experiences,

anonymous asked:

I once found a bat in my kitchen. Like, not flying around or hanging upside down just chilling on the countertop. Had no fuckin idea what to do, so I opened some windows and went for a walk. When I came back, instead of a bat, $20 was on the counter.

i dont even know how to respond to this besides that this is one of the best paranormal experiences ive ever heard

#GrowingUpWithStrictParents

- All jokes turn into a lecture, and get mad when you don’t joke around with them.

- I literally can’t change in my own room cause I’m too scared one of my parents are going to barge in my room without knocking

- Having to use headphones every time you’re on the internet to avoid parents coming in and making you turn the computer off.

- Dealing with their hypocrisy. Like no joke, my mom told me all I have to do is eat, sleep, and study for the rest of my life, so I wouldn’t waste my life.

- When one thing goes awry in the house, all hell breaks loose.

- Saying no to all your friends’ invites because your parents won’t let you.

- Learning to lie automatically because there was no privacy in your life.

- Literally rules about rules

-  "I always love you, but I expect you to behave in this way,“ or, "I know you can do better.’”

- Yelling about how stupid you are, but then expect you to be happy two seconds after.

- Complain that you don’t study enough, even if your grades are perfect

- Complain you don’t eat enough, but call you fat.

- Scarce communication.

- Nagging. Dear lord, the NAGGING

- Not allowed to do the things you want, just what they want.

- When you do get to hang out with your friends, you need to collect all their parents’ phone numbers.

- Getting really confused when you see your friends get to go wherever they want.

- Doing all of your work just so you won’t need to experience the horror of your parents yelling at you.

- All your decisions were made for you

- Making you study certain subjects so you’ll be what they want you to be when you grow up. 

*All these points are from personal experiences* 

I’ve come to think that flourishing consists of putting yourself in situations in which you lose self-consciousness and become fused with other people, experiences, or tasks. It happens sometimes when you are lost in a hard challenge, or when an artist or a craftsman becomes one with the brush or the tool. It happens sometimes while you’re playing sports, or listening to music or lost in a story, or to some people when they feel enveloped by God’s love. And it happens most when we connect with other people. I’ve come to think that happiness isn’t really produced by conscious accomplishments. Happiness is a measure of how thickly the unconscious parts of our minds are intertwined with other people and with activities. Happiness is determined by how much information and affection flows through us covertly every day and year.
—  David Brooks
youtube

Rainbow in a Brown World by Rhea Dease

“Rainbow In A Brown World” is an entertaining, an educative and an animated film that depicts a day-in-the-life of a queer Indian woman as she goes about her daily routine and encounters various people who question her regarding her sexuality. The protagonist ‘Aarti’ is a young, queer woman who finds herself at the receiving end of an absurd, often hilarious albeit well intentioned questions about being LGBT. However, she answers these wittily and is often amused by them.

An ancient philosopher once said that the bee extracts honey from the pollen of the flower, while from the same source the spider extracts poison. The problem which then confronts us is: are we bees or spiders? Do we transform the experiences of life into honey, or do we change them into poison? Do they lift us, or do we eternally rebel against the pricks? Many people become soured by experience, but the wise one takes the honey and builds it into the beehive of his own spiritual nature.
—  Manly P. Hall - Excerpted from “The Occult Anatomy of Man”
While investing deeply in one person, one place, one job, one activity might deny us the breadth of experience we’d like, pursuing a breadth of experience denies us the opportunity to experience the rewards of depth of experience.  There are some experiences that you can have only when you’ve lived in the same place for five years, when you’ve been with the same person for over a decade, when you’ve been working on the same skill or craft for half your lifetime.  Now that I’m in my thirties, I can finally recognize that commitment, in its own way, offers a wealth of opportunity and experiences that would otherwise never be available to me, no matter where I went or what I did.
psa

people who say Split is a great movie and doesn’t harm anyone (and also don’t listen to people who try to educate them), or those who think those with DID are faking and that they aren’t real, religious nuts who think alters are demons,

are the exact reason why us and people like us sometimes literally do not want to exist.

We didn’t think of ourselves as freaks, outcasts, literal demons, get stuck in denial cycles that are as deep as ours are, before we met people who said:

“you are not real”

“you are faking”

– “you are demons”

– “DID is made-up for attention”

– “you are making this up for attention”

“you haven’t been through trauma”

Those who are multiple internalizing beliefs like that because everyone or almost everyone on real life says those things to them can be very harmful to ones mental health.

Just please consider what you say before you say it, just a bit, please.