fabric covered button

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On the auction block :

A lavender organdy cocktail dress worn by Grace Kelly in her Golden Globe winning and Oscar nominated role as the prim Linda Nordley in Mogambo (MGM, 1953). The dress has a fitted boned bodice with sweetheart neckline, decorative fabric covered buttons, and three-quarter sleeves with a full layered skirt with a slubbed silk skirt over organdy petticoat. A bias label typed “Grace Kelly P-777-2636” is present.

As the film is set on an African safari this is the most elaborate costume worn by Kelly. Costume design by Helen Rose, who also designed Kelly’s wedding gown for the church ceremony at Monaco’s Saint Nicholas Cathedral when she wed Prince Rainier III.

The live televised wedding was estimated to have been watched by over 30 million viewers. The dress had professional conservation work performed by Museo de la Moda in Santiago, Chile. Accompanied by a copy of the film.

ICONS & IDOLS: HOLLYWOOD AND MORE(#3170) 11/17/2017 10:00 AM PST

LOT 128 OF 242: GRACE KELLY MOGAMBO COCKTAIL DRESS

Credit: JULIEN’S AUCTIONS

anonymous asked:

I just only recently got into 1860s fashion, but after reading a couple of statements by reenactors online I am confused? Most state that fabric covered buttons were not very common back then, but a lot of dresses I've seen in museums/online seem to feature them? Also I'm puzzled that the blouse/skirt combo is so rare in 1860s US since it's been part of traditional clothing all over Europe for a very long time?

Hello! Sorry for the extremely delayed response! Tumblr failed to notify me of any messages for months and my hectic schedule kept me from checking (and posting much - sorry followers! My Master’s Degree was beckoning!)

My best advice to you is to trust what is extant. Items you see in museums are what they are and art from the time is a primary source. While many re-enactors have doubtlessly studied these pieces as well, going back to the source material is the surest way to understand them. (I myself constructed an 1860s dress featuring covered buttons using a pattern adapted from an extant garment, and backed up by my own additional research).

As far as I know the blouse/skirt combo was perfectly common during the 1860s, however before this time in America, it mainly surfaced as lower class/ work clothing, like the petticoat/short gown combo of the 18th century (check out Colonial Williamsburg’s website for a great little game which illustrates this). By the 1860s, however, I believe it was more common in the middle and upper classes, though certainly still a more casual option for daytime only. You will often see women wearing a blouse and skirt with a swiss waist (belt) that was popular at this time.

Perhaps the reason it does not appear in America the way is does in European folk dress is because there is not really an American ethnic tradition (and when I say this I am referring only to European settlers and their descendants; Native Americans of all nations have rich traditions of dress, including many types of garments which might fit into the categories of blouses and skirts) - rather, Euro-Americans brought many traditions from Europe and practiced them within their own ethnic groups, but also blended them together with others to form a new American aesthetic.

Additionally, as I mentioned before, skirt/blouse ensembles before the mid-19th century were typically lower class, and at this time, before photography, visual records of lower class people were much harder to come by.

I hope this thoroughly answered your questions, and I do apologize for rambling on, especially so long after you asked this in the first place!

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My love of fashion began with vintage, a long time ago. It was always the small things, the tiny details. The fabric covered buttons, edges of meticulous stitching, plush velvet and silks that rustled when I moved. And if a lot of it was scratchy polyester too, I was still charmed by how different everything looked compared to what the early 2000s had to offer (it was that long ago!) My fondness for vintage has grown with me over the years. When I look at my wardrobe now, my most beloved pieces are still the ones dating 50, 60, 70 years ago. There’s something special about wearing a part of history on your back.

I’ve teamed up with three equally vintage loving bloggers today for this post. Joi, Sacramento, and Cynthia are all posting on the same theme, so do check out their amazing vintage outfits which I’ve totally been blown away by! I’m legendarily awkward about doing collaborations, mostly due to my scoliosis leaving me with very few spoons, and I hate letting people down! But I’m so delighted and honoured that Joi asked me to do this - if nothing else, just for that wonderful feeling of community with people halfway across the world who share a similar fashion ethos. I decided to wear a vintage Bavarian dress for this post, one which had been languishing in my closet for ages. My accessories are contemporary, but they’re secondary to the dress, which is the centrepiece. I felt like some kind of a fairy queen of summer, twirling around in Ulsoor lake as Tahireh directed and snapped away, and Antara made sure neither of us ended up in the water from too much enthusiasm. It was one of those perfect storm scenarios that produce absolute photographic perfection.

Don’t forget to visit Joi, Cynthia, and Sacramento’s blogs for their take on vintage love! The links are below for easy access.

In My Joi (Joi) ♥ Skittlis Fashion (Cynthia) ♥ Mis Papelicos (Sacramento)

Wearing ♥ Vintage Bavarian Dress ♥ Flower crown from Elle Santos on Etsy ♥ Gifted bag ♥ New Look Sandals

Photos by Tahireh Lal