exhibited works

5

#Blackout Featured Artist: Sloane Siobhan

The Artist Behind “Lollipop Girl” featured on the #Blackout’s Shorty Awards Page.

Sloane Siobhan is a visual artist specializing in oil painting. Nurturing her talents at the age of 4, she enrolled in MonArt and was trained by Jillian Goldberg and later attended high school at NorthWest School of the Arts to concentrate in visual arts. She graduated from Appalachian State University in December 2016 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts, and painting concentration.

Sloane has worked on various projects including but not limited to client commissions, t-shirt designs & banners for the student run club Black Student Association, and silent auctions for the Heart Association. She was published in the Charlotte Observer in an article showcasing her talents to help spread awareness about the plight of women in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The article highlighted her successful solo exhibition at Providence Gallery in Charlotte, NC in 2010 in which all proceeds from the exhibit went to the foundation, Women for Women.

She was accepted into a year-long group exhibition at Appalachian State’s Chancellor’s House and exhibited her work in the 2016 group summer show, Visual Jungle in Charlotte, NC. She was commissioned by Appalachian State’s chancellor to create a piece for the university, that was also featured in the Bachelor of Fine Arts group exhibition, Calico, in December of 2016.

Sloane currently resides in Charlotte, NC and travels to do shows along the East coast.

Artwork and Bio reposted with permission. Do not remove credits.

10

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive

June 12–October 1, 2017 The Museum of Modern Art

Frank Lloyd Wright was one of the most prolific and renowned architects of the 20th century, a radical designer and intellectual who embraced new technologies and materials, pioneered do-it-yourself construction systems as well as avant-garde experimentation, and advanced original theories with regards to nature, urban planning, and social politics. Marking the 150th anniversary of the American architect’s birth on June 8, 1867, MoMA presents Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive, a major exhibition that critically engages his multifaceted practice. 

The exhibition comprises approximately 450 works made from the 1890s through the 1950s, including architectural drawings, models, building fragments, films, television broadcasts, print media, furniture, tableware, textiles, paintings, photographs, and scrapbooks, along with a number of works that have rarely or never been publicly exhibited. Structured as an anthology rather than a comprehensive, monographic presentation of Wright’s work, the exhibition is divided into 12 sections, each of which investigates a key object or cluster of objects from the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives, interpreting and contextualizing it, and juxtaposing it with other works from the Archives, from MoMA, or from outside collections. The exhibition seeks to open up Wright’s work to critical inquiry and debate, and to introduce experts and general audiences alike to new angles and interpretations of this extraordinary architect.

Happy 150th Birthday FLW!

10

FACADES, an exhibition of photographic works by German artist ©Markus Brunetti.

  • Orvieto, Duomo di Santa Maria Assunta
  • Dresden, Frauenkirche
  • Piazzola sul Brenta Cathedral
  • Angoulême, Cathédrale Saint-Pierre
  • Amiens, Cathédrale Notre-Dame
  • The Church of Santa Marinha
  • Jerez de la Frontera - Cartuja de Santa María de la Defensión
  • Valera Igreja Paroquial
  • Ottobeuren St. Alexander und Theodor
  • Leon Cathedral, in the Picardy region of France

How about Enjolras who stress cleans?

Combeferre and Courfeyrac both know from living with Enjolras that the state of the house is a clear indication of how stressed Enjolras is.

  • A clean kitchen means that Enjolras is stuck on a part of his essay or speech and needs half an hour to come up with just the right phrase.
  • Their bedrooms all tidied up means that he’s finished off a major piece of work and isn’t happy with the result but just can’t get it to work.
  • Enjolras following you around with a broom and dustpan and yelling at you for dropping crumbs on the floor means he’s just had a particularly awful argument conversation or read something that really made him angry and it’s best to stay out of his way.
  • Coming home to a house smelling like hospital grade cleaning products means Enjolras is worried about someone and doesn’t know how to express his concern

Combeferre and Courfeyrac have learnt to just let Enjolras be when he gets like this, knowing he’ll come out of it in his own time.

But Grantaire hasn’t lived with Enjolras before, so when they start dating, he doesn’t know that avoiding the stressed blonde is perfectly acceptable. So instead, he comes up with his own way of helping Enjolras deal.

  • Grantaire who introduces Enjolras to stress baking so that they can at least enjoy the fruits of all that energy spent.
  • Grantaire who takes Enjolras to his studio so that their fearless leader can take his aggression out on paints and then pass it off as Enjolras creating art (”people get paid obscene amounts to do this you know, and you’re a natural - I think you could get rich from this!”)
  • Grantaire who sits down with Enjolras one day and researches on environmentally friendly cleaning products and alternatives to store bought products (”all the blogs say baking soda and vinegar, E - we’ll need to go shopping”) because he doesn’t like how dry and calloused Enjolras’s hands are because the dope doesn’t bother with gloves when he cleans.

Enjolras learns to make the most delicious puff pastries and home-made macarons (and Grantaire starts complaining he’s putting on weight).

Grantaire sneaks in one of E’s artwork in his exhibition as a guest work and calls it “Fury” - it sells for obscene amounts of money (much to Enjolras’s dismay and Grantaire’s delight)

the hardest thing i have ever had to roleplay in dnd was when we went into a volcano and a party member said we should just drop some rocks on it to stop it from erupting and my elf from a village in the middle of a flat swampy woodland with no techtonics would not know how volcanoes work but i as a geologist had to fight the urge to go on a 10 minute rant about how volcanoes errupt and how that would not help

Crossing Borders: Immigration and American Culture

As part of our Citizens and Borders initiative, we have launched a digital exhibition of works from MoMA’s collection by artists who immigrated to the U.S., often as refugees in search of safe haven. The works were chosen by staff across the Museum, and represent a range of mediums—painting, sculpture, drawing, photography, performance, film, design, and architecture—and a span of nearly 100 years.

We’ll be posting a selection of those works here over the next week, but you can explore all the works at mo.ma/crossingborders.

[Arshile Gorky. Garden in Sochi. c. 1943. Oil on canvas. Acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest. © 2017 Estate of Arshile Gorky/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]