facebook brands

i love and hate how music can just bring you to the past with a few notes with a melody in the lyrics that can whisk you away to a time that passed. you can feel what you did then right? happiness. sadness. regret. love. it’s like a time machine

Wait, why is “The Dodo” bad?

I got quite a few questions and responses about why the online brand / website / Facebook page “The Dodo” shouldn’t be supported. Here’s a quick rundown:

  • Misguided Anti-Captivity. They are often blatantly anti-captivity, or use anti-captivity language and/or promote anti-captivity views. They use language such as an animal is “trapped” in a zoo or an animal was “saved” from a zoo. They actively support and often get quotes from representatives from ZooCheck, an anti-zoo and anti-captivity organization, and support HSUS (Humane Society of the United States). Their reports on tragedies of animals being injured or dying at zoos are overwhelmingly full of blame, toxicity, and disrespect. Their ideas of anti-captivity are incredibly limited and misguided – they are often pro “sanctuary” with the idea that all sanctuaries are better and they rarely discuss any kind of conservation.
  • Anthropomorphism over Accuracy. They are wildly, ridiculously, inaccurately anthropomorphic. For example, a picture of a bear leaned against a wall is captioned as: “He looks desperate, depressed, despondent. He stares up, seeming to search for a way out.” They described an owl resting on someone’s shoulder as “missing the man who saved her so much she couldn’t stop hugging him.” A kitten “looks at his rescuers face to be reassured everything is okay.”  One of their most recent articles is about a cow “shedding tears” and crying because it is sad. Overall, they are much more concerned with ‘tugging on heartstrings’ of animal lovers than with being accurate about animal behavior. 
  • Unsafe Animal Interactions and Inappropriate Pets. Despite being anti-captivity when it comes to zoos specifically, they have often published videos of exotic pets and/or inappropriate free contact with wild/dangerous animals. 
  • Lack of Primary Sources and Information. They often lack any resources to accurate information about their “news”. Recently they made a 45-second video which claimed that basically any elephant on display (from a Ringling Circus to a rural south Asian performance) was automatically and certainly being abused and tortured. There were no sources or proof to back this up, no resources to explore, nothing. They rarely have any kind of scientist or animal care worker as a source for any video or article, just activists. 
  • Stealing and Editing Videos. You’ll notice almost every video on their site is made by them and hosted there, not shared from somewhere else. They take videos from other sources, add music and text, and call it their own. They almost never link to the original source. 

Overall, “The Dodo” is not a news site. It’s a brand. It’s a website designed to get views and make money - it will do anything just to get those clicks. But it tries to sell itself as news, and therein lies the issue. They use strong language, buzzwords, and clickbait titles in order to push a vague, biased agenda that hurts those of us who work in zoos and other animal facilities.

Here is another strong, detailed breakdown of some of their common practices written by Why Animals Do the Thing

Help me understand this “cringe” stuff….what’s the purpose? You just find other people’s awkwardness really really really funny and like to share that humor, or do you want them to get trolled, feel badly and change themselves/quit the internet? I mean, are you trying to “punish” people for being embarrassing? ….I notice a lot of the stuff you post as cringe is fake to begin with, are you aware of that and it’s part of the joke or what?

Someone sent me this on my personal blog but it fits better here.

Personally I haven’t found “cringe” as a genre funny for like 5 years. That was a big part of rebranding the main page, was keeping up with changing tastes, especially here, which moves faster than, say, facebook, where the “cringe” branding still does very well. Hell, it may actually do well here, too, but not with any demographic we’re interested in catering to, which would just end with us publishing things that would be at odds with that group and reducing the kind of reach we get.

Most of the stuff we post is meant to be either vaguely like the RP/video game forum kid of the 2000s (t. former video game forum kid), but for this decade. Stuff like kin and younger anti-sjws is in this bin. They’ll grow out of it, and eventually they’ll leave that identity all the way in the past. We all did it, it’s kinda internet tradition at this point. I know I did. It’s like laughing about the stupid things you remember from middle school, you know? Except permanent, and on the internet.

The other half is “why would someone post that?”, like the blatant facebook homophobe or racist, or most of the stuff that terfs post, or 90% of pol stuff (although that’s also in the first category because a lot of /pol/ is full on children). In which case, I at least feel nothing when they get what’s coming to them, or get deactivated by tumblr, because people like misogenious or whatever his url was deserve it.

Half of millennials think that YouTube has the most annoying ads

Facebook and YouTube are unquestionably two of the world’s most popular digital platforms. And with such large audiences up for grabs, it’s no wonder that advertisers are pouring funds into both businesses: Facebook generated close to $27 billion in advertising revenue in 2016, and though Google doesn’t break out YouTube sales, it credits the video platform as a crucial driver of its advertising revenue, which topped $79 billion last year.

Unfortunately for brands, Facebook and YouTube serve up the most annoying ads, according to BI Intelligence’s 2017 Digital Trust survey. In a virtual tie, ads on Facebook and YouTube were deemed the most irksome by 45% and 43% of the survey's 1,740 respondents, respectively. Twitter garnered just 6% of the vote, followed by Instagram and Snapchat at 3%, and LinkedIn at 1%.

(BI Intelligence)

It’s not surprising that these two platforms are reputed to have the most annoying ads. Of the platforms included in the survey, Facebook and YouTube are the top two destinations of digital time spent in the US, according to comScore. People may be more sensitive to ads on Facebook and YouTube simply because they spend more time, and therefore see more ads, on these sites. And because Facebook and YouTube are relatively mature social platforms, they likely serve ads with greater and more noticeable frequency. 

Millennials and baby boomers are divided on which platform serves the worst ads. Their preferences are inversely related by age group: Older survey respondents like YouTube ads more than Facebook ads, and vice versa for younger respondents. The familiarity that older people have with traditional TV may explain their tolerance for YouTube ads, which consist of pre- and mid-roll ads that resemble ad interruptions in linear programming.

(BI Intelligence)

These results point to a pressing need to improve advertising on both Facebook and YouTube. For its part, Facebook has said it’s curbing growth in its ad load — or the ratio of ads to organic posts. YouTube was similarly mindful when it scrapped its unskippable 30-second ad format in February. However, the onus to improve the ad experience shouldn’t be entirely on platforms. Brand advertisers also need to create quality ads that provide pleasurable viewing experiences. The reality is, the campaigns they’re running on the most popular platforms — in which they’re investing the most money, to reach the widest audiences — aren’t resonating. 

BI Intelligence’s Digital Trust survey examines consumers’ perception of major social platforms. It rates Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, and LinkedIn on security, community, user experience, and content authenticity and shareability to help brands and marketers make informed decisions about what platforms to spend their marketing and branding dollars on. The full report will be available through BI Intelligence in May.

Click here to sign up for more BI Intelligence content like this



More From Business Insider
Facebook and YouTube have the most annoying ads by far

Facebook and YouTube are unquestionably two of the world’s most popular digital platforms. And with such large audiences up for grabs, it’s no wonder that advertisers are pouring funds into both businesses: Facebook generated close to $27 billion in advertising revenue in 2016, and though Google doesn’t break out YouTube sales, it credits the video platform as a crucial driver of its advertising revenue, which topped $79 billion last year.

Unfortunately for brands, Facebook and YouTube serve up the most annoying ads, according to BI Intelligence’s 2017 Digital Trust survey. In a virtual tie, ads on Facebook and YouTube were deemed the most irksome by 45% and 43% of the survey's 1,740 respondents, respectively. Twitter garnered just 6% of the vote, followed by Instagram and Snapchat at 3%, and LinkedIn at 1%.

(BI Intelligence)

It’s not surprising that these two platforms are reputed to have the most annoying ads. Of the platforms included in the survey, Facebook and YouTube are the top two destinations of digital time spent in the US, according to comScore. People may be more sensitive to ads on Facebook and YouTube simply because they spend more time, and therefore see more ads, on these sites. And because Facebook and YouTube are relatively mature social platforms, they likely serve ads with greater and more noticeable frequency. 

Millennials and baby boomers are divided on which platform serves the worst ads. Their preferences are inversely related by age group: Older survey respondents like YouTube ads more than Facebook ads, and vice versa for younger respondents. The familiarity that older people have with traditional TV may explain their tolerance for YouTube ads, which consist of pre- and mid-roll ads that resemble ad interruptions in linear programming.

(BI Intelligence)

These results point to a pressing need to improve advertising on both Facebook and YouTube. For its part, Facebook has said it’s curbing growth in its ad load — or the ratio of ads to organic posts. YouTube was similarly mindful when it scrapped its unskippable 30-second ad format in February. However, the onus to improve the ad experience shouldn’t be entirely on platforms. Brand advertisers also need to create quality ads that provide pleasurable viewing experiences. The reality is, the campaigns they’re running on the most popular platforms — in which they’re investing the most money, to reach the widest audiences — aren’t resonating. 

BI Intelligence’s Digital Trust survey examines consumers’ perception of major social platforms. It rates Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, and LinkedIn on security, community, user experience, and content authenticity and shareability to help brands and marketers make informed decisions about what platforms to spend their marketing and branding dollars on. The full report will be available through BI Intelligence in May.

Click here to sign up for more BI Intelligence content like this



More From Business Insider
Facebook adds a million advertisers in 7 months

(BI Intelligence)

This story was delivered to BI Intelligence “Digital Media Briefing” subscribers. To learn more and subscribe, please click here.

More than 5 million businesses are advertising on Facebook each month, Reuters reports.

That is up from 4 million monthly advertisers in September 2016, and the 3 million monthly advertisers it had in March 2016.

  • Facebook is one of two undisputed titans in digital advertising. Alongside Google, the company is expected to generate a little under half of online ad spend in 2018, expects eMarketer. Facebook generated close to $27 billion, and Google close to $80 billion, in ad revenue last year. AOL (soon to be combined with Yahoo), Amazon, and Snapchat are in the next tier of digital ad players, but their businesses remain a fraction of the size of Google and Facebook.
  • Small and midsize brands are flocking to advertise on Facebook. Big brands may drive the bulk of revenue in advertising markets, but there is still ample opportunity for growth along the long-tail of smaller brand advertisers. The sheer volume of advertisers on Facebook reflects the company’s success in attracting these smaller firms its platform. But significant upside remains—Facebook’s 5 million advertisers are just 8% of the 65 million businesses that are active on the network.
  • A few industries are generating the bulk of Facebook ad spend.  E-commerce and retail, and entertainment and media are the biggest industries represented in Facebook’s advertiser base. Products sold in these industries complement Facebook’s platform (compared to, say, automotive advertising). The social network can target people precisely, link out to e-commerce sites and has its own native shopping functionalities, and is also perfect for viral sharing of media.
  • The fastest-growing markets, not surprisingly, are all overseas. Facebook is doing a great job at building its advertising base overseas — over 75% of advertisers are outside of the US. India, Thailand, Brazil, Mexico and Argentina are the fastest-growing markets. It’s unclear whether is counting growth in terms of ad spend or advertiser additions, but it’s likely the latter. All but Argentina from the above mentioned markets are in Facebook’s top-10 countries by user base.
  • Mobile usability a big focus for Facebook to grow advertisers. The company is adding more tools to facilitate make advertising on mobile devices easier, including an update to the Ads Manager app. Almost 50% of advertisers create ads on mobile devices. More than 90% of Facebook users access the network via mobile. And mobile advertising accounts for 84% of ad revenue. Creating mobile-first experiences is particularly key in emerging markets.

There’s no question that consumers are increasing the amount of time they spend consuming digital media, while advertisers are increasing their ad budgets into digital channels. What may come as a surprise, however, is the complexity of the interconnected web of companies involved in the process of delivering digital advertisements to end users. Collectively, these companies are known as “advertising technology,” or “ad tech” for short.

Ad tech companies are intermediaries between advertisers and publishers, and add value to the ad delivery process by consolidating inventory, automating workflows, and offering precise targeting capabilities at scale. The automation of ad buying is also known as “programmatic advertising” — that is, using technology and software to buy digital ads. Programmatic ad spend in the US is quickly ramping up: It will top $20 billion this year and reach $38.5 billion by year-end 2020. 

But ad tech’s ascendancy isn’t without its drawbacks. The advertising industry in the US is dominated by two main players: Facebook and Google. As a result, ad tech players are fighting for a pretty small piece of revenue pie, one of the many drivers of increased consolidation in the space.

Kevin Gallagher, research analyst for BI Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service, has compiled a detailed report on ad tech that examines the different players involved in the process of delivering ads, the formats that are driving growth (notably mobile and video), and the factors that are driving increased consolidation over the coming years.

Here are some key points from the report:

  • By 2020, mobile will be the biggest online advertising market, and video the fastest growing.
  • So-called “walled gardens” Google and Facebook lead a relatively small group of players that attract the vast majority of digital-ad spending in the US today. 
  • Growth can be challenging for players outside the walled-garden duopoly, and many companies are reaching a level of maturity that may prompt investors to push for an exit.
  • Ad tech is poised for consolidation, and the number of companies in the industry will decline significantly over the next few years.
  • Companies specializing in certain ad formats like mobile, video, and TV are attractive targets. They are well positioned to take advantage of the fastest growing segments of digital media.

In full, the report:

  • Forecasts US programmatic revenue through 2020.
  • Highlights the factors driving consolidation, and identifies new acquirers and attractive targets.
  • Explores the challenges ad tech companies face including the dominance of walled gardens, ad blocking and measurement.
  • Outlines emerging technologies that will help propel ad growth in the next decade.

Interested in getting the full report? Here are two ways to access it:

  1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you’ll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. » START A MEMBERSHIP
  2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store.» BUY THE REPORT


More From Business Insider
Facebook adds a million advertisers in 7 months

(BI Intelligence)

This story was delivered to BI Intelligence “Digital Media Briefing” subscribers. To learn more and subscribe, please click here.

More than 5 million businesses are advertising on Facebook each month, Reuters reports.

That is up from 4 million monthly advertisers in September 2016, and the 3 million monthly advertisers it had in March 2016.

  • Facebook is one of two undisputed titans in digital advertising. Alongside Google, the company is expected to generate a little under half of online ad spend in 2018, expects eMarketer. Facebook generated close to $27 billion, and Google close to $80 billion, in ad revenue last year. AOL (soon to be combined with Yahoo), Amazon, and Snapchat are in the next tier of digital ad players, but their businesses remain a fraction of the size of Google and Facebook.
  • Small and midsize brands are flocking to advertise on Facebook. Big brands may drive the bulk of revenue in advertising markets, but there is still ample opportunity for growth along the long-tail of smaller brand advertisers. The sheer volume of advertisers on Facebook reflects the company’s success in attracting these smaller firms its platform. But significant upside remains—Facebook’s 5 million advertisers are just 8% of the 65 million businesses that are active on the network.
  • A few industries are generating the bulk of Facebook ad spend.  E-commerce and retail, and entertainment and media are the biggest industries represented in Facebook’s advertiser base. Products sold in these industries complement Facebook’s platform (compared to, say, automotive advertising). The social network can target people precisely, link out to e-commerce sites and has its own native shopping functionalities, and is also perfect for viral sharing of media.
  • The fastest-growing markets, not surprisingly, are all overseas. Facebook is doing a great job at building its advertising base overseas — over 75% of advertisers are outside of the US. India, Thailand, Brazil, Mexico and Argentina are the fastest-growing markets. It’s unclear whether is counting growth in terms of ad spend or advertiser additions, but it’s likely the latter. All but Argentina from the above mentioned markets are in Facebook’s top-10 countries by user base.
  • Mobile usability a big focus for Facebook to grow advertisers. The company is adding more tools to facilitate make advertising on mobile devices easier, including an update to the Ads Manager app. Almost 50% of advertisers create ads on mobile devices. More than 90% of Facebook users access the network via mobile. And mobile advertising accounts for 84% of ad revenue. Creating mobile-first experiences is particularly key in emerging markets.

There’s no question that consumers are increasing the amount of time they spend consuming digital media, while advertisers are increasing their ad budgets into digital channels. What may come as a surprise, however, is the complexity of the interconnected web of companies involved in the process of delivering digital advertisements to end users. Collectively, these companies are known as “advertising technology,” or “ad tech” for short.

Ad tech companies are intermediaries between advertisers and publishers, and add value to the ad delivery process by consolidating inventory, automating workflows, and offering precise targeting capabilities at scale. The automation of ad buying is also known as “programmatic advertising” — that is, using technology and software to buy digital ads. Programmatic ad spend in the US is quickly ramping up: It will top $20 billion this year and reach $38.5 billion by year-end 2020. 

But ad tech’s ascendancy isn’t without its drawbacks. The advertising industry in the US is dominated by two main players: Facebook and Google. As a result, ad tech players are fighting for a pretty small piece of revenue pie, one of the many drivers of increased consolidation in the space.

Kevin Gallagher, research analyst for BI Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service, has compiled a detailed report on ad tech that examines the different players involved in the process of delivering ads, the formats that are driving growth (notably mobile and video), and the factors that are driving increased consolidation over the coming years.

Here are some key points from the report:

  • By 2020, mobile will be the biggest online advertising market, and video the fastest growing.
  • So-called “walled gardens” Google and Facebook lead a relatively small group of players that attract the vast majority of digital-ad spending in the US today. 
  • Growth can be challenging for players outside the walled-garden duopoly, and many companies are reaching a level of maturity that may prompt investors to push for an exit.
  • Ad tech is poised for consolidation, and the number of companies in the industry will decline significantly over the next few years.
  • Companies specializing in certain ad formats like mobile, video, and TV are attractive targets. They are well positioned to take advantage of the fastest growing segments of digital media.

In full, the report:

  • Forecasts US programmatic revenue through 2020.
  • Highlights the factors driving consolidation, and identifies new acquirers and attractive targets.
  • Explores the challenges ad tech companies face including the dominance of walled gardens, ad blocking and measurement.
  • Outlines emerging technologies that will help propel ad growth in the next decade.

Interested in getting the full report? Here are two ways to access it:

  1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you’ll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. » START A MEMBERSHIP
  2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store.» BUY THE REPORT


More From Business Insider
Facebook adds a million advertisers in 7 months

(BI Intelligence)

This story was delivered to BI Intelligence “Digital Media Briefing” subscribers. To learn more and subscribe, please click here.

More than 5 million businesses are advertising on Facebook each month, Reuters reports.

That is up from 4 million monthly advertisers in September 2016, and the 3 million monthly advertisers it had in March 2016.

  • Facebook is one of two undisputed titans in digital advertising. Alongside Google, the company is expected to generate a little under half of online ad spend in 2018, expects eMarketer. Facebook generated close to $27 billion, and Google close to $80 billion, in ad revenue last year. AOL (soon to be combined with Yahoo), Amazon, and Snapchat are in the next tier of digital ad players, but their businesses remain a fraction of the size of Google and Facebook.
  • Small and midsize brands are flocking to advertise on Facebook. Big brands may drive the bulk of revenue in advertising markets, but there is still ample opportunity for growth along the long-tail of smaller brand advertisers. The sheer volume of advertisers on Facebook reflects the company’s success in attracting these smaller firms its platform. But significant upside remains—Facebook’s 5 million advertisers are just 8% of the 65 million businesses that are active on the network.
  • A few industries are generating the bulk of Facebook ad spend.  E-commerce and retail, and entertainment and media are the biggest industries represented in Facebook’s advertiser base. Products sold in these industries complement Facebook’s platform (compared to, say, automotive advertising). The social network can target people precisely, link out to e-commerce sites and has its own native shopping functionalities, and is also perfect for viral sharing of media.
  • The fastest-growing markets, not surprisingly, are all overseas. Facebook is doing a great job at building its advertising base overseas — over 75% of advertisers are outside of the US. India, Thailand, Brazil, Mexico and Argentina are the fastest-growing markets. It’s unclear whether is counting growth in terms of ad spend or advertiser additions, but it’s likely the latter. All but Argentina from the above mentioned markets are in Facebook’s top-10 countries by user base.
  • Mobile usability a big focus for Facebook to grow advertisers. The company is adding more tools to facilitate make advertising on mobile devices easier, including an update to the Ads Manager app. Almost 50% of advertisers create ads on mobile devices. More than 90% of Facebook users access the network via mobile. And mobile advertising accounts for 84% of ad revenue. Creating mobile-first experiences is particularly key in emerging markets.

There’s no question that consumers are increasing the amount of time they spend consuming digital media, while advertisers are increasing their ad budgets into digital channels. What may come as a surprise, however, is the complexity of the interconnected web of companies involved in the process of delivering digital advertisements to end users. Collectively, these companies are known as “advertising technology,” or “ad tech” for short.

Ad tech companies are intermediaries between advertisers and publishers, and add value to the ad delivery process by consolidating inventory, automating workflows, and offering precise targeting capabilities at scale. The automation of ad buying is also known as “programmatic advertising” — that is, using technology and software to buy digital ads. Programmatic ad spend in the US is quickly ramping up: It will top $20 billion this year and reach $38.5 billion by year-end 2020. 

But ad tech’s ascendancy isn’t without its drawbacks. The advertising industry in the US is dominated by two main players: Facebook and Google. As a result, ad tech players are fighting for a pretty small piece of revenue pie, one of the many drivers of increased consolidation in the space.

Kevin Gallagher, research analyst for BI Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service, has compiled a detailed report on ad tech that examines the different players involved in the process of delivering ads, the formats that are driving growth (notably mobile and video), and the factors that are driving increased consolidation over the coming years.

Here are some key points from the report:

  • By 2020, mobile will be the biggest online advertising market, and video the fastest growing.
  • So-called “walled gardens” Google and Facebook lead a relatively small group of players that attract the vast majority of digital-ad spending in the US today. 
  • Growth can be challenging for players outside the walled-garden duopoly, and many companies are reaching a level of maturity that may prompt investors to push for an exit.
  • Ad tech is poised for consolidation, and the number of companies in the industry will decline significantly over the next few years.
  • Companies specializing in certain ad formats like mobile, video, and TV are attractive targets. They are well positioned to take advantage of the fastest growing segments of digital media.

In full, the report:

  • Forecasts US programmatic revenue through 2020.
  • Highlights the factors driving consolidation, and identifies new acquirers and attractive targets.
  • Explores the challenges ad tech companies face including the dominance of walled gardens, ad blocking and measurement.
  • Outlines emerging technologies that will help propel ad growth in the next decade.

Interested in getting the full report? Here are two ways to access it:

  1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you’ll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. » START A MEMBERSHIP
  2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store.» BUY THE REPORT


More From Business Insider