f: eyre

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Also important for this list: The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner and “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. 

Follow @monsieurbookshire and @alyssabooking for more classic literature shenanigans. Follow @adultbooklr for more general book shenanigans. Follow @thebooker because she’s great and does cool things like Read for Mental Health Week. 

Also, thanks to @obsessivegirlfan for our pretty new banner. We love you, mom!

Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts, as much as their brothers do; they suffer from too rigid a restraint, too absolute a stagnation, precisely as men would suffer; and it is narrow-minded in their more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags. It is thoughtless to condemn them, or laugh at them, if they seek to do more or learn more than custom has pronounced necessary for their sex.
— 

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte 1846

Perhaps THE passage that started the great feminist movement. To Bronte’s critics, she was disgusting; to the modern feminist reader, she is more than a heroine.

Do you think I am an automaton? — a machine without feelings? and can bear to have my morsel of bread snatched from my lips, and my drop of living water dashed from my cup? Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain, and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong! — I have as much soul as you — and full as much heart! And if God had gifted me with some beauty and much wealth, I should have made it as hard for you to leave me, as it is now for me to leave you. I am not talking to you now through the medium of custom, conventionalities, nor even of mortal flesh: it is my spirit that addresses your spirit; just as if both had passed through the grave, and we stood at God’s feet, equal — as we are!
—  Charlotte Bronte
youtube

this video amazes me, seriously, it's genius!
these lyrics fits perfectly. Well done to the editor of this,
captured Jane’s angst and Rochester’s despair perfectly.

nedlovesyou is the editor, yuo guys.

So did he foil his own?Is he ready to reform?So many torahsSo many for us
The creature fear