f i'm sorry

The end of our 2nd generation girl groups :(
  • KARA: Disbanded
  • 4Minute: Disbanded
  • 2NE1: Disbanded
  • Wonder Girls: Disbanded
  • T-ARA: Disbanded
  • SISTAR: Disbanded
  • Currently the only 2nd Generation Groups left are: SNSD, Brown Eyed Girls, Miss A, f(x), After School, Nine Muses, Girl's Day, Davichi. (However some of these groups I suspect will disband, but their companies have not said anything yet)
imagine your otp kinda

person a: hey come in me bro!

person b: d-don-don’t you mean “come at m-”

person a: bitch did i fucking stutter

Even if you don’t do art, gifsets, edit videos and photos, write fanfics, you are important and fandom wouldn’t exist without you.

That also doesn’t mean that you’re not an artistic type of person.

There are two types of artistic personality:

a creator, who writes, paints, draw, do videos etc.

and a consumer.

The person, who sees art, for whom it’s made. Without them it wouldn’t matter, because there would be nobody to see the creation. It’s one of the most important roles, but many people do it badly.

How to be a good recipient?

First of all, you need to give feedback. Every time you take time to see/read something. And it can’t be any feedback. It must be good.

Doesn’t matter if it’s a fanart, fic, video, poem or something else. Give kudos. Comment it. Even if you didn’t like it. Especially, if you didn’t like it. It takes only 30 seconds to write something and it shows the author that you saw their work and took time to think about it. It really motivates them.

What you should write?

Well, anything you want. “Great job, keep going!”, “I love the way you did it!”, “Wow, amazing work, I’d love to see more!” is enough. Really.

 Of course, if you decide to say something more it’s great! Authors love to read your thoughts about their work. Tell them about the colours they used, how they match the scene and character, how they build the atmosphere with words, how you love the character development, the typhography they made. Tell them about everything that made you “wow, this is amazing”, about the piece that made you smile or cry or laugh or any reaction you had.

Tell them that you are waiting for sequel for this fic. That you can’t wait for the next fanart of this pairing. That you love seeing their work.

Thank them for it. I know that you know that they do it as a hobby, but thank them for spending their time anyway.

Reading this makes their day. And they’ll tell you that.

Okay, but what if you didn’t like it?

Then you have to write a comment anyway. Criticism is the most important for artist. Without it they can’t make progress.

Writing critique is harder than writing a positive feedback. You have to be precise here. The most important rule is:

DO NOT WRITE “I DON’T LIKE IT”

like really

if you want to write something like that, then better don’t write anything.

You must add what you didn’t like, why, and how they can change that. Constructive criticism is the only one which matters. Otherwise you’ll make them not want to create anymore.

So how good criticism looks like?

“The colours you used don’t fit together. If you used warmer shade of red it would look better!”

“The main character of the story is too perfect, you should add them some flaws to make them more real. Perhaps something with their looks - too thin mouth or some scar? Their personality is also too mary sue. Try to give them some bad traits, maybe they can be blunt or a bit ignorant and listen to nobody’s advice?”

“The person you drew has anatomically incorrect legs - it looks like they don’t have knees. Try to work on it looking at some photos.”

The problem with criticism is that inexperienced artists often take it too personally, like an attack. Good solution is to tell them something nice.

“The scenere is beautiful, but…”
“I love how you write descriptions, but there’s something you need to work on…”

When you write comments it’s also important NOT TO DEMAND ANOTHER PIECE OF ART/CHAPTER/SEQUEL/WHATEVER

It makes them not wanting to contiune their work. So, yeah, encourage them, but not demand. “Is there any chance you’ll do it?”, “I can’t wait for more!”, “Please, continue this, I really want to know what happens next!”

What else you can do as a recipient?

Reblog. Not only like, but also reblog, so more people can see it. Don’t repost and if you have to ALWAYS GIVE CREDITS. And no, “source: tumblr” is not a credit (I feel like I should do another post about it)

Buy. I know all of us are broke, but many artists are really cheap (and that makes me sad). Just ask them to do something customized for you, like keychains or something like that. And pay them for it. Or just donate.

And remember

EVEN IF YOU DON’T CREATE YOU ARE IMPORTANT IN FANDOM AND IT WOULDN’T BE THERE WITHOUT YOU

YOU ARE IMPORTANT

YOU MATTER

(feel free to add some things that I forgot and tell me all mistakes I made, it’s late and my brain is tired so I could use some wrong words but I tried)

  • Zen: *sees a bee on MC's shoulder*
  • Zen: uh oh...
  • Zen: *rolls up newspaper*
  • Zen: Babe, stay still...
  • MC: Zen, what are you doi–
  • Zen: *using the newspaper as a megaphone* THERE'S A F**KING BEE ON YOU.
The Answer

It’d be a simple thing to answer Anders’s question, if Hawke didn’t know just how he’d make light of it.

Fenris knows things. Many things, about most things. He tells her of Rivain, and Par Vollen and Seheron and Nevarra, of the Fog Warriors and the Fog Dancers, the Orlesian nobility and the Antivan royalty, the Black Divine and the magisterium and the Circle in Minrathous. He tells her of Ashkaari Koslun and enough of the Qun to untwist the contemptuous curl of the Arishok’s mouth when she addresses him. “You hear much when people regard you as little more than furniture,” Fenris replies when she asks how he even knows all that, but that’s just him, she thinks: had it been her, she would have wasted away in idle fantasy, not learned foreign tongues or woven together the web of Thedosian politics from fragments of conversations.

After a lifetime of casting spells first and asking questions later, though, now she tries to understand instead—and when Fenris starts helping himself to her books after learning to read faster than she did the rules of diamondback, she cracks one open of her own for the first time since Lothering.

(Not a picture book and not a book about dragons. And not Hard in Hightown either, as far as Varric is concerned.)

Fenris never lies. He lied to Hadriana, if that can even be counted as such, but it’s because he broke his word that once that Hawke realises it’s only ever held true otherwise. Fenris only says what he means and always means what he says, and though his honesty has the sharp, serrated edges of rashvine nettle sometimes, once the welts have worn off she’s most often left having to admit that he has the truth of it—and when the entire Kirkwall nobility turns into lickspittles, trying to simper their way into the Champion’s good graces (or into her leathers), she comes to think of Fenris’s forthrightness as an uncut gem: perhaps not as pretty as a stone cut and set, but worth that much more.

Hawke, though? She’s—well, not a liar the way Varric is, but she skirts and shirks and twists the truth, maims and manhandles it, has perhaps even left it for dead a few times. At least with Fenris, though, truth comes to her a little easier.

(Anyway, she’d rather not suffer the smug look on his face whenever he pokes holes in her attempts at deceit.)

Fenris tempers her. With the city-wide revelation of her magic—now the Maker’s grace and not His curse—comes something that no title could ever match: the elation of being a known apostate yet untouchable, the unspeakable relief of the first breath after staying underwater a little too long, an intoxicating rush that she has to swim against lest it carry her too far from herself. It’s little things at first: her reveling in Cullen’s stammers and stutters, a casual mention of her magic to sway the nobles of the Keep her way, a misdirection hex cast to make some arsehole bumble off the pier for calling Merrill “knife ear.”

But when treading the line between freedom and excess becomes a balancing act worthy of an Antivan tightrope walker in the storm, when the line all but vanishes—then she has but to look at Fenris, branded with the hubris of mages, to be stirred away from the Void that sings to her.

(Alright—she can’t quite keep herself from teasing Cullen just to watch his nug-wheel brain run.)

The answer to Anders’s question is simple: Fenris makes her a better woman—perhaps even a good woman, when she wouldn’t be otherwise. “By being the perfect example of what not to do?” Anders would say, though, and it’s not that she doesn’t want to argue with him well into the next age—she just doesn’t have any breath left to waste when a certain elf keeps taking it away.

(She’d complain, but nowhere are her breaths, her heart and the truth of her answer safer than in Fenris’s hands, so she lets him have them.)

So—the sex, she jests instead. She’s with Fenris for the sex.

4

that’s it, that’s the whole show