experimenting in the classroom

Here’s the thing about being a professional who works with people in any kind of health or social care job:

We go through years and years of training. We are constantly urged to update our knowledge and skills. We amass knowledge in the hope it will service our clients well and ultimately we are driven by a strong desire to help people to improve their lives. We are often highly qualified, overworked and underpaid and I don’t believe I’ve ever met anyone who’s in it for the money.

But that does not make us unchallengeable “experts.” And it is dangerous for us to pretend that we have a more valid understanding of our client’s experiences than they have themselves.

If you look at the history of this sector, you can see that we’ve come a long way in a short time. It’s not that long ago that a lot more people were confined to asylums for no real reason. It’s not that long ago that people were put through countless painful operations in order to “improve” their physical disabilities, with no real consideration given to the person’s wishes. It’s still legal in most countries (everywhere except Malta) to operate on an intersex child without parental permission. Even in the early days of medicine, doctors set themselves up as “experts” and a lot of unsafe practice went unchallenged for decades as a result.

This sector has a dark history of abuse and the best professionals work with an awareness of this and a desire to avoid repeating those mistakes. Which means putting the clients’s experiences at the heart of everything, because when things are forced on people without their wishes being considered, that’s when it becomes abusive. You cannot work effectively with a person if you let your view of their situation override their own. My qualifications do not take precedence over first-hand experience.

Like a lot of allistic professionals, I was taught that “person with autism” is a preferable label to “autistic person.” To some extent, I can see there was good intent behind this. However, out of the classroom, most autistic people I’ve encountered disagree. So I have to defer to them, and if it’s uncomfortable to apply the same rule to everyone on the spectrum, I can simply ask people what they prefer. For me to presume that my classroom learning has more validity than the experiences of autistic people would be dangerously arrogant.

I’m not claiming to be the perfect professional or anything, but I am highly shocked when I see professionals on tumblr claiming that their professional knowledge is more legit than knowledge than comes from first-hand experiences. First of all, it’s highly unprofessional for you to be arguing about this in ALL CAPS WRITING on a social network. Secondly, all professionals have to be open to challenge. If an autistic person challenges you on your person-first language, hostility is a completely inappropriate reaction. As a professional, you have obligations that continue after you finish work for the evening. Respecting other people is the most basic one.

Medical School—A Not-So-Quick Walkthrough

Hey humans! Aunt Scripty here. This post is a submission by Brittany, whose Tumblr handle I surprisingly don’t know. This post came through the Submissions Box. If you’re interested, I encourage people to submit articles to appear on the blog! [though it may behoove us both if you message me first, as I have a few posts in-progress and I don’t want us to duplicate efforts]

Anyway, give Brittany some props! This is an awesome post, and I’m CRAZY thankful she wrote in! And now, Brittany, take it away!

Disclaimer: This applies to the American medical system only, and may be biased by the author’s experiences.  Also note that this is the process for becoming an MD, not a DO (both MDs and DOs are fully licensed physicians, but DOs have a stronger focus on the musculoskeletal system and their schooling is slightly different).

Disclaimer Part 2: I swear, this was SUPPOSED to be a brief post.  Oops.

The quick and dirty:

—4 years of undergrad

—4 years of medical school, 2 in the classroom and 2 clinical

—3-5 years of residency depending on what they specialize in.  Can be longer if they add subspecialties or fellowships.

The in-depth description:

Getting in (Premed student)

Acceptance to medical school is hard enough to start with.  There’s an estimate that 75% of applicants are qualified, but only 50% get in.  Your character doesn’t need to major in biology or pre-med, but there are pre-requisites: two semesters each of biology, chemistry, organic chemistry, calculus, and physics, plus a couple biology electives, and I think psych and statistics have been added on since I graduated, but don’t quote me on that.  That’s pretty much 2/3 of a science major right there, so you can see why a lot of people just end up with that.  During spring of junior year, they’ll take a giant standardized test called the MCAT that covers all of those topics and is notoriously difficult.

Along with the classroom work, they’ll have to get clinical experience—most commonly volunteering, shadowing, or working as a medical scribe, but you can get creative—and usually do a little research of some kind.  Med school is hard and being a doctor is harder; they want to know that you’ve got an idea of what you’re getting into.  If your character does all that right, they interview with medical schools during the fall of senior year, and hopefully get accepted!

Year 1 (MS1)

Your first year is classroom based.  You get daily lectures on very complicated medical topics, with relatively little patient interaction this year.  Schools will include more practical classes as well, including a cadaver dissection, pathology (where you train to look at cells and understand what a healthy vs. diseased one looks like; some schools are old school and have people still work with slides and microscopes, others like mine do it virtually), and standardized patient encounters (where they hire actors to come in and work with us so we can practice histories and physical exams and basically get a baseline on things like “what does a normal lung sounds like?”).

Patient interaction varies from school to school, but generally is pretty low.  You can shadow a certain specialty you’re interested in, volunteer in free clinics, join different clubs/interest groups, or do various electives that will focus on teaching certain aspects of patient care (nutrition, medical Spanish, global health, etc.), but you have to go look for them.  If I hadn’t done any of that, I would have seen maybe… two patients a month?  Most students will branch out with those other opportunities, though.

Year 2 (MS2)

Similar to MS1 in that you’re still on classroom duty, still not seeing many patients.  Typically you learn more sensitive physical exams this year (urological, gynecologic, breast, etc.), and you’re finished with the cadaver dissection, but things are otherwise the same.  At the end of your character’s MS2 year, they’ll take their first board exam, called STEP 1.  You can take it one time only unless you fail.  Low scores or a fail are really frowned on, and can limit the specialty your character goes into, so you can imagine the pressure.

Year 3 (MS3)

Yay!  Your character’s now ready to be let loose on the clinic/hospital!

Boo!  This year kicks. your. ass.

This year is all about making your character feel like an idiot putting what your character’s been studying for two years into action.  The schedule is broken up into rotations, which are periods of 4-8 weeks where students focus on a specific specialty each time.  These courses are: pediatrics, family medicine, psychiatry, ob/gyn, neurology (usually), emergency (sometimes), surgery, and internal medicine.  Difficulty varies by rotation, with surgery and ob/gyn being the worst (12 hour days with only one day off a week, max; surgery adds in occasional 24 hour shifts too, just to spice things up).  Occasionally you’ll land on a nice one, like psychiatry, with 10 hour days and free weekends.

On a more day-to-day level, third years are usually part of a small medical team that cares for a set of patients.  The team consists of an attending (fully licensed physician), residents (physicians who are training in their particular specialty), and medical students (MS3s and MS4s both).  MS3s will usually get a small subset of hospital patients they care for every day—take their histories, do their physical exams, list what you think they have, and suggest treatments/tests—but because you’re not licensed, you basically take all that to the attending/resident who hears you out and then says ‘yea’ or ‘nay.’  As the year progresses, hopefully you hear more ‘yeas’ and fewer ‘nays.’

At the end of this year/the beginning of 4th year, there’s another board exam called STEP 2.  Half is your typical multiple choice test, with a numeric score—much like STEP 1—while half is a pass/fail practical where you work with standardized patients.

Year 4 (MS4)

Hopefully by now your character has figured out what they want to specialize in.  I can go over specialties in another post if anyone’s curious, but the biggest ones are basically the same as the ones listed as core rotations during the MS3 year.  There’s a giant application/interview process that takes up the lion’s share of the summer/fall/winter for interviews with residency.  At the end of the process, everyone ranks the residencies they interviewed with from most to least favorite, and at the same time the residencies rank their interviewees from most to least.  The whole thing goes into a giant computer algorithm to give as many people as possible as high a choice as possible, and then on the same day of the year, at the same time, MS4s across the country take a deep breath and open envelopes saying where they ‘matched.’

In addition, with those pesky core rotations out of the way, the character has time to take electives that may or may not be applicable to their future specialty—me, I’m going for emergency medicine, so I’m doing several rotations in EM as well as EMS, but I’m also doing a two week course forensics because it sounds awesome.

Otherwise, 4th year is widely known as the ‘take a breath’ year.  People get married or have babies during this time, travel, and generally start to act like human beings again.  There’s space in your schedule that’s off—it’s generally intended for interviews or studying for STEP 2 if you’re taking it late, but people will use it for anything.

Residency

Not going to give too much detail about it, seeing as how your character is technically a doctor at this point, but residency is basically 3-5 years where your character trains in a specialty—yes, they’re physicians, but they don’t know everything about their particular field and need trained.  You’re in this weird limbo between student and employee; you make a salary (although a very low one considering the number of hours) and can prescribe medication, perform procedures, etc., but an attending is responsible for you, you still attend a weekly lecture, and you can’t practice independently.  To give you an idea of how hard these years are, they recently had to limit things like “don’t make residents work more than 36 hours in a row,” and “don’t put the doctor who graduated med school a month ago in charge of an entire floor of ICU patients for a night with no backup.”  Incredibly, some of the old-school attendings think said changes are a bad idea and will produce doctors who are “weak.”

Also, you thought your character was done with standardized tests?  You sweet summer child.  STEP 3 has to be finished before you can complete residency, and is usually done during intern year.  The good side of this is, you’re in a residency now, so as long as you pass, no one cares about the score.

Random notes:

—This is a sample timeline, following your ‘traditional’ student.  It’s becoming more and more common for people to take a couple of years off after undergrad and apply for medical school after that.  If you want a chance for your character to gain some non-medical life experience (travel, other skill sets, becoming a parent, etc.), this is a good chance for them to do it!

—I’ve been asked by a writer I know in RL how young someone could potentially become a doctor.  I think she wanted to put in a prodigy kind of person.  The problem with that is that medical schools don’t just look for smarts, they look for maturity—imagine having someone who looks like they can’t drink yet tell you you’ve got a terminal disease, and you can see why.  That said, there are a couple of accelerated programs, where I’ve seen people graduate undergrad a year early and go straight into medical school, or where they condense medical school into three whirlwind years because the person’s on track for a specific primary care residency.  So if most people graduate medical school at age 26-27, you could have someone out at 25 or maybe 24, but probably no younger.  And remember, they’ll still need residency training from there.

—Not gonna lie, medical school is incredibly difficult.  That said, I think the best students/doctors are the ones who maintain an outside interest or two, so don’t feel like your character can only have medical skills (*cough*Grey'sAnatomy*cough*) .  Give them a few side interests to maintain their spirit.

—I can give more detail about any and all of these if anyone asks; these are supposed to help you understand what your character has had to go through to be a doctor, not be a full detail spiel.  I can also do ‘day in the lifes’ if someone’s writing a med student character and wants an accurate description, but let’s be real: most people want to write the master, not the pupil.

10 tips for talking about news, politics and current events in schools

Animation by TOGETHER

In schools everywhere, students are deeply affected by current events. Certain policy changes and related commentary can cause children to experience fear, confusion and anxiety. For example, some kids might fear deportation. Others might be upset about hurtful generalizations they hear regarding their cultures and countries of origin. A lot of kids might fear the loss of rights.

Teachers around the world have shared that having conversations about these topics is challenging, and sometimes they end up avoiding these conversations altogether. So how might teachers facilitate a classroom discussion that allows students to express their perspectives and work through their emotional distress? It’s important to note that an emotionally charged conversation requires a different set of skills than leading an academic class discussion. Here are 10 tips for success:

Animation by @rewfoe

1. Come up with class norms. It is hard to have a spontaneous conversation about a controversial issue. Classroom procedures for conversations and discussion can help your conversations go smoothly. At the beginning of the school year, establish guidelines for class discussions with your students’ input. What are the qualities of a good listener? How can students feel heard and understood? What happens if someone becomes overly emotional? Post the guidelines in your classroom, review them periodically, and stick to them during discussions. If you have guidelines in place, students won’t feel singled out if you have to give them feedback about their style of participation.

2. Make sure everyone has the same basic background information. Not all students are politically minded or have access to news media. Before starting a class conversation, provide a basic summary of events. Students are less likely to tune out if they understand what the conversation is about.

3. Provide explanations and clarifications. Sometimes students’ emotions are rooted in confusion, fear, and misinformation. Students look to teachers for information and clarification, so don’t forget your role as an information source. Even if you don’t have an answer, you can search for it alongside your students. If fake news seems to be at the root of the problem, empower your students to evaluate news sources. PBS has an excellent lesson plan for that here.

Animation by TOGETHER

4. Avoid debates. There will likely be a variety of viewpoints in your classroom. Debates can be a constructive activity in the context of an organized, structured lesson. Yet when students are emotionally charged, debates can often devolve into arguments and personal attacks. Shift the focus from changing minds to exchanging ideas. Frame the conversation as an opportunity for understanding and empathy.

5. View yourself as a facilitator. If you view yourself as a facilitator, you can provide a comfortable space for students to express themselves and develop their own opinions. Your role is not to persuade students of a particular point of view. Instead, you are providing a safe, structured space for students to work through a specific topic.

Animation by @rewfoe

6. Reflect what you hear and encourage students to do the same. Simply repeating back what you hear can be tremendously helpful. It can help students understand their emotions and thoughts about particular issues and events and it can help deescalate emotionally charged situations by showing that you have heard and understood your students. Model this technique for your students and encourage them to repeat back what they have just heard before they respond to a classmate.

7. Provide space for students to experience their feelings. If students are experiencing strong emotions, that is OK. Oftentimes, adults try to cheer kids up when they are angry or sad. This can send the message that they need to suppress their emotions so that the people around them aren’t uncomfortable. Acknowledge their emotions and encourage classmates to do the same. When students judge each other’s emotions with comments like, “You have no right to feel that way,” encourage them to recognize the emotion of their classmate instead. Remind them that people do not all have exact same experience. When you establish your classroom norms, this can be an important point to cover. Brene Brown’s video resource on empathy can help show the importance of allowing others to experience their emotions.

Animation by TED-Ed

8. Provide time for independent reflection. Give students some time to write (or create an audio file, drawing or other product) independently so that they have a chance to process the conversation. Let students know that this isn’t a graded assignment, and that you are open to feedback about ways to improve the classroom discussion.

9. Check in with distressed students. If a student is particularly anxious or upset, check in with that student privately. If you are worried about a student, avail yourself of other resources in your building and district so that students get the support they need to function well during the school day.

Animation by Cinematic Sweden

10. Consider a class project related to the discussion. A class project can help build cohesion and a sense of community in your classroom. It can also show that even in the midst of controversy and disagreement, people can work together for a common goal. The project does not have to be complicated or expensive. For example, TED-Ed Innovative Educator Kristin Leong created Roll Call, a project that highlights the commonalities between students and teachers.

Author bio: Dani Bostick is a writer, teacher, and TED-Ed Innovative Educator in Virginia.

8

I’m teaching a Film Workshop Class over at Calarts this year, and my students asked to see some of my work from Clarence.

I wanted to make it a teaching experience so I broke down the opening moments of “Classroom” and explained the thought process behind some of the shots used.

NOTE: I can’t take full credit for this! This is the final timing board, so a lot of the drawings have been cleaned up/revised by our wonderful revision team and a some jokes have been added by directors! 

In feeling that college au life right now

-Candela stress cleans. Her dorm was spotless the days leading up to finals because all she could do between studying was aggressively dust and vacuum.
-Blanche’s side of the room is a fucking mess, but they’re desk is always neat, so they can work at it. Spark’s side of the room is neat, but their desk is a fucking mess. Law of Equivalent Exchange.
-Candela’s siblings come to visit her on a daily basis. Her younger brother is starting college next year, so he likes to stay overnight some weekends, so he can have the College Experience™ before actually going to college.
-Spark once heard one of his classmates talking about how hot Professor Willow was once. He swears he threw up a little.
-Professor Willow is a ratemyprofessor favorite. He doesn’t use the textbook. He does a ton of experiments in the classroom. The tests are easy. His projects are fun. Literally, everybody takes his class for the Natural Science requirement.
-Going home is literally so weird for Spark because his house is always full of his dad’s friends, aka all of his professors.
-Willow would never admit it, but he keeps tabs on Spark’s academic progress and tries to convince professors to increase Spark’s grade when he’s not doing so well. Nobody has agreed to raise Spark’s grade.
-Willow’s the type of professor you see Day Drinking in the parking lot before class starts.
-Willow’s the kind of professor that will let you call him “bro.”
-A female student once heard Spark call Willow “Dad,” so she accidentally called him “Daddy” the next time she spoke to him. She doesn’t raise her hand in class anymore.
-Spark has called Willow “Daddy” in front of his class. Spark had to clarify that Willow was his real actual father.

Sk8er Girl Ch 3 (Trixya) - Squeaky Pink

Trixya!HS AU. Trixie is a nerdy, girly girl with bows and frills. Katya is a skater chick with scuffed knees and a flazeda attitude. When they’re assigned as lab partners, can they discover chemistry together?

Or: She was a sk8er girl. She said see you later girl. She wasn’t good enough for her (or was she?).

[AN: Pink Shrooms aka Squeaky Pink. We’re writing this together but alternating chapters and POVs. Pinky is mainly Trixie’s POV and Squeaky is mainly Katya’s POV. The first part of this chapter very heavy and /real/ but the ending is fluffy cuteness to make up for it!]

Keep reading

HOW TO: Be a Theatre Student

1. ATTITUDE

The most common negative quality in Theatre Students is a lack of appreciation. There are so many individuals in this world who feel forced into career paths that have nothing to do with their true passion. We are so lucky to be allowed to follow such a unique dream, and to bring joy to so many audiences. Remember even when completing difficult assessments, or doing back to back late nights, we are working towards something bigger. Being appreciative and passionate is an inspiring quality. Embody this. 

2. TUTORS

We are extremely lucky in my course to be taught by a group of working Professionals, not Lecturers. Although you will spend every day with them, remember they are Professionals who deserve respect. They will be your most valuable resource. Do not waste their time. Ask questions. Drink in all that you can. They will know you better than you know yourself. Theatre Professionals in the Industry do not have time to stop mid-show and explain their decision making. Working with such people is an amazing privilege. Use it. 

3. OBSERVE

As well as observing the Tutors methods, also observe the other students around you. Before screaming about how much potential you have, take time to watch other students succeed and fail. Take from their methods the aspects you want to incorporate into your own practice. Never ignore the potential of those sitting next to you to have incredible ideas. 

4. OPPORTUNITIES

Theatre School will immerse you in an environment of external opportunities. My school offers a variety of non-assessed events that we can volunteer to work on. We are also able to be hired as Venue Technicians for weekend work. I would highly recommend using these as platforms to practice your craft and keep you fresh. This will make you a known face around campus, and give you extra experience your peers may not have. It’s easy to get stuck in the classroom. Remember you are here for live art! 

5. EVERY DAY IS AN INTERVIEW

Every day we are surrounded by current and future industry professionals. Although you should feel safe to make mistakes, know that the way you act now is being constantly monitored and will be remembered. Try to handle stressful situations with grace, and always have an air of professionalism about you. People in theatre are good judges of character. Think quickly, and be respectful.

6. STAGE MANAGERS ARE TIME KEEPERS

You are completing a Stage Management course. A Stage Manager’s first job is to be a time keeper… So meet your goddamn deadlines. Seriously. There is nothing that makes Tutors cringe more than seeing Students getting extension after extension when they are training to be a professional organiser. Your ability to stay on top of work, even that unrelated to productions, is being judged as part of your work ethic. Although sometimes it is overwhelming, remember this time of your life will end and you DO have the ability to complete the work in good time. Write the essay. Read the play. It will get you one step closer to theatre.  

7. TEACHING OTHERS TEACHES YOU

Although Theatre School can sometimes be a competitive atmosphere, it is important to remember that teaching others actually teaches you. I do my best learning when I have to explain concepts or procedures to someone who doesn’t understand them. Although sometimes you want to keep your knowledge close to your chest, be generous with your learning. It will consolidate the knowledge in your mind, and doing favours for others does not go unnoticed.

8. LET OTHERS FAIL

You also need to find your own moral ground on when to stop pulling friends across the line. As with any Degree, at the end of the day you need to all individually be capable enough to walk into a theatre and create a Prompt Copy, or set up a console. Don’t do all the work for people who aren’t interested in learning for themselves. Sometimes it takes a blown system or poor grade or yelling Director to wake a Student up. Ensure your work is always  high quality, but it is not your responsibility to manage any other work load. Do not get walked all over. This education is yours.

9. STOCK UP

Use this time to Stock Up! Create useful templates and file them nicely for you to use once you’re in the Industry. Buy a Stage Management Kit, and begin slowly stocking up throughout your time at University. Invest in the Tools you deem most useful. Buy the Stage Management book you keep reading from the Library. Collect the elements you want to be a part of your professional practice. This is the perfect time to gather resources. Do not waste it.

10. DON’T GIVE UP YOUR LIFE

The best advice I received at the commencement of my First Year was to not give up your personal life for a 9.00AM-6.00PM Monday to Friday course. I was ready to give everything away. I moved out of home to be closer to the city, worked through my weekends, and over the year stopped caring about my friends, family and other interests (including this blog!). Let me tell you, this does not get you ahead in your career. It left me lonely, and vulnerable to toxic relationships that I didn’t need. You need a well balanced life and support system to be good at your job. You need to be healthy and happy to inspire passion in those working for you. My best work of the year was during my November production, once I had realised this the hard way. Make an effort with your friends, stay with your family, have other hobbies that make you happy. Don’t throw your life away just because you got an acceptance letter. If this career is going to sustain your whole life, it needs to fit into your whole life. Theatre is not the only beautiful thing in this world. Just look around. You might surprise yourself. 

Best of luck to the 2017 First Years in all the kickass Theatre Courses around the world. I’m here for every single one of you! 

Ella X

Mine - Bellamy Blake Imagine (Part 3)

Author’s Note: this one’s pretty lengthy but felt like I couldn’t split it up, so really sorry it’s so long!

Originally posted by halcyonbellarke

Reader x Bellamy Blake

Word Count: 1,827 words

Warnings: minor swearing

You can read part 1 of this story here (Soulmates)

You can read part 2 of this story here (Rescuer)

The walk back to Camp Jaha was a struggle. You hobbled against Bellamy the whole way, even though he persisted he carry you. You tried to look at the earth around you but your body neglected the movement.

You felt the eyes, boring into your presence. You could only imagine what they were thinking. They only bought back one girl? Where is everyone else? You kept your eyes downcast, you couldn’t bare to look at anyone.

Abby Griffin was the first one to rush to your aid. “I know you. Telsa station, right?” She asks and you just nod, you couldn’t bare to speak.  "Anymore survivors?” She looks towards Bellamy. He slowly shakes his head, and you look away. “She came down on Factory. No other survivors, heaps of supplies.” He replies. “We’ll worry about that later, we need to get you to medical. Jackson!” She yells and Jackson rushes out with a wheelchair.

Every bone in your body ached and as Bellamy helped lower you into the chair. There was a feeling you couldn’t describe, but you just wished he would follow you. He was right behind you. Lagging a few paces just to catch up with his sister, but after that he stopped following and there was a heaviness on your heart.

Keep reading

School AU Prompts (based on my experiences)

* “A bird flew into the classroom and our teacher who is very afraid of birds is screaming and diving behind us to seek shelter” au

* “We’re playing field hockey and you hit the ball so high that it hits me in the face, but I’m fine and keep playing and two minutes later you’re screaming at the blood on my face and oh that’s unfortunate” au

* “We both have transparent rulers and we’ve never spoken before but you find this to be the perfect opportunity to start talking to me. Really? This of all things? Matching rulers?” au

* “You asked me if I was emo and Christ, that’s the third time I’ve been asked that today *deeply inhales* BOI” au

* “I have a love for learning French and am determined to be the top student but your first language is closely related to French, so the subject comes naturally to you bUT YOU SLACK OFF AND NOW WE HAVE AN UNSPOKEN RIVALRY” au

* “I’m not athletic and get nervous real easily so instead of participating in gym, I keep scores. While your team switched places in volley ball you whisper to me to sneak your team a couple points and I’m too awkward to realize it was a joke and you have to stop me” au

* “You’re the top student in chemistry, but you often get lazy on homework and I’m failing, but when the teacher says I was the only one to have a perfect score on a test, we all get a taste of your petty side” au

* “I blank out during a test, but you mistake it for me not knowing the answer so you whisper the answers to me. I thought I was hearing things, but I hover my pencil over the letter you suggested and you whispered ‘yes that one’ damn I’m gonna ace this” au

* “We have an assignment to write a bunch of poems in English class and I got too into it, so you gawk at my four page poems making me uber uncomfortable” au

* “I know jack shit about this subject, but I’m well versed in random 80’s pop culture, so when our nostalgic teacher tries to make references so we can understand the material, I’m the only one who gets them and you think it’s because I failed the subject so many times that I lived through the references” au

* “I have my head leaning on my fist and crack my knuckles against my chin, but you can’t figure out where the noise is coming from and I have to hide my laughter.” au

* “I started daydreaming and forgot to pull out my work, so the teacher asks me about it and I panic saying it’s already finished. You and your friends start getting loud, so the teacher points to me and says to follow my example and don’t you give me that look” au

* “You teach me phrases in sign language, so when you start talking during a lecture, I sign to you to stop talking because I didn’t want to be caught talking and somehow I’m still the one who got in trouble” au

* “You start off singing 'let it go’ really quietly and progressively get louder until you’re standing and doing the moves and- wait, now you’re sassily walking out the door and is the teACHER SERIOUSLY JUST GONNA LET YOU LEAVE?” au

* “Another fight broke out and a rumor started that it was over buttpads and you keep reminding people. It’s my third class of the day and I SWEAR TO GOD IF I HEAR THE WORD 'BUTTPAD’ ONE MORE TIME” au

* “You just waltz into the band room where me and all my friends hang out in the morning and offer to read a fanfiction you wrote about two of the teachers” au

* “I misspoke and accidentally said something that sounded like a pimp name so I shouted 'if anyone is in need of a pimp name, I just came up with one’ and without missing a beat, you said 'your offer intrigues me’” au

* “I stuttered over my words and accidentally said something really bad and you were the only person who I could convince to punch me and now you feel really bad, it’s okay, my bruises heal quickly, I had it coming, here’s three dollars” au

* “I have nothing to do until play practice which is hours later, so I hide in a storage closet and you’re the one to find me while searching for your tuba” au

* “You think you’re some fancy salesman, selling useless car parts and junk from the streets, but hey I guess the jokes on me, I bought an antique, broken street light glass off you for fifty cents and now I have to carry it around all day, using it as a paper weight” au

* “We share the same birthday and I sit directly behind you in class and one of your friends says 'happy birthday’ to you and now every. single. person is now wishing you a happy birthday, including the TEACHER and not a soul says it to me I MEAN SERIOUSLY THEY ANNOUNCED BOTH OUR BIRTHDAYS ON THE LOUD SPEAKER THIS MORNING” au

* “The teacher is speaking with someone and we hear them point out that we’re the only two people with curly hair in the class and you turn to me and say 'there can only be one’” au

* “We both have a cold and have to sniffle frequently, and we accidentally got the whole class sniffling as a joke and- hey buddy, you started it” au

* “I’m quiet in chorus but when we have a concert with my favorite song as a piece, I make myself HEARD and after the concert you compliment me and say I should sing louder more often and dammit, I shouldn’t fall in love with everyone who’s nice to me” au

BONUS:

* “You’re the lead in the school musical and I work backstage, but it’s my first time and I’m nervous so I call a friend, but you take my phone from me and start saying ridiculous (but hilarious) things to them like its nothing and… hm, I’m not so nervous anymore” au

* “You’re vocally homophobic, but only to impress your conservative friends because you’re scared they’ll leave you, but when we were in kindergarten, I had a crush on you and we kissed on the playground, and I recently came out as trans, so I just have this blackmail on you that you kissed a boy, just try me fucko” au

teaching special education gives me (and a ton of people of varying trustworthiness) the ability to label students with learning disabilities and long-lasting identifiers based on my experiences with them in the classroom and my interpretation of achievement test results.

I believe most special education teachers take this responsibility seriously, yet *how* their beliefs manifest - and the impact of their actions hold real consequences.

It’s just something I constantly think about as we have regular meetings, regularly fill out paperwork and make decisions that affect children’s lives. A child may have high needs or require an “it takes a village” mentality to provide them the services they deserve, but I’ve seen so many instances where the biases and privilege of an individual teacher greatly impacted the type and quality of of interventions the child received.

So much more work needs to be done. especially when it comes to students of color with higher needs.

@firebyfire here you go, sweetheart. It’s a slight bit different, but you will get clumsy Newt swooning over hot Graves. I promise that.

I thought it will be a short one. It’s not. lol

  • I’ve seen you several times around uni and every time you’ve seen me tripping over something I swear it’s not because I’m swooning at how hot you are 

Newt heard a lot of things about the new assistant of Anatomy professor. He usually didn’t really care about people, about how they look or what they wear. He was listening to what they talk about. And well, that narrowed his attention to the grumpy old professors and their lessons.

He was perfectly fine with that kind of student’s life and often was simply ignored by his fellow group mates. Oh, they tried to socialize with him, inviting him along when they went somewhere to have fun, but Newt wasn’t good at socializing. He always tended to annoy people, so he stopped trying a long time ago.

The first time he saw Mr. Graves was like watching some sloppily made introduction to a porn film. He watched few, alright? Just to experiment stuff, don’t judge him. So, Mr. Graves entered the classroom, pacing like a fucking model in front of them and stopped by the professor’s desk to tell the old man something.

Newt’s eyes didn’t know where to look seriously. He didn’t see anyone ever before who will think of as an attractive person. There was a lot of whispering between his mates but he paid them no attention, because Graves was going back and their eyes just met? And Newt’s hand jerked dropping the pencil he held. So, he naturally went down, under the desk to search for it, only to unceremoniously bang his head when he wanted to stand up. He got out eventually, not without a dull pain in his skull, but Graves was already gone and he dreamily sighed for the rest of the lesson, which he didn’t find as interesting as five minutes ago.

The second time he saw Mr. Graves was when he had his lunch at the cafeteria, the next Wednesday. Newt sat silently at his usual spot, near the window, munching on his favorite sandwich and reading through his report. Whenever he had something to work on, he would do that, but when he didn’t, he would just look out of the window and admire the nature. The spot had such a beautiful view and he was shocked that no one took it. Maybe other students were too busy gossiping and chatting with their friends.

A low hum made Newt raise his eyes from the paper he was reading. Mr. Graves sat at a table in front of him, and thank God, he was with his back at Newt, because Newt couldn’t trust his face at the moment. Mr. Graves was probably eating something really delicious, judging by the appreciative sounds he made.Newt’s face turned red and he couldn’t really breathe… because he was literally choking on his sandwich. He tried to swallow, tears forming in his eyes. After seconds of struggling, and he genuinely thought he will die, the bite of food went down his throat and he started coughing violently. Several persons watched him with worry, including Mr. Graves. Why no one gave him the attention when he almost died moments ago?

Mr. Graves was faster than his thought process, and no, he’s not stupid, he’s the smartest on his course, his mind was clouded by this man- and gave him a glass of water - his glass, as Newt noted - encouraging him to drink it up while soothingly rubbing his back. Those big hands felt so warm, even through the fabric of his sweater and Newt wanted to feel them on other parts of his body, everywhere to be precise, but Mr. Graves withdrew his hand much sooner than Newt would prefer to. When he tried to thank him, Newt stuttered and blushed such a deep shade of red, he didn’t need to see himself in a mirror to feel how hot his cheeks grew. Graves smiled at him, and God, the man was clearly trying to kill Newt, because what he was doing to redhead’s heart?

With a short nod, the man sat back at his table and resumed eating his lunch. Newt buried his face into his papers, trying to focus on them and not on the muscles flexing on Graves’ hands as that brought the spoon to his mouth.

When the Wednesday came around again, Newt sat restless through all of his lessons in hope to catch a glimpse of his crush- oh. He was crushing on Mr. Graves. This… wasn’t so bad, if he thought about it. Half of the university was crushing on him. It felt like crushing on a celebrity or something along those lines, because if he was being serious, he had no chances. Where was Mr. Graves and where was he?

Thinking about how his love life will never actually exist, he walked through the almost empty corridors, leading to the library. He loved to spend his free time in there. The dorms weren’t exactly a place where you can relax, study or read something. At least his roommate was just the silent type as he was, something he could not quite attribute to their neighbors on both sides.

The smell of books, paper, ink and dust drew a fond smile out of him and Newt walked through the endless aisles in search of that book he wanted to check out some time ago. Spotting the needed row, he went directly for the place he saw the book the last time at. Just, it wasn’t here. His smile turned into a pout as his eyes searched for something else to occupy his mind with.

A small chuckle caught his attention and he turned his head in that direction, only to come face to face with the book he looked for. The book moved out of his vision and its place took a familiar handsome face of assistant Graves.

“You wanted to read this one?“ the man asked, his lips quirking up at Newt’s stuttered greeting. Newt nodded frantically, not trusting his mouth anymore and desperately trying to avoid eye-contact.

“You can take it then.“ Graves said, shoving gently the book into Newt’s trembling hands. Newt’s eyes widened and he actually looked up.

“Why?“ was his simple question and it made Graves smile

“Well, it would be rude to not give the student the opportunity to learn, even if it’s…“ his eyes were focused on Newt’s as he murmured, his voice becoming deeper “Captive Prince.“

Newt wanted the floor to crack and swallow him completely. He did want to read it, because he was a bit curious. Especially after seeing how the girls won’t shut up about how hot it is.

He didn’t observe when Graves invaded his personal space and practically shoved his body into the books behind, his hands blocking any ways to escape and his body dangerously pressing onto Newt’s as he whispered

“Newton Scamander, I would like to ask you to stop blushing so cutely whenever you see me, because I swear to God, I’ll do…“ Graves leaned and kissed him hard, and fiercely, passionately even. “this.“ He finished, his eyes devouring Newt’s swollen, wet lips.

Newt watched him through his lashes, his brain empty all of a sudden and lips burning. Maybe his mind was clouded again, but there was one thing he was sure of. He didn’t mind Graves doing that again. And even more. So, Newt just silently claimed Graves’ lips in a sloppy kiss. He was clumsy here as well, but he hoped that Graves will teach him how to do things properly from now on.

Friends! Romans! Countrymen! 

I’m a qualified English and History teacher with a Bachelor of Education who can help you fulfil your academic dreams! Or at least your dreams of not having to read over the start of your essay ten times in a row because you have no idea where it’s going. 

For $20 USD, you have the benefit of my experience,  not only at university and in professional environments, but also at teaching classrooms full of unruly children! 

The services I can provide are as follows:

  • Essay proofreading for grammar and sentence structure issues.
  • Understanding university readings/help with important phrases and how to take comprehensive and cohesive notes.
  • A crash course in writing a coherent essay from start to finish, including planning! 
  • Proofreading a short creative writing story and providing narrative insight or help fill in a plot hole that just won’t leave. (fandom or original, it doesn’t matter}
  • Assessment structure help, including but not limited to: informal and formal essays, lab reports, opinion pieces and other assessment structures not listed here. 
  • Resume and cover letter help. I swear it’s not as hard as it sounds. 
  • Paragraph structure and essay question comprehension assistance. 
  • A lot of other shit!

You can choose to have one of the following, with prices negotiable: 

  • One hour of skype time (or messenger of your choice) with me, either written or video, with notes I will give to you at the end so we’re both on the same page, literally and figuratively.. (email me your documents beforehand at monsterbones@protonmail.com so we both have access to them)
  • email exchanges! (up to five from you, and five from me. That’s ten entire emails!) If you send me paragraphs you’re having issues with/are worried about sentence structure and grammar, I can go over that with you. 
  • A complete essay/assessment plan, including dot point notes that we can do together! You won’t get lost writing your assignment again..

Either email me at monsterbones@protonmail.com or contact my ask box, and we can set something up. 

Reblogs/signal boosts appreciated. 

Konoha Academy has flat screens mounted on the wall. Does that mean they didn’t have to suffer thru the squeaky wheeled tv stand-era?

Did any kid have to experience the simultaneous joy but fear upon seeing that stand in the classroom when you walk in? Wondering if it meant a looooong boring film you had to take notes on, or maybe there was a substitute teacher who was gonna slap in a tape of Bill Nye??! (bill! bill! bill!)

Advice For Student Teachers (From The “Other Side”)

I started this Tumblr when I *was* a student teacher.  Now, for the first time, I *have* a student teacher!  Both experiences taught me a lot, and, as a “mentor” teacher, I’ve been reflecting on what I would pass on to other soon-to-be-teachers. 

Put in the Hours

Come early, stay late.  That’s the life of a teacher, and it’s best to start experiencing it now. Teaching is a lot more than just what happens when the kids are around.  I know you have class and assignments, and those are a priority.  But so is getting as much time and experience as possible with the kids and in the classroom.  

Be Professional

I student taught at a “jeans and a t-shirt” kind of school, but I dressed more formally than the teachers.  It’s always OK to be the most dressed up and never OK to be the least dressed up.  Think of every day almost as a job interview.  Show respect to the rest of the staff: introduce yourself to the principal, specialists, office staff, janitor, etc.  Get to know the children’s families.  If the school allows it, volunteer to help with a few little things around the school.  Just from a practical side, it’s helpful to be “known” around the school when it comes time to try to find a job.

Ask Questions

It has taken me years to realize that a lot of the “magic” you see when you watch a good teacher is really the result of a million different deliberate decisions.   “Study” your classroom by taking the time to ask your teacher why and how she does things.  If you notice she’s especially great at guided reading, ask her to break down exactly how she does it, how she learned to do it that way, and why she makes those choices.  Otherwise, observing good teachers is kind of like going to a museum: impressive, but near impossible to duplicate.

Make Mistakes…

This is your time to have a “safe space” to experiment with learning how to teach.  Design a cool lesson or try something new even if it has the chance to fail.  You now have the benefit of a lead teacher backing you up.  It’s OK if everything does not go smoothly every time: people understand that you are still a STUDENT.

…But Be Honest and Reflective About Your Mistakes

When something does go wrong, really take the time to reflect on why it went wrong.  Seek out what you could do to do better next time.  If your lesson flops, don’t try to save face by saying, “Oh yeah it was fine.”  Talk openly about what you saw happen and what you need help on.

Ask For Help

The last two points bring me to this one.  ASK your teacher for help and guidance!  That is what she is there for.  Come in the morning with a few things you really want to work on, and get pointers.  I’m sure she is busy too, but I’ve never met a cooperating teacher who does not want to give advice.

You Can Be Critical, But Stay Respectful

There’s a good chance your teacher will not do things exactly how you would do it.  Heck, I’ve seen lots of AMAZING teachers, but I have never met one I would exactly copy.  It’s ok to think and reflect on what you would do differently, but remember that your cooperating teacher opened up her classroom and space to you and probably does do many things well (even if they are her way).  There may be times when you’ll have to manage the classroom or teach a lesson her way.  It’s OK.  You’ll have many years of doing it YOUR way! 

Enjoy The Experience, And Stay Positive

Student teaching can be a really amazing experience.  You get to spend your days with students and finally start to become a “teacher.”  But like many things, it’s what you make of it.  You’re also likely juggling work and school and having those days where you feel overwhelmed and like a failure.  Do everything you can to see the good in it.  Come into the classroom excited to see your teacher and the students.  I’ve seen a few student teachers who are so negative that everyone asks, “Why do they even want to become a teacher?”  Their attitudes can pull down the whole classroom.  Work to put on a smile and positive energy even when you’re feeling “down” (this skill will come in handy when you have your own class, too!).

ok, so I didn’t want to say anything until I had something to show for it… but I’m trying to get into designing patterns (eventually to sell, but not confident enough for that yet). I have a lot of ideas (for a couple different crafts in fact, this one just happens to be cross stitch), and some of them are for completely original stuff, but to start w/ (especially to get the hang of it) most of them are going to probably be anime related for a while.

So here’s the completed cross stitch of my first totally made from scratch pattern (that snake and clover one had elements scavenged from existing free patterns and rearranged, so yeah..). I wanted to start w/ something relatively simple and w/ only two colors, so this seemed appropriate. It’s the character Koro-sensei from the anime Assassination Classroom. ..or at least it’s the stamp he uses as a type of signature on his poem about tentacles in episode 1.

I am eventually going to iron and frame it (since it’s a round design I made it so it will fit in a 7″ embroidery hoop), but I couldn’t help but want to take a photo of it after I finished it last night. If I ever made it again I’d probably want to tweak a few things, but for my first one it’s not bad, and it was a good learning experience.