experiment ale

anonymous asked:

Hey! Ich waHey! Ich war der anonyme Ask über Talkshows, danke nochmal für die super Tipps :) Ich wollte nur kurz sagen, wie schön ich die Liebe von Klaas zu dieser Albumcover-Brillenkatze-Geschichte finde. Er ist ja ganz begeistert und entzückt von der Einfachheit und unironischen Niedlichkeit von Jokos Humor :D (1/2)

Gerne! Freu mich immer, wenn ich Leute von Joko und Klaas begeistern kann 😄❤️

Ja, die Geschichte ist wirklich süß!!
Da sieht man auch mal wieder wie unterschiedlich die beiden eigentlich wirklich sind. Bei Klaas ist immer eher so ein Humor auf mehreren Ebenen angesagt und Joko ist da so niedlich kindlich 😍
Klaas hat da ja eh irgendwie so eine merkwürdige schwäche für wenn Joko so ist. Wie bei dem Joko Experiment, als er dann nach dem Einspieler Tränen vom vielen Lachen in den Augen hatte und meinte Joko wäre so süß gewesen 😆❤️

“We can feel the vibration that comes from the candle flame, burning it way into our innermind, no blurry images, clear as crystal, we enter into the highest consciousness, on our journey back home, we possess the eagle’s eye, the eye that can see the invisible.”  
 ~ Michael Bassey Johnson

~ Visionary artist, Ean K Pegram “Out Of Body Experience”
~ George RedHawk motion effects ( DarkAngelOne )

“Oggi voglio ricominciare a lavorare seriamente: non vedo l’ora, perché non far niente dopo un po’ annoia, anche se mi costringo a meditare intensamente, mattina e sera, sull’arte e su altre cose. Non riesco mai a rilassarmi completamente, e invece mi farebbe bene. Così continuiamo a «lavorare» in un altro laboratorio, nella beata speranza di realizzare qualcosa: sperare è lecito, finché le tele sono ancora di un bianco abbagliante.”


G. Klimt, Dalla lettera a Marie Zimmerman, degli inizi di agosto 1903

Travelling in Spanish 🏝️

  • Viaje en tren / coche / avión. Train / Car / Plane trip
  • Viaje a caballo. Travelling on horseback
  • Viaje en el tiempo. Journey in time, time travel
  • Viaje de ida. One-way trip
  • Viaje de vuelta. Return (only) trip
  • Viaje de ida y vuelta. Round trip
  • Viaje de vacaciones. Vacation travel, travelling for the holidays
  • Viaje de trabajo. Work trip
  • Viaje de estudios. Study trip
  • Viaje de fin de curso. End-of-year trip (school)
  • Viaje astral. Out-of-body experience, astral trip
  • Viaje al pasado. Trip to the past, trip down memory lane
  • Ir de viaje / Hacer un viaje. Take a trip
  • Estar de viaje. To be travelling, away on a trip
  • ¡Que tengas buen viaje! Have a good trip!
Revolutionary Hope: A Conversation Between James Baldwin and Audre Lorde

External image

JB: One of the dangers of being a Black American is being schizophrenic, and I mean ‘schizophrenic’ in the most literal sense. To be a Black American is in some ways to be born with the desire to be white. It’s a part of the price you pay for being born here, and it affects every Black person. We can go back to Vietnam, we can go back to Korea. We can go back for that matter to the First World War. We can go back to W.E.B. Du Bois – an honorable and beautiful man – who campaigned to persuade Black people to fight in the First World War, saying that if we fight in this war to save this country, our right to citizenship can never, never again be questioned – and who can blame him? He really meant it, and if I’d been there at that moment I would have said so too perhaps. Du Bois believed in the American dream. So did Martin. So did Malcolm. So do I. So do you. That’s why we’re sitting here.

AL: I don’t, honey. I’m sorry, I just can’t let that go past. Deep, deep, deep down I know that dream was never mine. And I wept and I cried and I fought and I stormed, but I just knew it. I was Black. I was female. And I was out – out – by any construct wherever the power lay. So if I had to claw myself insane, if I lived I was going to have to do it alone. Nobody was dreaming about me. Nobody was even studying me except as something to wipe out.

JB: You are saying you do not exist in the American dream except as a nightmare.

AL: That’s right. And I knew it every time I opened Jet, too. I knew that every time I opened a Kotex box. I knew that every time I went to school. I knew that every time I opened a prayer book. I knew it, I just knew it.

JB: It is difficult to be born in a place where you are despised and also promised that with endeavor – with this, with that, you know – you can accomplish the impossible. You’re trying to deal with the man, the woman, the child – the child of whichever sex – and he or she and your man or your woman has got to deal with the 24-hour-a-day facts of life in this country. We’re not going to fly off someplace else, you know, we’d better get through whatever that day is and still have each other and still raise children – somehow manage all of that. And this is 24 hours of every day, and you’re surrounded by all of the paraphernalia of safety: If you can strike this bargain here. If you can make sure your armpits are odorless. Curl your hair. Be impeccable. Be all the things that the American public says you should do, right? And you do all those things – and nothing happens really. And what is much worse than that, nothing happens to your child either.

AL: Even worse than the nightmare is the blank. And Black women are the blank. I don’t want to break all this down, then have to stop at the wall of male/female division. When we admit and deal with difference; when we deal with the deep bitterness; when we deal with the horror of even our different nightmares; when we turn them and look at them, it’s like looking at death: hard but possible. If you look at it directly without embracing it, then there is much less that you can ever be made to fear.

JB: I agree.

AL: Well, in the same way when we look at our differences and not allow ourselves to be divided, when we own them and are not divided by them, that is when we will be able to move on. But we haven’t reached square one yet.

JB: I’m not sure of that. I think the Black sense of male and female is much more sophisticated than the western idea. I think that Black men and women are much less easily thrown by the question of gender or sexual preference – all that jazz. At least that is true of my experience.

AL: Yea, but let’s remove ourselves from merely a reactive position – i.e., Black men and women reacting to what’s out there. While we are reacting to what’s out there, we’re also dealing between ourselves – and between ourselves there are power differences that come down…

JB: Oh, yes…

AL: Truly dealing with how we live, recognizing each other’s differences, is something that hasn’t happened…

JB: Differences and samenesses.

AL: Differences and samenesses. But in a crunch, when all our asses are in the sling, it looks like it is easier to deal with the samenesses. When we deal with sameness only, we develop weapons that we use against each other when the differences become apparent. And we wipe each other out – Black men and women can wipe each other out – far more effectively than outsiders do.

JB: That’s true enough.

AL: And our blood is high, our furies are up. I mean, it’s what Black women do to each other, Black men do to each other, and Black people do to each other. We are in the business of wiping each other out in one way or the other – and essentially doing our enemy’s work.

JB: That’s quite true.

AL: We need to acknowledge those power differences between us and see where they lead us. An enormous amount of energy is being taken up with either denying the power differences between Black men and women or fighting over power differences between Black men and women or killing each other off behind them. I’m talking about Black women’s blood flowing in the streets – and how do we get a 14-year-old boy to know I am not the legitimate target of his fury? The boot is on both of our necks. Let’s talk about getting it off. My blood will not wash out your horror. That’s what I’m interested in getting across to adolescent Black boys.

There are little Black girl children having babies. But this is not an immaculate conception, so we’ve got little Black boys who are making babies, too. We have little Black children making little Black children. I want to deal with that so our kids will not have to repeat that waste of themselves.

JB: I hear you – but let me backtrack, for better or worse. You know, for whatever reason and whether it’s wrong or right, for generations men have come into the world, either instinctively knowing or believing or being taught that since they were men they in one way or another had to be responsible for the women and children, which means the universe.

AL: Mm-hm.

JB: I don’t think there’s any way around that.

AL: Any way around that now?

JB: I don’t think there’s any way around that fact.

AL: If we can put people on the moon and we can blow this whole planet up, if we can consider digging 18 inches of radioactive dirt off of the Bikini atolls and somehow finding something to do with it – if we can do that, we as Black cultural workers can somehow begin to turn that stuff around – because there’s nobody anymore buying ‘cave politics’ – ‘Kill the mammoth or else the species is extinct.’ We have moved beyond that. Those little scrubby-ass kids in the sixth grade – I want those Black kids to know that brute force is not a legitimate way of dealing across sex difference. I want to set up some different paradigms.

JB: Yea, but there’s a real difference between the way a man looks at the world…

AL: Yes, yes…

JB: And the way a woman looks at the world. A woman does know much more than a man.

AL: And why? For the same reason Black people know what white people are thinking: because we had to do it for our survival…

JB: All right, all right…

AL: We’re finished being bridges. Don’t you see? It’s not Black women who are shedding Black men’s blood on the street – yet. We’re not cleaving your head open with axes. We’re not shooting you down. We’re saying, “Listen, what’s going on between us is related to what’s going on between us and other people,” but we have to solve our own shit at the same time as we’re protecting our Black asses, because if we don’t, we are wasting energy that we need for joint survival.

JB: I’m not even disagreeing – but if you put the argument in that way, you see, a man has a certain story to tell, too, just because he is a man…

AL: Yes, yes, and it’s vital that I be alive and able to listen to it.

JB: Yes. Because we are the only hope we have. A family quarrel is one thing; a public quarrel is another. And you and I, you know – in the kitchen, with the kids, with each other or in bed – we have a lot to deal with, with each other, but we’ve got to know what we’re dealing with. And there is no way around it. There is no way around it. I’m a man. I am not a woman.

AL: That’s right, that’s right.

JB: No one will turn me into a woman. You’re a woman and you’re not a man. No one will turn you into a man. And we are indispensable for each other, and the children depend on us both.

AL: It’s vital for me to be able to listen to you, to hear what is it that defines you and for you to listen to me, to hear what is it that defines me – because so long as we are operating in that old pattern, it doesn’t serve anybody, and it certainly hasn’t served us.

JB: I know that. What I really think is that neither of us has anything to prove, at least not in the same way, if we weren’t in the North American wilderness. And the inevitable dissension between brother and sister, between man and woman – let’s face it, all those relations which are rooted in love also are involved in this quarrel. Because our real responsibility is to endlessly redefine each other. I cannot live without you, and you cannot live without me – and the children can’t live without us.

AL: But we have to define ourselves for each other. We have to redefine ourselves for each other because no matter what the underpinnings of the distortion are, the fact remains that we have absorbed it. We have all absorbed this sickness and ideas in the same way we absorbed racism. It’s vital that we deal constantly with racism, and with white racism among Black people – that we recognize this as a legitimate area of inquiry. We must also examine the ways that we have absorbed sexism and heterosexism. These are the norms in this dragon we have been born into – and we need to examine these distortions with the same kind of openness and dedication that we examine racism…

JB: You use the word ‘racism’…

AL: The hatred of Black, or color…

JB: - but beneath the word ‘racism’ sleeps the word ‘safety.’ Why is it important to be white or Black?

AL: Why is it important to be a man rather than a woman?

JB: In both cases, it is assumed that it is safer to be white than to be Black. And it’s assumed that it is safer to be a man than to be a woman. These are both masculine assumptions. But those are the assumptions that we’re trying to overcome or to confront…

AL: To confront, yeah. The vulnerability that lies behind those masculine assumptions is different for me and you, and we must begin to look at that…

JB: Yes, yes…

AL: And the fury that is engendered in the denial of that vulnerability – we have to break through it because there are children growing up believe that it is legitimate to shed female blood, right? I have to break through it because those boys really think that the sign of their masculinity is impregnating a sixth grader. I have to break through it because of that little sixth-grade girl who believes that the only thing in life she has is what lies between her legs…

JB: Yeah, but we’re not talking now about men and women. We’re talking about a particular society. We’re talking about a particular time and place. You were talking about the shedding of Black blood in the streets, but I don’t understand –

AL: Okay, the cops are killing the men and the men are killing the women. I’m talking about rape. I’m talking about murder.

JB: I’m not disagreeing with you, but I do think you’re barking up the wrong tree. I’m not trying to get the Black man off the hook – or Black women, for that matter – but I am talking about the kingdom in which we live.

AL: Yes, I absolutely agree; the kingdom in which these distortions occur has to be changed.

JB: Something happens to the man who beats up a lady. Something happens to the man who beats up his grandmother. Something happens to the junkie. I know that very well. I walked the streets of Harlem; I grew up there, right? Now you know it is not the Black cat’s fault who sees me and tries to mug me. I got to know that. It’s his responsibility but it’s not his fault. That’s a nuance. UI got to know that it’s not him who is my enemy even when he beats up his grandmother. His grandmother has got to know. I’m trying to say one’s got to see what drove both of us into those streets. We be both from the same track. Do you see what I mean? I’ve come home myself, you know, wanting to beat up anything in sight- but Audre, Audre…

AL: I’m here, I’m here…

JB: I agree with you. I see exactly what you mean and it hurts me at least as much as it hurts you. But how to maneuver oneself past this point – how not to lose him or her who may be in what is in effect occupied territory. That is really what the Black situation is in this country. For the ghetto, all that is lacking is barbed wire, and when you pen people up like animals, the intention is to debase them and you have debased them.

AL: Jimmy, we don’t have an argument

JB: I know we don’t.

AL: But what we do have is a real disagreement about your responsibility not just to me but to my son and to our boys. Your responsibility to him is to get across to him in a way that I never will be able to because he did not come out of my body and has another relationship to me. Your relationship to him as his farther is to tell him I’m not a fit target for his fury.

JB: Okay, okay…

AL: It’s so entrenched in him that it’s part of him as much as his Blackness is.

JB: All right, all right…

AL: I can’t do it. You have to.

JB: All right, I accept – the challenge is there in any case. It never occurred to me that it would be otherwise. That’s absolutely true. I simply want to locate where the danger is…

AL: Yeah, we’re at war…

JB: We are behind the gates of a kingdom which is determined to destroy us.

AL: Yes, exactly so. And I’m interested in seeing that we do not accept terms that will help us destroy each other. And I think one of the ways in which we destroy each other is by being programmed to knee-jerk on our differences. Knee-jerk on sex. Knee-jerk on sexuality…

JB: I don’t quite know what to do about it, but I agree with you. And I understand exactly what you mean. You’re quite right. We get confused with genders – you know, what the western notion of woman is, which is not necessarily what a woman is at all. It’s certainly not the African notion of what a woman is. Or even the European notion of what a woman is. And there’s certainly not standard of masculinity in this country which anybody can respect. Part of the horror of being a Black American is being trapped into being an imitation of an imitation.

AL: I can’t tell you what I wished you would be doing. I can’t redefine masculinity. I can’t redefine Black masculinity certainly. I am in the business of redefining Black womanness. You are in the business of redefining Black masculinity. And I’m saying, ‘Hey, please go on doing it,’ because I don’t know how much longer I can hold this fort, and I really feel that Black women are holding it and we’re beginning to hold it in ways that are making this dialogue less possible.

JB: Really? Why do you say that? I don’t feel that at all. It seems to me you’re blaming the Black man for the trap he’s in.

AL: I’m not blaming the Black man; I’m saying don’t shed my blood. I’m not blaming the Black man. I’m saying if my blood is being shed, at some point I’m gonna have a legitimate reason to take up a knife and cut your damn head off, and I’m not trying to do it.

JB: If you drive a man mad, you’ll turn him into a beast – it has nothing to do with his color.

AL: If you drive a woman insane, she will react like a beast too. There is a larger structure, a society with which we are in total and absolute war. We live in the mouth of a dragon, and we must be able to use each other’s forces to fight it together, because we need each other. I am saying that in our joint battle we have also developed some very real weapons, and when we turn them against each other they are even more bloody, because we know each other in a particular way. When we turn those weapons against each other, the bloodshed is terrible. Even worse, we are doing this in a structure where we are already embattled. I am not denying that. It is a family discussion I’m having now. I’m not laying blame. I do not blame Black men for what they are. I’m asking them to move beyond. I do not blame Black men; what I’m saying is, we have to take a new look at the ways in which we fight our joint oppression because if we don’t, we’re gonna be blowing each other up. We have to begin to redefine the terms of what woman is, what man is, how we relate to each other.

JB: But that demands redefining the terms of the western world…

AL: And both of us have to do it; both of us have to do it…

JB: But you don’t realize that in this republic the only real crime is to be a Black man?

AL: No, I don’t realize that. I realize the only crime is to be Black. I realize the only crime is to be Black, and that includes me too.

JB: A Black man has a prick, they hack it off. A Black man is a ****** when he tries to be a model for his children and he tries to protect his women. That is a principal crime in this republic. And every Black man knows it. And every Black woman pays for it. And every Black child. How can you be so sentimental as to blame the Black man for a situation which has nothing to do with him?

AL: You still haven’t come past blame. I’m not interested in blame, I’m interested in changing…

JB: May I tell you something? May I tell you something? I might be wrong or right.

AL: I don’t know – tell me.

JB: Do you know what happens to a man-?

AL: How can I know what happens to a man?

JB: Do you know what happens to a man when he’s ashamed of himself when he can’t find a job? When his socks stink? When he can’t protect anybody? When he can’t do anything? Do you know what happens to a man when he can’t face his children because he’s ashamed of himself? It’s not like being a woman…

AL: No, that’s right. Do you know what happens to a woman who gives birth, who puts that child out there and has to go out and hook to feed it? Do you know what happens to a woman who goes crazy and beats her kids across the room because she’s so full of frustration and anger? Do you know what that is? Do you know what happens to a lesbian who sees her woman and her child beaten on the street while six other guys are holding her? Do you know what that feels like?

JB: Mm-hm.

AL: Well then, in the same way you know how a woman feels, I know how a man feels, because it comes down to human beings being frustrated and distorted because we can’t protect the people we love. So now let’s start –

JB: All right, okay…

AL: - let’s start with that and deal.

Essence Magazine, 1984

anonymous asked:

Do you have any advice for a first time flyer? Tips for going through the process, the long flight, and exiting the airport/picking up your luggage and all specifically that would have helped you in hindsight? I have a trip coming up and I'm slightly nervous even after googling tips since I'll likely be flying alone. Thanks ^^

As someone who has flown more than a bit before, and usually by myself, I will give you The Sudden Adult’s Guide to Surviving Plane Trips ™.

Checking In:

  • For most flights, you can “check in” as early as 24 hours before your flight. This will allow you to print your boarding pass at home/library/etc. and cut some of the time you’d be wasting standing in a long-ass line waiting to print your ticket. Gotta love technology.
  • Check your flight the morning of, or a few hours, before you’re scheduled to leave for the airport. Make sure the time hasn’t changed due to weather/mechanical issues/etc. No one wants to arrive at the airport to find out their fucking flight was delayed 5 hours and they now have to wait at a crappy airport coffee shop.
  • Get dropped off at the terminal for your flight. The best way to ensure this is to have a general idea of where your terminal will be. You don’t have to be dropped off there, but it saves you from walking and dragging your luggage down to your airline’s bag check.

Luggage Tips:

  • TIP YOUR BAG PERSON. That person who you drop your luggage off with when you arrive at the airport? Tip them. I usually give $5 per bag. A nice tip and friendly attitude ensures your bag arrives at its destination (usually).
  • If you have a black/brown/gray suitcase, try making it stand out. Usually I see people tie ribbons to the handles. Personally, I have a lime green ribbon and a pink skull luggage tag that are hard to miss (but then, my regular suitcase is also metallic, so it’s a pleasant eyesore).
  • Put luggage tags on your suitcase and carry-on. Make sure your information on the tags is up-to-date. In case your shit goes missing, you want to give the airport a way of finding you.
  • Know what your airline considers a carry-on size. Sometimes airlines will change the carry-on requirements because why not do things to piss off passengers? Check by calling the airline directly or Googling “What is a carry-on bag + name of airline.” Usually you are allowed one carry-on and one personal bag (purse/backpack/laptop case).

TSA/Security Tips:

  • Know the 3-1-1 rule and follow it. Keep your tiny liquids bag in an easily-accessible front or side pocket so you can whip it out without digging through your bag. Same goes for laptops. Make it easy to pull out, because it will have to go in a bin by itself.
  • Wear shoes that easily slip on and off, because you will have to take them off to go through security. Also, wear socks, because who knows what the fuck’s on that airport floor.
  • Take any coats/hoodies off while you wait in line. TSA agents will ask you to take these off anyway, so might as well save the people behind you some time. Same goes for any jewelry, belts, or cellphones that will set off the metal detector. Put them in a pocket of your carry-on.
  • Pay attention to the line when it moves. As a (former) frequent flyer, I cannot explain how annoying it is to be stuck in a line behind someone who is not paying attention. Don’t be that person.
  • Also, if you’re not a frequent flyer, do not get in the experienced flyer line. We can smell the inexperience.
  • Keep your ID and ticket (and passport, if required) easily accessible on your person. This will make going through any additional security nice and easy for you.

Airport Tips:

  • Find out where your terminal is, then worry about getting food or drink. Nothing is more stressful than finally getting your $20 sandwich and then having to run around a large airport trying to find your terminal. Find your terminal and then embark on the search for food.
  • Do not leave your bags unattended. This should really speak for itself.
  • Pee before you fly. Like Ma always said, use the loo before you fly, boo…especially if you need to poo.
  • Good fucking luck finding a place to charge your phone/laptop/nintendo 3DS if you’re flying out during a busy time (holidays, weekends, etc.). Solve the problem by charging these things the night before you leave.

Plane Tips:

  • Put your carry-on in the overhead bin that’s near your seat. If you have anything in there that you might want during the flight (magazine, notebook, etc.), consider getting it out before you get on the plane.
  • Sit in the seat you’ve been assigned. Unless it’s a Southwest flight (which lets passengers choose their own seats upon boarding), your ticket will say where you’ll sit. Sit there. Don’t be the seat-stealing prick of the plane.
  • If you’re nervous, listen to the flight attendant at the beginning. They will explain all regular and emergency procedures. Sometimes knowing how to survive if shit hits the fan can make you feel better.
  • If you think you may  feel sick during the flight, try chewing mint-flavored gum. Gum also helps with you ears popping. If the flight serves drinks, request something soothing like ginger ale. If not, buy a $3 bottle of lemon-lime soda from a place in the airport. My personal experience is that ginger ale solves all flight sickness (or maybe that’s a placebo effect, I don’t know and don’t care, because I like ginger ale).
  • Don’t get up when the flight attendant brings out the little drink cart. There’s never a way around it, so just sit tight until it passes you if you need to get up and pee.
  • Try getting to know your seat neighbor(s), if you’re comfortable with that. Last time I flew, I had an interesting discussion with the old dude sitting next to me about the status of the US economy.

Landing & Leaving:

  • BRACE YOURSELF! Sort of kidding, but if you’re like me and planes make you nauseous, you might want to prepare yourself (I know that I personally feel most sick during turbulence and landing).
  • Don’t bother rushing to get up and stand. The damn plane’s not going to take off again while you’re still on it, so chill out and take your time. If you’re on a flight that’s part of a connecting flight, they’ll usually ask passengers who need to leave to make their next flight to get off first. Some people are jerks and will pretend just so they can leave slightly sooner than others.
  • Be careful when you open the overhead bin. They aren’t kidding when they say stuff may have shifted around. I once saw a lady get beaned on the forehead by her kid’s carry-on.
  • Make your way to the baggage claim. If you have to pee, do it now, because luggage can take a while, so you might as well empty your bladder while you can. And if you’re lost, just follow the people form your plane, or ask someone who looks like an airport employee.
  • Stand around the luggage carousel and wait for your bag. A lot of people crowd around the opening, but you can stand out and wait near the end. The bags go around in circles for fucks sake, so it’s not like you only have one chance to grab your bag. Also, double-check that it is your bag.
  • Check that your ride knows when and where to pick you up. Let them know your flight number, arrival time, and terminal so they can be on the lookout. Pick someone reliable (I’ve been left waiting before, I can tell you it sucks ass).

So…yep. That’s all the tips I can think of.

-The Sudden Adult

PS. If you’re gonna fly, don’t let your arms get tired! HA. HA. HA.

El corazon al sur
Mercedes Sosa
El corazon al sur

la geografía de mi barrio llevo en mí,
será por eso que del todo no me fui

  • Mei: Fresh lettuce is my all-time favorite food. What's your favorite food?
  • Al: Oh, I take Skittles and I put it between two Starbursts. Know what I call it?
  • Mei: Skittle Sandwich?
  • Al: ...That's pretty good. No, I call it Alphonse's Mouth Surprise. It's nice because the flavor of the Starbursts really bring out a similar flavor in the Skittles.
Assorted Tales Of Comics Masterpost

In organizing the Assorted masterpost, I realized I really like Tales games and that they’re quite good for comics. So, I decided to make this general Tales of masterpost.

If any of the Tales of series make it past 20 comics, they’ll earn their own masterpost. If that happens, it’ll be mentioned here and you’ll be able to find it on the masterposts page!

Keep reading

Modern AU where Roy is a firefighter and, one day, he and his team get called to house fire with two kids still caught inside.

So they go in and everything is already pretty much engulfed by flames, but they make their way through, calling out and hoping for an answer. Eventually, they find the boys, half-buried underneath a fallen beam, one brother shielding the other who is unconscious.

So the team lift the beams and pull the kids out, Roy making a grab for the smaller one who is heavily injured but just starts thrashing, delirious, pleading for them to save his little brother first, because it was his fault, he was experimenting with chemicals, Al needs to be alright, Al is the the only one important-

But Havoc’s already got a hold of the boy named Al, and so they get the hell out of there, because the timber might just come crashing down at any moment.

They hand the kids over to the paramedics, extinguish the fire, secure the premises, and then their work for the day is done.

Roy goes home to wash off the smoke and the soot and the blood of a little blonde boy.

The next day, the newspaper reads that the younger brother is in a coma while the other has lost two limbs, and Roy bites the inside of his cheek and wonders whether he even really made a difference.


Years later, when he has barely ever thought about the boys again, when he is older and scarred with flames, when he has just lost his eyesight on a fire run and does not yet know whether it will be temporary, when he is twisting his fingers and waiting at the hospital for the doctor to examine him-

He overhears a conversation, two young men talking, bantering, one fondly exasperated, the other griping that ‘C'mon, Al, I can skip the appointment just this once, you can just check the prostheses at home, right?’

But Al just waves him off,  'I have a patient now, brother, so would you please -’ and 'Good morning, Mister Mustang. I am Doctor Alphonse Elric and I’ll do you’re check-up for today’, and then it just clicks in Roy’s brain.

And he stumbles over himself a little, feeling stupid to introduce himself like this, like he has some sort of savior complex, but this means so much to him, these two boys who managed to make it despite the odds, and Alphonse is an intern now and he’s dedicated his life to saving people, much like Roy has. And the older brother reluctantly introduces himself as Edward and doesn’t shake his hand because 'mine’s fake anyway’, doesn’t thank Roy for saving his life, doesn’t want to talk about the fire because there is still that sharp edge of guilt in his voice.

But Alphonse insists that the least they could do is treat Roy to lunch, and from there everything just snowballs. Roy’s regular doctor appointments lead to him finding out that Edward hasn’t been slacking off either, that he’s revolutionizing the world of physics.

But Roy is still struggling with his blindness, does not want to accept it, can literally see nothing but bleak darkness stretching out in front of him for the rest of his life. And Alphonse confesses that back after the surgeries, Ed had been in a similar slump, that he’d thought of himself as crippled and useless, but that he’d managed to find his path after all; and Al gently suggests that maybe Ed would be willing to sit down with Roy and share experiences.

Roy doesn’t know how Al blackmailed his brother, but soon he finds himself attending regular coffee dates with Edward, talking things out, both of them reluctant at first, skirting around the issues, but eventually opening up to one another, confessing some of their darker thoughts, their darker moments, and everything beyond and between that.

Finally, however, it turns out that Roy’s sight is not irreparably damaged. Finally, Al asks him so please open his eyes so he can check.

'Not yet,’ Roy says breathlessly because he wants the first thing he sees again to be Edward, yet Al just laughs and admits 'I expected something like that’, and Ed is already there any waiting.

After weeks and weeks of darkness, Roy’s vision is filled with gold.


Bonus: Black Hayate as a search dog.

youtube

AL BIELEK – THE ALTERNATIVE FUTURE TIME LINES & TIME TRAVEL

This is a special additional archive footage to “AL BIELEK – THE COMPLETE VIDEO AUTOBIOGRAPHY” never before seen. Recorded in Denver, CO, 20th April, 2000 A.D.

Al Bielek was part of the Philadelphia Experiment that sent him into the future to two different time periods. In this video he speaks about the changes in the world that he noticed while in the future. Bielek had learned of many catastrophes, including the NWO takeover, major geological changes that altered each continent’s coast line, and World War Three breaking out between US/Europe and Russia/China. He mentioned these events long ago, and we are now starting to see them take place. Did Al Bielek really visit the future? Did the Philadelphia Experiment really take place? That’s for you to decide. Nevertheless, it sure makes for one hell of a story.

theguardian.com
Half a century after his big brother arrived in London to begin his short career, Leon Hendrix reflects on Jimi’s life and music
By Ed Vulliamy

Leon is slender, intense, and enjoys the inevitable conversation about his brother rather than himself, in the room which Jimi called “the first real home of my own”.

Everyone knows the Hendrix childhood was hardly that of a model family – a mother who left, and a father who drank more than he cared. “But Jimi looked after me,” recalls Leon. “For some reason, I never missed a meal. He looked out for me like an elder-brother-father; he made me what you English call ‘tea’ and made sure I was OK. And sometimes, we used to sneak off to Mom’s for dinner.”

But where did the music come from? “It’s called inspiration,” says Leon, almost scolding. “As in ‘spirit’, as in ‘in-spirit-ation’. It’s in the wind. I was there when Jimi was a boy, and he’d play with a broom, his first guitar. And Pa would come home and see the straw and shit from the broom on the floor, because Jimi’d been doing acrobatics with his his broom-guitar, and Jimi’d get a whuppin’.”

According to Leon’s book, Jimi Hendrix: A Brother’s Story, Jimi’s first real instrument was a ukulele the boys found while cleaning out a neighbour’s garage. When he finally got a guitar, Jimi, says Leon, “used to take gold tassels from his Pa’s empty Seagrams 7 bottles and tie them to it.

“But the music came from nowhere,” he says. “Music has no body, and I remember when Jimi was playing, he’d try to conjure up the sound with his fingers – where is it?” Once, “when we were little, Jimi took a radio apart, trying to find the music inside it. We lost the screwdriver behind the sofa and couldn’t put it back together, and that was another whuppin’.”

Leon says, poignantly, of Hendrix’s soft vocal timbre: “It came from always being told to shut up as a kid. Jimi went inside with his music, and when he got on stage, that was his time”.

There is genetic lineage, it turns out, as Leon imparts some new information “My mother’s grandfather was a musician. He was black, but looked so white he was allowed to play, down in Louisiana. He played orchestral music in the 1800s.” However, “my own children want nothing to do with music, they’ve seen what it did to us. My daughter’s in Mexico and my son wants to be a scientist, or a doctor. But I’ve got these grandchildren – and they’re mighty interested. ‘Hey, grandpa, play us that music by uncle Jimi!’ [Read More]