fafoo

When you’re explaining what you love about something you love, or praising what’s wonderful about a wonderful person, or having something you never understood properly explained to you for the first time, there’s a unique kind of tears that well up in you. I wish everyone wouldn’t try to keep them in, but let them flow.
—  Fafoo
I think it’s extremely fortunate when you can be with someone who makes you think “I want to be cool in front of them,” “I want to look beautiful in front of them,” or “I don’t want this person to make fun of me.” And the most envious thing is being with someone who gives you the feelings of both “I don’t want to disappoint them” and “they’ll accept me no matter what happens.”
—  Fafoo
People who at night replay conversations they had during the day to reflect on them, people who actually arrived at the appointed place 30 minutes early but only show themselves 1 or 2 minutes late, people who take initiative and get in the back when entering onto a small path as a group of three, people who hesitate to call someone they’ve eaten with several times a “friend”: I want you all to stay just the way you are.
—  Fafoo
If I could send one message back to myself ten years ago, I’d want to say “The stories you want to write now, the pictures you want to draw, the songs you want to sing, you’ll forget them all by the time you’re an adult.” You forget things in order starting from the most beautiful, the most rich. So write them down like your life depends on it, I would tell him.
—  Fafoo
Lately, readers have emailed me saying “I want to support my favorite authors, but it bothers me that there’s no way to support them other than buying their books.” My personal thought on this is that if I’m within earshot of someone saying “that was a good book,” nothing can make me happier. But I mean, if you want to give me 500 million yen or something, I’ll take it…
—  Fafoo
If you really think about it, most occupations have at least one element that makes you think “you couldn’t do this without being broken as a human being.” Perhaps when a person is suited for a particular job, it’s less dependent on “their skills in that area,” moreso “their suitability for being broken down in that area.”
—  Fafoo
I say this knowing full well that something similar has been said by thousands and thousands of people, but “Because you called my name” is a great lyric for how cowardly it is. It’s not “Because you embraced me,” it’s not “Because you held my hand” - the innocence of “you called my name” being put in first place is perfect at making my heart wince.
—  Fafoo
I once knew someone with a really wonderful singing voice, who when asked the trick to it, replied: “I sing in a whisper that can be heard from far in the distance.” It’s left a strong impression on me; because indeed, it’s surprisingly reminiscent of my own definition for good writing - “like whispering secrets into everyone’s ears.”
—  Fafoo
“Hello, mister night-owl?” “Hello, miss insomniac.” “Oh good, you’re awake. I feel I won’t be able to sleep again tonight, so tell me one of your boring stories.” “I’m all out.” “That’s all right. Your stories are usually boring anyway.” “Alright, I’ll tell you about my first love.” “Ooh, this one sounds boring!”‘
—  Fafoo
I can remember the books I steathily read during class with unusual clarity. I can still recall the places I slipped out of lectures to go visit. I have a strong attachment to the games I played as a breather between studying for tests. Occasionally, a bothersome focus will supply a charming digression. Perhaps I currently lack a “bothersome focus.”
—  Fafoo

[In response to a question about the two-character style of his works:]
I believe I became conscious of the “worldview of just the two of us” when I read Otsuichi’s short story “Happiness Has the Form of a Kitten” in middle school. At the time, I thought “I want to read lots of stories like this,” but I could never really find many, so I inevitably came to imagine similar stories of my own.

The reason I and people like me prefer stories with not many characters is naturally in part because of a lack of sociality, but I think it’s also a lack of trust in “communication” that results in seeking a deeper connection. To meet this request, you have no choice but to narrow down the number of characters.

Not watching TV or looking online, not reading the newspaper or magazines, always wearing headphones and looking down as they walk - two people who cut off communication with other people, unaware that the Earth will soon be struck with a giant meteorite, have an average meeting, averagely fall for each other, averagely come together, and while they’re thinking “Huh, people are being kinda noisy,” the world ends.

— 

Fafoo

(The last tweet was 2 hours later, so it’s probably not “connected” to the others, but also, it really is.)

It’s boring how a “How would you spend your time if the world was ending tomorrow?” survey gets nothing but safe answers like “be with my family or lover,” “spend all my money,” “do what I always wanted to do.” So I’d like there to be a survey exclusively for people with no family, no lovers, no wealth, and no goals. I feel like that could get some really intriguing responses.
—  Fafoo
Little Miss AI: “If I abandoned my programmed duties and began to focus intensely on writing “a story about a fictional AI fulfilling its programmed duties,” would you consider me broken?”
Me: “Perhaps.”
Little Miss AI: “Which means that you’re broken.”
Me: “Perhaps…”
—  Fafoo

Between “I got interested because it seems popular” and “I lost interest because it got popular,” I suppose the former is healthier. And between “I became a fan recently, but don’t know their older works yet” and “I’m a longtime fan, but don’t care about their recent works,” I suppose as a creator, yes, I’m more grateful for the former.

…Or so I wrote, but it gave me a painful understanding of this feeling: “What I wanted was that poor kitten I can see from here, soaked in the rain. What I have here is a cute kitten, not soaked, which you put in my arms. This isn’t what I wanted.” (from The Foreign Duck, the Native Duck, and God in a Coin Locker).

—  Fafoo
A girl your age who took the same bus to school for three years, but never talked to you once up to graduation; a boy you played with in the park daily as a kid, but never knew the name of; a cat who would, no matter when, always glare at you from the window whenever you passed in front of its house. I like to think about “those who you don’t know at all, yet know very well.”
—  Fafoo
In my case, whenever I portray “fated love,” it’s always entwined with a supernatural phenomenon. By contradiction, I think that also indicates a cynical worldview of “without some kind of supernatural phenomenon, fated love can’t exist.” It’s fun to compare “5 Centimeters Per Second” and “Your Name.” with that kind of perspective.
—  Fafoo
I love the forlorn atmosphere of tourist locations during the off season. I can’t get enough of how all the tourist facilities and lodgings feel like they have more than they know what to do with. Walking around a town like that all day, coming to realize “Wow, there’s nothing to do!”, getting a meal at a chain restaurant, and going home without taking a single photo - that’s fun in its own way.
—  Fafoo

When I was about five, I asked my mother “Why aren’t grown-ups afraid of ghosts?” She replied, “It’s not like they’re not afraid of ghosts. They just have less time to think about them.” As an adult now, I feel like I’m able to keep a cool head about many things, yet maybe it really is just “I have less time to think about them.”

With our better understanding, we’ve said we’re giving up on “love as fierce as a romance novel,” “youth as invigorating as a shonen manga,” “a household as warm as a family drama.” But if, someday, we personally witnessed these things becoming “real,” I wonder if we could keep ourselves together? I wonder if we could resolutely stay grown-ups?

—  Fafoo
As soon as you’re told “Okay, talk to me about anything,” you can’t say a word. People who can skillfully get others to talk will start off by limiting the topics to some extent. Which made me think, maybe people who can fluidly write sentence after sentence are “skilled at making themselves talk.” Capable of repeatedly narrowing down topics in the appropriate direction.
—  Fafoo