extended trial

anonymous asked:

What is the path for a padawan to become a Jedi Knight? Is it age related? Their master's approval? There a test, yes? What does it look like? And what happens if they fail it? Are there any rituals or ceremonies? Cutting of the braid?

For a Padawan to become a Knight, they had to pass the Trials of Knighthood. These tests were administered by the High Council, to Padawans they believed to be ready. While age did not directly play a part in the Council’s decision to have someone take the tests, most Padawans were knighted in their twenties. The Master’s approval was not required, though I believe that they could recommend that their Padawan be tested.

During the Trials of Knighthood, a Padawan had to pass five trials: the Trials of Skill, Courage, Spirit, Flesh, and Insight. If deemed appropriate, the Council may have also substituted tests or waived them if the Padawan had shown the same qualities through their actions. For instance, both Anakin and Obi-Wan became Knights without participating in formal trials.

For the Trial of Skill, one must face a three-part assessment consisting of physical, mental, and combat challenges. The physical challenges were usually tests of strength, endurance, climbing, jumping and the like. The mental challenges were tests of levitation, another endurance test, duress and reflection. For the combat challenges, Padawans completed tests of conflict, duelling, and of the calm mind, and were required to face some sort of adversary. The individual or individuals they face would vary a lot, from holograms to droids to other students, or even the Temple Battlemaster or Grand Master. Some students may fight many opponents using many different weapons or altering the appearance of the chamber or their perception. While the tests largely consisted of physical feats, the Battlemaster looked more for the ability of a Padawan to use discipline and focus to avoid distraction. Anakin completed this trial when he defeated Asajj Ventress in combat.

Less is known about the Trial of Courage. In order for the test to work, the student must not know beforehand what they will face. Before the Golden Age of the Republic, courage on the battlefield or facing a Sith was considered a good way to pass the trial, but later tests were largely simulated. The Council could also send a student on a real mission; these missions had the potential to be deadly, which is why only students who are ready may participate in the Trials. When Obi-Wan defeated Darth Maul on Naboo, the Council considered that his Trial of Courage.

The Trial of the Spirit was a test of self-discovery. A Padawan entered a deep meditative trance and confronted their deepest fears and the darkness within themselves. Such deep meditation could be very dangerous, so a Master was always present to help guide the student back to the present. Unlike other tests, the High Council did not dictate what would happen and the student would have to decide what to do on their journey. This test had the potential to be highly traumatising, and some students would wake from a failed test inconsolable.

The Trial of the Flesh was considered the hardest test of the five, and it involved the Padawan experiencing great physical pain, loss, or hardship. In the earlier days of the Republic, the students were subjected to bursts of electricity applied directly to the skin, but this practice was abandoned. During the New Sith Wars, battle scars and lost limbs were often accepted as a way to pass the test. It was not uncommon for a Padawan to pass the Trials of the Flesh, Skill and Courage at the same time by defeating a Sith on the battlefield. Later, the separation of the Master-Padawan pair as the Padawan became a Knight was considered a hardship enough to pass the test, but during the Clone Wars it was once again common to pass through physical injury and loss.

The Trial of Insight was a test that required the Padawan to use the Force to see through deception. To pass, they were forbidden to study any possible challenges in the Archives, as they had to complete it themselves. The Trial sometimes took the form of riddles and puzzles, such as being required to solve the High Riddles of Dwartii. Other known scenarios are having to find one grain of sand among a field of rocks, or being faced with an army of holograms and forced to see through the illusion.

If a Padawan passed all these tests in one way or another, their Master would then prepare them for the Knighting Ceremony. If they failed, they had the opportunity to take them again until they passed. Before the ceremony, the student would meditate in the preparation room in the Tranquility Spire for a whole day. The next day, they would go up to the next level of the Tower, called the Hall of Knighthood. There, they would kneel in front of the Grand Master, the members of the High Council (if the High Council was unavailable, members of the other two Councils would step in), and other Jedi who were influential in the Padawan’s journey. The present Masters would ignite their lightsabers in a circle around the apprentice, and the Grand Master would lower their lightsaber to just above each of the student’s shoulders before severing their braid. The new Knight would then take their braid and leave the Hall in silence.

During Kanan’s knighting during a vision in the Lothal Jedi Temple, the words said were, “By the right of the Council, by the will of the Force, Kanan Jarrus, you may rise.” This may have also been said during more orthodox ceremonies, or another similar phrase.

Hopefully that’s helpful, and good luck!

~ Jacen

ok so I’m not completely sold on this theory myself but it’s been in my head for a while and I wanted to put it out there and see what people think.

tbs conspiracy theory: wadsworth is an atypical. her ability is in the same family as damien’s, although I doubt it operates on the exact same rules.

evidence: ep 25, dr bright “‘she [wadsworth] went up against a multiplier and talked all four of him down by herself!’”

ep 32, mark “director wadsworth was always trying to convince me of things that weren’t true… she would tell me that if I didn’t exercise my power, it would rot me from the inside out… And even though I know that isn’t true sometimes I still feel like my insides are gonna spill out through the top of my head.”

ep 33, dr bright “she was good at talking to the patients sometimes, at talking them down from a crisis, or talking them into something.”

ep 33, dr bright “she said it with such conviction you believed that anything really was possible.”

also ep 33, dr bright “and ellie got up in front of the entire conference room and essentially bullied headquarters into giving her 20 million more dollars and extending the trial by two years. By the time the brass left, they looked like they had been on a tilt-a-whirl.”

so, yeah. could just be that she’s very persuasive and manipulative (which we know she is) but I think there’s a decent amount of evidence for it being more that that.

anonymous asked:

Hey Ty! I was wondering if you could help me out...I've been dealing with a lot of self-doubt with my art. I'll be graduating next year, and I want to take the right steps to help me become a character/concept artist. Do you have any advice on ways to get my foot into the door or to boost my resume? I know it's pretty unrealistic to expect to get my dream job right off the bat. Do u think getting an internship or taking a year off to strengthen my portfolio/learn new programs will help? Tysm!

  • You’re at a point in your new career that I honestly think anything will help! Taking a year to study new programs and hone your skills is a great idea, but don’t give up the job search in that time either. One major tip for job searching is never to assume you’re not enough. If you gain more skills while you’re waiting for offers to bite, great, but never postpone sending your resume and portfolio to companies. You never know who will want you!
  • I mainly want to warn you against unpaid internships, especially at small shady companies. Companies with barely anything to show under their belt, a lot of times, seek recent college grads with good portfolios, hoping to use the promise of “exposure” to squeeze out free labor. Be careful of these!
    A stable company will offer money for an internship. Try your best to go for these positions instead, especially since paid internships are often investments from the company, like an extended trial period to see if you fit the company culture.
  • In a case where you end up doing free work, only do it with close friends and colleagues. These situations are generally for really powerful passion projects that you want to dedicate yourself to, like if you’re looking to Kickstarter or Steam for publishing your indie animations/games.
    This kind of free work I don’t suggest for you as a recent grad– since you learn a lot of pipeline and scheduling from an industry job– but it is an option if you have enough income from other sources, and definitely a safer and more fulfilling option than going for an unpaid internship
  • My other major piece of advice is to stay connected. I know networking is a hard thing to wrap your head around as a grad, but keeping in touch with your classmates, teachers, and friends is going to be one of the most important things for you. Keep your eyes open for see what your buddies are up to, you never know if your 3D modeling friend will be at a company that needs a concept artist! And these friends are the people who have seen your work and your attitude, they’ll know if the job is a good fit on a personal level.
  • And before I send you off into the world, remember to rest. Pursuing your career is great, but you just finished several years of uninterrupted working. Creating art, no matter how digital it is, requires physical activities that will effect you, and takes lots of mental energy that can drain you. So don’t forget to take breaks, stretch your wrists and back, and do other things with your life
  • Good luck!
Angela Merkel Blasts Turkey for Detention of Human Rights Activists
Berlin/Ankara: German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Tuesday blasted Turkey’s detention of six human rights activists, including a German, and pledged to work for his release.

One of those remanded in custody on suspicion of belonging to a terrorist organisation was Amnesty International’s Turkey director, Idil Eser. Amnesty said truth and justice had become “total strangers”.

Eser, the German Peter Steudtner and eight other activists were detained this month while attending a workshop on digital security near Istanbul.

A Turkish prosecutor asked a court on Monday to extend their detention pending trial on suspicion of links to the network of Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen, whom Ankara blames for last year’s attempted coup. The court ordered four of the 10 released, the newspaper Hurriyet said.

In unscheduled remarks at a ceremony for athletes, Merkel said the case was another example of innocent people being “caught up in the wheels of the justice system”.

She said Steudtner’s arrest was absolutely unjustified.

“We declare our solidarity with him and all the others arrested … the German government will do all it can, on all levels, to secure his release.”

The comments were likely to further strain ties between Berlin and Ankara. These are already beset by a host of issues including Ankara’s arrest of Deniz Yucel, a Turkish-German dual national who is a correspondent for the German newspaper Die Welt, on charges of spreading propaganda in support of a terrorist organisation and inciting violence.

“POLITICAL WITCH-HUNT”

Amnesty International’s secretary general, Salil Shetty, said the decision to keep six of the activists in detention “shows that truth and justice have become total strangers in Turkey”.

“This is not a legitimate investigation,” he said, “this is a politically motivated witch-hunt that charts a frightening future for rights in Turkey.”

In June, authorities detained Amnesty’s local board chairman, Taner Kilic, along with 22 other lawyers, also for suspected links to Gulen, who has condemned the coup attempt and denied any involvement.

Some 150,000 people have been sacked or suspended from jobs in the civil service, military and private sector and roughly 50,000 people have been detained since the coup.

Rights groups and some Western allies say Turkey is using the crackdown to quash all dissent. Opposition media outlets have been closed and around 160 journalists detained. Turkey is now the world’s biggest jailer of journalists, according to the New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists.

The government - which on Monday extended the state of emergency brought in after the failed putsch for another three months - says such measures are necessary because of the gravity of the security threat.

Steudtner’s friends, family members, and colleagues urged Turkey to release him immediately, saying in a statement that he and his Swedish colleague, Ali Gharavi, had been on an assignment for a development organisation.

my personal hc is that TP Zelda is incredibly pale since she never had much exposure to the outside world and lived in heavy isolation, etc. following her stoic and staid demeanor, it makes it a personal quest of Link to find out what’ll make her smile or remotely flustered. it takes an awful lot of trials extending to almost a year until he’s met with the most opaque blush you will ever see in Hyrule, on incident.

Met police move to roll out spit hoods in all London custody centres labelled 'primitive and extreme'

A decision to extend a trial use of spit hoods to all police custody centres across London has been labelled “primitive” and “extreme” by a human rights charity.

Following a “successful” initial trial of the controversial devices at five custody suits in north-east London, the Met has decided to extend the pilot across the capital.

The force said it consulted with “partner organisations, community representatives, independent groups and magistrates” before taking the decision.

But human rights charity Liberty accused the police of trying to “quietly” implement the hood “with no public debate and no published evaluation”.

The mesh hoods are put over the heads of detainees who are considered at risk of spitting at officers and possible passing on contagious infections.

They were at the centre of controversy last year when a man was filmed screaming as he was held down by British Transport Police officers who put a hood over his head.

The police watchdog is now investigating the case after Ik Aihie, 20, was released without charge.

Martha Spurrier, Director of Liberty, said: “The police do an important job, which is why they are able to use necessary and proportionate force.

“Spit hoods are neither – they are primitive, cruel and dangerous.

“There have been far too many cases of their use against children and disabled adults, causing huge fear, humiliation and even suffocation – which makes it all the more disturbing to see the Met quietly roll this extreme measure out across our city, with no public debate and no published evaluation.

“If the pilot was ‘successful’, why can’t we see the evidence?”

But the force claimed the spit guards are “effective, proportionate and necessary” when “deployed correctly and with appropriate supervision”.

A statement announcing the decision said: “The Met has a duty of care to its officers and staff - the issue of spitting and biting is a real problem and a particularly unpleasant form of assault which rightly generates a lot of concern amongst officers.

“Aside from the fact that as an employer the Met cannot expect its staff to be spat at, or think this is acceptable, some of the follow-up treatment required after such an assault can be prolonged and unpleasant.

“Spit guards are a nationally approved piece of police personal safety equipment and are already used by 22 forces across the UK.”

I think I’ve finally settled on this design for my Hera tattoo, with some face tweaks. I’ve been humming and hawing all day being absolutely useless, but it was the one that first made me go ‘ooh!’ (which obviously has nothing to do with it being the first one that I saw).

It’s also the one design that fits in best with my headcanon of Sabine painting a gorgeous Hera on the side of the Phantom when they’re stuck in downtime for a lengthy time - perhaps after an intense run, and she needs a long project to unwind and breathe, the paint flowing from her hand, roping out all of the stress and worry and confusion. Everything makes more sense in colour. Hera’s started sort of folding in on herself after so many extended trials and tribulations, to the point where even Kanan is struggling to find the cracks to get in, to find her. The Phantom is their place - Sabine’s and Hera’s - where they’ve shared and learned and that tentative wary trust solidified into a bond.

She doesn’t let anyone near the Phantom, setting up a portable shield to stop Ezra or Chopper from crashing through her paints in a tussle (the fact that Hera doesn’t notice and doesn’t call her on it speaks louder than anything else). When they finally get the all-clear to go back into the field - they’re off the radar and the heat’s cooled off - she insists on running all the pre-flight checks herself. Keep the surprise.

Of course Ezra and Zeb immediately come hurtling along, their argument (something about furballs in Ezra’s boots - Sabine rolls her eyes at their cabin fever) slamming to a halt as quickly as they do. As soon as Ezra opens his mouth Sabine shoots him a look that burns. Not a word. He snaps his mouth shut, and shares a grin with Zeb as the three of them wait with Chopper, grouped together in front of the shuttle’s nose (the perfect portrait).

Hera and Kanan walk towards the Phantom dock, Hera’s lekku low as they quietly go over the mission. Both of them frown at the suspiciously quiet and well-turned out group waiting for them, Kanan muttering a comment about the bad influence of the Alliance. Hera snorts, but her mouth barely lifts in a smile. Then, as though on cue, their crew parts and right there is Hera, captured perfectly but also so much more as she meets the viewers eyes, one leg kicking delicately up. Delicately, but easy enough to imagine a wayward Imp on the other end of that kick (or a suave entrepreneur).

Kanan stops, staring, mouth hanging wide with no memory of what air is. Hera, however, slowly walks towards the ‘fighter, her Lekku rising as she frowns. A wave of panic starts welling up inside Sabine - until she sees the smile tugging at the corners of Hera’s mouth. A smile she hasn’t seen in weeks, if not months.

‘Painting my ship, Sabine? And without asking. A bit risky, don’t you think?‘ Hera nods at the brand new nose art with an appreciative but serious eye before reaching out to squeeze Sabine’s hand as she heads into the ship, the others trooping along behind her. Sabine’s face glowing like the sun.

It takes Kanan three attempts to get into the Phantom.

(The clones, of course, are delighted when they see the Phantom. This hallowed tradition being carried on even in these uncertain times.)

(Eventually they have to remove it for reasons of secrecy, their captain’s face emblazoned on their starfighter somewhat ruining their anonymity. The discussion is overheard and Ahsoka an Alliance representative offers to transfer the art off so it can be preserved. The next time they rendezvous with the alliance, it isn’t until they’ve passed through three corridors and a rec room papered in posters featuring a green figure that the crew registers what they’ve seen. Hera is the newest face of Alliance top secret recruitment. Recruitment is way up.)

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The Scorch Trials Extended Clip - “The Escape”