face-on-spiral

Today, I fucked up... by accidentally doing acid at work

I work as a cleaner at a night club and one night whilst walking around the dance floor looking for glasses to pick up or wet spots to mop up, I came across 2 vials of acid. Me being the idiot that I am picked up the vial whilst it was slightly open and a bit dropped in to a cut on my finger.

after about 40 minutes i got this weird feeling in my spine and it hit me that i was about to trip and then i started tripping balls, whilst working. I couldn’t look anyone in the eye because their faces started moving and spiralling. it was real intense. What made it worse is that i was working in a deep house room so the music was just freaking me out and the heavy bass made me feel like i was being thrown around the room. At one point I threw up and I felt the skin on my face melt off. As fun as it was i probably wouldn’t do it again.

TL/DR: tripped balls at work. wouldn’t do it again.

by MrGorrillard

Check out more TIFUs: Internet`s best fuck ups are here.

shakespeare au series

modern a midsummer night’s dream

“If we shadows have offended, think but this, and all is mended - that you have but slumbered here while these visions did appear.” - Act 5, Scene 1 (inspired by this post)
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I’d leave it open.

A Black Hole in a Grand Design Spiral Galaxy - M74

Grand Design Spiral Galaxies are classified by their symmetrical spiral arms emanating from a central nucleus. M74, or NGC628, is a face-on spiral galaxy known for its grand design structure. M74 is home to some 100 billion stars; It is and is dotted with clusters of young blue stars and glowing pink regions that will form protostars. In 2002, the Chandra Space Observatory gained evidence that M74 contains an intermediate mass black hole. After studying variations in the amount of X-rays emitted by certain stars, Astrophysicists determined that the mass of the black hole is approximately 10,000 times the mass of our sun.

CreditNASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration, Chandra Space Observatory  

“I have been you, you will be I”


Had a lot of fun with this one. Making silicone old age pieces next week so thought I’d refresh myself with some plain ol’ makeup. Clothes are all painted on too. For best viewing, cover each side then view a a whole.

Send me a message if you are interested in seeing this as a Youtube tutorial, as I’m not sure what the level of interest is for this sort of thing. Feel free to subscribe if my looks tickle your fancy. :)

Hope you’re all having a lovely week x

Hubble Spies a Spiral Snowflake : Together with irregular galaxies, spiral galaxies make up approximately 60 percent of the galaxies in the local universe. However, despite their prevalence, each spiral galaxy is unique like snowflakes, no two are alike. This is demonstrated by the striking face-on spiral galaxy NGC 6814.

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✧・゚:*✧・゚:* korra calmly and resolutely controlling immense amounts of power and strength  *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

Starburst Galaxy Messier 94 : Beautiful island universe Messier 94 lies a mere 15 million light-years distant in the northern constellation of the hunting dogs, Canes Venatici. A popular target for earth-based astronomers, the face-on spiral galaxy is about 30,000 light-years across, with spiral arms sweeping through the outskirts of its broad disk. But this Hubble Space Telescope field of view spans about 7,000 light-years or so across M94’s central region. The sharp close-up examines the galaxy’s compact, bright nucleus and prominent inner dust lanes, surrounded by a remarkable bluish ring of young, massive stars. The massive stars in the ring are all likely less than 10 million years old, indicating the galaxy experienced a well-defined era of rapid star formation. As a result, while the small, bright nucleus is typical of the Seyfert class of active galaxies, M94 is also known as a starburst galaxy. Because M94 is relatively nearby, astronomers can explore in detail reasons for the galaxy’s burst of star formation. via NASA

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This image was taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and shows a starburst galaxy named MCG+07-33-027. This galaxy lies some 300 million light-years away from us, and is currently experiencing an extraordinarily high rate of star formation — a starburst. 

Normal galaxies produce only a couple of new stars per year, but starburst galaxies can produce a hundred times more than that. As MCG+07-33-027 is seen face-on, the galaxy’s spiral arms and the bright star-forming regions within them are clearly visible and easy for astronomers to study.

In order to form newborn stars, the parent galaxy has to hold a large reservoir of gas, which is slowly depleted to spawn stars over time. For galaxies in a state of starburst, this intense period of star formation has to be triggered somehow — often this happens due to a collision with another galaxy. MCG+07-33-027, however, is special; while many galaxies are located within a large cluster of galaxies, MCG+07-33-027 is a field galaxy, which means it is rather isolated. Thus, the triggering of the starburst was most likely not due to a collision with a neighboring or passing galaxy and astronomers are still speculating about the cause. The bright object to the right of the galaxy is a foreground star in our own galaxy.

Object Names: MCG+07-33-027

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA and N. Grogin (STScI)

Text credit: European Space Agency

Time And Space