin” owe nothing to the dwarf for his hard work? Perhaps not her firstborn, but at least a token?

As I mentioned, Colfer has cleaned up the tales a bit. In terms of rawness, they fall somewhere between the Grimm and Disney versions. For instance, in the Grimm version, Cinderella’s stepsisters chop off a toe and a slice of heel to fit in the slipper. Disney’s “Cinderella” has no gore at all. Colfer’s compromise: The stepsister “crammed her foot inside the slipper so tightly it started to bleed.”

Colfer has also, thankfully, left out the truly horrible Grimm stories, like their tale “The Jew in the Thorns,” about a miserly man who is sentenced to death. Not even Disney could make that palatable.

But even when softened and redacted, listening to fairy tales can be demented, disturbing fun.

nytimes.com
Fairy Tales, Gently Fractured
Audiobooks of Garth Nix’s “Frogkisser!” and Chris Colfer’s “The Treasury of Classic Fairy Tales” offer kids spit-shined versions of Grimm Brothers’ classics.
By A.j. Jacobs

You don’t have to own a knitted pink cap or the collected works of Roxane Gay to find the sexual politics of fairy tales troubling. Among the lessons fairy tales impart:

Upward mobility is possible — if you’re a ravishing beauty (“Cinderella”). Women don’t need to talk — or breathe, really — as long as they are physically attractive (“Snow White”). Abducting women is a viable path to romance (“Beauty and the Beast”). The nonconsensual kissing of coma victims is a great way to meet your mate (“Sleeping Beauty”).

Pretty retrograde, even in the post-Hillary era. Which is why recent retellings and mash-ups of fairy tales tend to give the Grimm brothers universe a feminist makeover, or at least a feminist sheen.

[…] “Frogkisser!” comes several years after the actor Chris Colfer started to publish his own fairy-tale-inspired books with a girl-power twist. Colfer’s series the Land of Stories follows a pair of 12-year-old twins who are magically sucked into a book of fairy tales. (My kids and I are on Vol. 3 of six of the hardcovers.) In Colfer’s books, damsels are rarely in distress. Goldilocks, for instance, is a sword-wielding warrior and Sleeping Beauty hasn’t slept in years because she’s working tirelessly to reform her kingdom.

Colfer’s new audiobook, “The Land of Stories: A Treasury of Classic Fairy Tales,” is related to the series, but also a departure. It doesn’t feature the adventuring twins, but instead is a straightforward collection of fairy tales. Twenty-five stories from the Grimm brothers, Hans Christian Andersen and others, are retold and tidied up a bit by Colfer.

I recommend it for three reasons. First, Colfer — an actor most famous for playing a countertenor teenager on “Glee” — is a wizard at voices. In “Henny Penny,” he gives distinct, birdlike cadences to a duck, a goose, hen, rooster and a turkey. His yawn from Goldilocks was convincing enough to make me yawn in the driver’s seat.

Keep reading

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fairytale meme ☆ (5/10)
↳ the little mermaid

“Fascinated with the land above her head, mermaid Ariel- youngest daughter of King Triton- watches from the waves as the human prince Eric celebrates his birthday aboard a ship. When a storm capsizes the boat and throws him overboard, she rescues him, leaving him with naught but a memory of her singing before returning to the depths. so desperate to see him once again though, she trades her voice to the sea witch Ursula for legs, and goes ashore to find her true love.”

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croatian history meme: ½ women

                                          The Slavic Tolkien

Within her native land, as well as internationally, she has been praised as the best Croatian writer for children.
She started writing poetry, diaries and essays rather early but her works were not published until the beginning of the 20th century.
Her book Croatian Tales of Long Ago (Priče iz davnine), published in 1916, is among the most popular today.In the book Mažuranić created a series of new fairy-tales, but using names and motifs from the Slavic mythology of Croats. It was this that earned her comparisons to Hans Christian Andersen and Tolkien who also wrote completely new stories but based in some elements of real mythology.
Brlić-Mažuranić was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature four times. However, she never won the prize due to the fact that, in her time, the prize was not accustomed to be given to women.

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OPERAS I’VE SEEN: Antonín Dvořák, Rusalka  

Rusalka is an opera by Antonín Dvořák. The Czech libretto was written by the poet Jaroslav Kvapil (1868–1950) based on the fairy tales of Karel Jaromír Erben and Božena Němcová. Rusalka is one of the most successful Czech operas, and represents a cornerstone of the repertoire of Czech opera houses. A Rusalka is a water sprite from Slavic mythology, usually inhabiting a lake or river. It is the ninth opera Dvořák composed.

For many years unfamiliarity with Dvořák’s operas outside Czechoslovakia helped reinforce a perception that composition of operas was a marginal activity, and that despite the beauty of its melodies and orchestral timbres Rusalka was not a central part of his output or of international lyric theatre. In recent years it has been performed more regularly by major opera companies. 

The most popular excerpt from Rusalka is the “Song to the Moon” from act 1 which is often performed in concert and recorded separately. It has also been arranged for violin and used on film sound tracks.

The plot contains elements which also appear in The Little Mermaid by Hans Christian Andersen and in Undine by Friedrich de la Motte Fouqué, and has been described as a “sad, modern fairy tale”, in a similar vein to his previous play, Princessa Pampeliška. The libretto was completed by 1899, when Kvapil began looking for composers interested in setting his text. His composer friends were engaged with other works, but mentioned that Dvořák was looking for a project. The composer, always interested in Erben’s stories, read the libretto and composed his opera quite rapidly, with the first draft begun on 22 April 1900 and completed by the end of November. Coming after his four symphonic poems inspired by the folk-ballads of Erben of 1896–97, Rusalka may be viewed as the culmination of Dvořák’s exploration of a “wide variety of drama-creating musical techniques.” His music is generally through-composed, and uses motifs for Rusalka, her damnation, the water sprite and the forest. His word-setting is expressive while allowing for nationally inflected passages, and Grove judges the work shows the composer at the height of his maturity. He uses established theatrical devices – dance sections, comedy (Gamekeeper and Turnspit) and pictorial musical depiction of nature (forest and lake). 

nytimes.com
Fairy Tales, Gently Fractured
Audiobooks of Garth Nix’s “Frogkisser!” and Chris Colfer’s “The Treasury of Classic Fairy Tales” offer kids spit-shined versions of Grimm Brothers’ classics.
By A.j. Jacobs

New York Times Book Review 

The Land Of Stories; A Treasury Of Classic Fairy Tales 

(Audiobook)

“Frogkisser!” comes several years after the actor Chris Colfer started to publish his own fairy­ tale ­inspired books with a girl power twist. Colfer’s series the Land of Stories follows a pair of 12 ­year ­old twins who are magically sucked into a book of fairy tales. (My kids and I are on Vol. 3 of six of the hardcovers.) In Colfer’s books, damsels are rarely in distress. Goldilocks, for instance, is a swordwielding warrior and Sleeping Beauty hasn’t slept in years because she’s working tirelessly to reform her kingdom. 

Colfer’s new audiobook, “The Land of Stories: A Treasury of Classic Fairy Tales,” is related to the series, but also a departure. It doesn’t feature the adventuring twins, but instead is a straightforward collection of fairy tales. Twenty ­five stories from the Grimm brothers, Hans Christian Andersen and others, are retold and tidied up a bit by Colfer. 

I recommend it for three reasons. First, Colfer — an actor most famous for playing a countertenor teenager on “Glee” — is a wizard at voices. In “Henny Penny,” he gives distinct, birdlike cadences to a duck, a goose, hen, rooster and a turkey. His yawn from Goldilocks was convincing enough to make me yawn in the driver’s seat. 

Second, ….

Read More

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Books & Cupcakes • March Book Photo Challenge

Day 6: Spine
Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen
The Magicians by Lev Grossman
The Crane Wife by Patrick Ness
The Shock of the Fall by Nathan Filer
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
Siege and Storm by Leigh Bardugo
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

These are some of my favourite spines from my bookshelves. Apparently I’m a sucker for blues and greens!