extraordinary-form

Understanding the Latin Mass

I hope this post helps you understand the Traditional Catholic Mass, which has done so much for my relationship with Jesus! As Cardinal Newman said, “I could attend masses forever and not be tired. It is not a mere form of words – it is a great action, the greatest action that can be on earth… He becomes present on the altar in flesh and blood, before Whom angels bow and devils tremble.”

The different parts of the Mass and their meanings, in two halves:

MASS OF THE CATECHUMENS

PRAYERS AT THE FOOT OF THE ALTAR: Priest adores God
INTROIT: “Entrance” Prayer to hasten God’s advent
KYRIE: Greek, A cry to the Trinity for mercy
GLORIA: Angelic Hymn, an exultation of praise
COLLECTS: Prayers of the day
EPISTLE: Letters and teachings of Apostles
GRADUAL: Psalm to unite prayers with instruction
ALLELUIA: Hebrew, “Praise the Lord”
GOSPEL: The words of Christ
SERMON: Explanation of the Gospel
CREED: “I believe” Profession of faith.

MASS OF THE FAITHFUL

OFFERTORY ANTIPHON: Preparation for oblation (sacrifice)
OFFERTORY: Bread, wine, & hearts of people offered to God
SECRET: Prayer that the offerings are worthy
SANCTUS: “Holy, holy, holy” Canticle of the Angels
PRAYERS OF REMEMBRANCE: Prayer for the living
PRAYERS OF OFFERING: Petition for peace, deliverance, to get to heaven
CONSECRATION: Action of Christ. Bread=body, wine=blood
PRAYERS OF OFFERING: Recalls the old law sacrifices, remember Calvary
PRAYERS OF REMEMBRANCE: Prayer for the dead in purgatory
DOXOLOGY: All things sanctified & blessed through Cross of our Redeemer
PATER NOSTER: “Our Father” Preparation for Communion
BREAKING OF THE HOST: Imitates Savior who broke bread for the Apostles
AGNUS DEI: Christ is the Lamb from the Old & New Testament prophets
COMMUNION: The infinite God, in His infinite love, grants an infinite gift
POSTCOMMUNION: Prayer of thanksgiving for the Body and Blood
DISMISSAL: Priest dismisses the people, sends them out into the world
BENEDICTION: Priest humbly thanks God for allowing participation in sacrifice
LAST GOSPEL: Summary of the benefits we partake through Christ’s Sacrifice

Lux aeterna by Fr Lawrence Lew, O.P.
Via Flickr:
The splendid 19th-century reredos in Magdalen College chapel disappears into the gloom of the high Gothic ceiling, but the light illumines the altar during the celebration of the Requiem Mass for Reginald Cardinal Pole. So too, we believe that the Holy Mass dispels the darkness of sin and death and brings us closer to the light of God and the Mystery of Christ’s saving death and resurrection.

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The Order of the Traditional Catholic Mass

MASS OF THE CATECHUMENS

PRAYERS AT THE FOOT OF THE ALTAR: Priest adores God
INTROIT: “Entrance” Prayer to hasten God’s advent
KYRIE: Greek, A cry to the Trinity for mercy
GLORIA: Angelic Hymn, an exultation of praise
COLLECTS: Prayers of the day
EPISTLE: Letters and teachings of Apostles
GRADUAL: Psalm to unite prayers with instruction
ALLELUIA: Hebrew, “Praise the Lord”
GOSPEL: The words of Christ
SERMON: Explanation of the Gospel
CREED: “I believe” Profession of faith.

MASS OF THE FAITHFUL

OFFERTORY ANTIPHON: Preparation for oblation (sacrifice)
OFFERTORY: Bread, wine, & hearts of people offered to God
SECRET: Prayer that the offerings are worthy
SANCTUS: “Holy, holy, holy” Canticle of the Angels
PRAYERS OF REMEMBRANCE: Prayer for the living
PRAYERS OF OFFERING: Petition for peace, deliverance, to get to heaven
CONSECRATION: Action of Christ. Bread=body, wine=blood
PRAYERS OF OFFERING: Recalls the old law sacrifices, remember Calvary
PRAYERS OF REMEMBRANCE: Prayer for the dead in purgatory
DOXOLOGY: All things sanctified & blessed through Cross of our Redeemer
PATER NOSTER: “Our Father” Preparation for Communion
BREAKING OF THE HOST: Imitates Savior who broke bread for the Apostles
AGNUS DEI: Christ is the Lamb from the Old & New Testament prophets
COMMUNION: The infinite God, in His infinite love, grants an infinite gift
POSTCOMMUNION: Prayer of thanksgiving for the Body and Blood
DISMISSAL: Priest dismisses the people, sends them out into the world
BENEDICTION: Priest humbly thanks God for allowing participation in sacrifice
LAST GOSPEL: Summary of the benefits we partake through Christ’s Sacrifice

Monday, 30 September 2013

Monday, 30 September 2013

A Paradigm Shift In The Catholic Church

Something very big is happening in the Catholic Church, and it’s going on behind the scenes and underneath the radar. It’s happening in America, France, Britain, and in other places around the globe. This trend seems to be most evident in industrialised Western nations, but we can see traces of it starting to develop in the rest of the world as well. What we are witnessing is nothing less than a massive paradigm shift. Traditional liturgy is coming back, and the Traditional Latin Mass (Vetus Ordo or “Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite”) is leading the way.

The United States of America, like France and Britain, is a microcosm of this worldwide trend. Everywhere we look in the Catholic Church today, the news coming out about the Vernacular Mass (Novus Ordo or “Ordinary Form of the Roman Rite”) is becoming downright depressing. Parish attendance is down. The number of people who believe what the Catholic Church teaches is at an all time low. Many Catholic laypeople (particularly politicians) are in open rebellion against Church teaching. The number of new priestly vocations remain at an all time low, and of those few young men who do want to be priests, fewer still want anything to do with the Vernacular Mass (Novus Ordo). Most of them openly prefer the Traditional Latin Mass (Vetus Ordo), and would prefer to celebrate mass that way. The trend holds true in religious orders as well. A few traditional orders are flourishing, while the greater number of modernised orders are fading away.

Let me tell you, this traditionalist trend isn’t going to stop. It’s only going to get bigger, and my generation is just the tip of the iceberg. I’m not telling you to go to a Traditional Latin Mass (Vetus Ordo) if you don’t want to.  No, what I’m telling you to do is get your priest to start celebrating the Regular Vernacular Mass (Novus Ordo) like a Traditional Latin Mass. Tell him to follow the rubrics of the Vetus Ordo as best as he can, and start using incense, bells and chant again. Tell him, to make the new mass look just as much like the old mass as possible, but keep it in our vernacular language. Ladies, start wearing veils to mass again. Gentlemen, dress up accordingly. If you do this, I have a prediction to make. Your parish will grow again. The percentage of young families will increase in the pews. Parish baptisms will increase, confirmations and first communions will increase. The number of Protestant converts to your parish will increase. (See why here and here.) Last but not least, the percentage of faithful Catholics in your parish will increase. How do I know this? I know this because it’s already happening in a handful of parishes across the nation. It can happen in your parish too.

http://catholicozarks.blogspot.com/2013/09/a-paradigm-shift-in-catholic-church.html

Jesus can grant forgiveness and the power to forgive because he himself suffered the consequences of sin and dispelled them in the flame of his love. Forgiveness comes from the Cross; he transforms the world with the love that is offered. His heart opened on the Cross is the door through which the grace of forgiveness enters into the world. And this grace alone is able to transform the world and build peace.

–Pope Benedict XVI, Pentecost 2012 homily


Photo by Christopher M.: Fr. James Gordon praying the Holy Gospel at Mass.

anonymous asked:

Hello Father,

I was wondering if you could tell us a little about the "extraordinary form" of the Mass and what you thinks its place in the future of the Church will be?

The most visible change brought about by Vatican II (1962-1965) was the way the Mass was changed: It could now be celebrated in the vernacular (instead of exclusively Latin), the congregation began to participate far more actively, the altar was brought forward so that the priest faced the people, etc. The previous rite for celebrating Mass, found in the missals published between 1570 and 1962, had been undergoing slight modifications on a fairly regular basis, but nothing even remotely so drastic as what the fathers at Vatican II saw as necessary.

Since Pope Benedict’s 2007 letter Summorum Pontificum, we now refer to that Mass as the “extraordinary form of the Roman Rite,” whereas the Mass promulgated in 1970 that we’re all used to is called the “ordinary form.” The letter gave permission for the extraordinary form to be celebrated basically for whatever reason whatsoever when the faithful request it, within reasonable parameters of course, given the limited resources.

It’s a rather odd topic to have infighting about, but it’s unfortunately true that some Catholics can’t see the beauty and Catholicity of the old Latin Mass when it’s done right, and others can’t see the beauty and Catholicity of the new Mass when it’s done right. We really need to be able to see both: Abuses have unfortunately cropped up in both for different reasons, and that leads to some throwing out of babies with bathwater.

If I had answered this a couple weeks ago, I certainly wouldn’t have said the same thing about the future of the extraordinary form that I’ll sort of hint at now. The conventional wisdom had been that Pope Benedict had taken a rather unexpected step back towards the extraordinary form in order to smooth over the schism and/or hard feelings associated with the Lefebvrists and other tradition-minded Catholics, as well as to try to restore some solemnity to the everyday celebration of the ordinary form Mass through “cross-pollination.”

But then there was this in a recent National Catholic Register article:

Cardinal Kurt Koch, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, told reporters May 14 that the Pope’s long-term aim is not simply to allow the old and new rites to coexist, but to move toward a “common rite” that is shaped by the mutual enrichment of the two Mass forms.

Only time will tell what that could mean. It’s a very ambitious project, if the Pope’s true intention is really being expressed correctly here. If he’s allowed the necessary years and strength to carry it out, that could mean some very significant changes to the way we celebrate Mass eventually. Let’s see what God has in mind!

God bless you.

- Father Shane

Latin Mass info for your priest

Resources to learn the Traditional Latin Mass (information for priests.)

FSSP Training Video on Traditional Latin Mass (Part 1/3)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZUCa0pkPBhs

Part 1 of the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter’s Instructional Video on the Extraordinary Form for Priests and Seminarians.

Latin Mass Study - Fr Justin Nolan, FSSP  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_TNdD-o4SM

An educational walk through detailing exactly what the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass means followed by a Q&A session. Fr. Justin Nolan, FSSP also outlines the classical understanding of liturgical architecture.

The Latin Mass Explained and Demonstrated for Priests

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CHAGqlwLw6c

Instructional video with Professor of Liturgy Fr. Wolfgang Goettler created at the SSPX St. Thomas Aquinas Seminary featuring step-by-step instructions on the celebration of Low Mass. The tabernacle was left empty during this presentation so the priest could speak freely.

Important resources for Priest training:

http://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/the-mass/extraordinary-form/

http://www.sanctamissa.org/en/

http://www.fssptraining.org/

http://www.institute-christ-king.org/latin-mass-resources/latin-mass-training/

Link to playlist of 108 videos with Latin Mass information

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLlXDu0UptFAfwKH9Sz0yxRMvR3HVwmbp1

I forgot what I was gonna ask….oh ya what’s a rorate mass?
pipplesthepenguin

 Hello,

I can see you sent this question during Advent, and I am barely getting to it right now LOL. In the Extraordinary Form or Tridentine Mass, there is a Mass during Advent whose entrance antiphon, called “Introit” begins:

“Rorate caeli desuper et nubes pluant justum” or “Let the heavens sprinkle forth dew and the clouds rain down the Just One.” It is a prayer for the coming of Christ in His Incarnation said throughout Advent, but specifically was part of the Votive Mass of the Blessed Virgin for the season of Advent.

The tradition was to offer this Mass very early in the morning on Saturday, or other days of Advent, using all candlelight to illumine the sanctuary. Here is the Rorate Mass at St. Stephen’s in Sacramento, California–a parish of the Fraternity of St. Peter:

God bless and take care, 

Fr. Angel