failure-indeed

  • From the final Victorian scene
  • SHERLOCK: Have you written up your account of the case?
  • JOHN: Yes.
  • SHERLOCK: Modified to put it down as one of my rare failures, of course?
  • JOHN: Of course.
  • John has agreed to pretend the case was a failure when Sherlock's indeed solved it. A case about an Abominable Bride who turned out to be living murderers, using the name of a dead woman, to shoot the men in their life whom have wronged them. But that wasn't the only case he'd solved. The matter of Moriarty suddenly coming back from the dead. The matter of the Watson's own unhappy marriage. And yet, Mary wasn't a disguised bride using the name of a dead woman to veil her plans for murder- oh wait.
  • We must stick to our prepared words, Watson.
  • For now.
3

“That is a failing indeed!” cried Elizabeth. “Implacable resentment is a shade in a character. But you have chosen your fault well. I really cannot laugh at it. You are safe from me.”

“There is, I believe, in every disposition a tendency to some particular evil — a natural defect, which not even the best education can overcome.”

“And your defect is to hate everybody.”

“And yours,” he replied with a smile, “is willfully to misunderstand them.”

- Pride and Prejudice (images BBC 1980, 2005 and 1995)