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Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty, which closed at 23.00 on 2 August, became the V&A’s most visited exhibition with 493,043 people seeing it in total during its 21-week run. For the final two weekends, the V&A opened the exhibition throughout the night for the first time in its history to accommodate unprecedented demand.

Savage Beauty in Numbers, 2015. // Victoria and Albert Museum

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Have you been in to check out “Y.C. Hong: Advocate for Chinese-American Inclusion” yet? This exhibition looks examines the role You Chung (“Y.C.”) Hong played as an immigration lawyer, civic leader, and active proponent for equal rights in early 20th–century Los Angeles. The show runs through Mar. 22 in the West Hall of the Library.

Included in the show is the object pictured above: an Improved Shu Zhendong-style Chinese typewriter 改良舒式華文打字機, ca. 1935.

From the exhibition’s curator, Li Wei Yang:
This rare Chinese typewriter, purchased by Y.C. Hong in the late 1930s, features more than twenty-five hundred characters etched on movable metal slugs in its tray bed. A typist would operate it by using his or her right hand to maneuver the character selection lever across the character chart. When the desired character was selected, the typist pressed down on the type bar, which picked up the metal slug, inked it, and made an impression on paper.

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These kids lived in a golden age of sorts, when electric toy trains were growing in popularity and improving in quality. But don’t get too wistful, because you, too, can share some of their fascination by visiting the exhibition Holiday Express: Toys and Trains from the Jerni Collection, on view through February 28. 


William D. Hassler. Two unidentified small children peering at toy trains in a shop window, New York City, undated (ca. November 1915). N-YHS.

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I am excited to share the work of an artist friend, printmaker, teacher and maker of extraordinarily complex and beautiful images, Orit Hofshi.  Born in Kibbutz Matzuva, Israel, in 1959, Orit practice has for many years focused on printmaking, works on paper, installations and woodcutting as her primary mediator.  Concerned with the past/present political realities, Orit imagery projects the perception of oneself in relation to natural and manmade topographies and investigates broader personal and social narratives. Educated in Israel, the United Kingdom and the United States, Orit has exhibited widely in Israel, Europe and throughout the United States. She lives and works in Herzliya, Israel.  
-Endi

“Dazzling the eyes and intriguing the mind”

Read why The New York Times called Audubon to Warhol “an enthralling show.” Click here for the full article.

“Fishbowl Fantasy,” 1867, by Edward A. Goodes (Private Collection)

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Have you been by to check out “Y.C. Hong: Advocate for Chinese-American Inclusion” yet? This exhibition looks at the role You Chung (“Y.C.”) Hong played as an immigration lawyer, civic leader, and active proponent for equal rights in early 20th–century Los Angeles. The show runs through Mar. 22 in the West Hall of the Library.

Top image:
Y.C. Hong’s business card/business flyer, ca. 1928. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

Translation: These blessings I wish for my compatriots:/ Businesses that flourish,/ Fortunes smoothly sought,/ And once that is done, safe and speedy passage home.

Bottom image:
Photographer unknown, Y.C. Hong in New Chinatown, photograph, 1950s. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

Y.C. Hong’s life story as a Chinese American in California is one of many in the state’s 165-year history, but his influence changed the lives of Chinese in this country and all over the world. After Y.C. relocated his office to New Chinatown, the Hong Buildings became symbols of Chinese American social, economic, and political inclusion. Visitors to Chinatown today might note the colorful buildings’ historic and beautiful architecture, but to Chinese Americans who lived through the exclusion era the Hong Buildings are reminders of Y.C.’s career-long advocacy for Chinese American rights.

In a series seen in “Picture This: Contemporary Photography and India,” Gauri Gill uses photography to empower a community of young women.

“Madhu and Rampyari,” 2003, by Gauri Gill (Courtesy of the artist and Thomas Erben Gallery, New York) © Gauri Gill

The creators of the drawings in “Drawn from Courtly India” had an inventive way to correct mistakes. They often made adjustments and additions by using white opaque watercolor, similar to the way we use white-out to mask typos.

A Nobleman and His Family in a Pavilion,“ c. 1790, India

theguardian.com
Snap! Classic paparazzi moments – in pictures
Clément Chéroux, curator of a French exhibition focusing on paparazzi photography, talks to Elizabeth Day about his favourite shots
By Elizabeth Day

The Guardian article includes this classic 1975 photo of Marlene Dietrich striking a paparazzo in Orly in 1975. Ironically, the moment was captured by another paparazzo.

The article also features this shot, which is not a real event but a still from Federico Fellini’s classic, La Dolce Vita.

Sadly, whoever put together the Guardian post overlooked that the term “paparazzi” is based on a celebrity photographer character in Federico Fellini’s classic, La Dolce Vita. The photographer character’s name is Paparazzo. (I am almost certain in the photo above he is the man behind and to the right of the photographer at the very base of the stairs, the one with the sunglasses.) You can read about Paparazzo’s cinematic origin here.

The video clip below shows La Dolce Vita stills that feature Paparazzo.