exchange student

This is my #1 language learning tip!  I’ve been asked to explain this many times so here we go

This map is from an app called periscope. It is a live streaming app much like Facebook or Instagram live, and it’s super easy to watch live streams from all over the world! 

“Why is this so great?” You might ask. Well… 

1. You can get great listening practice with native speakers talking about real life things (how their days was, a funny story, listening to and talking about music) 

2. You can hold a convo through their commenting system to practice reading/writing 

3. It’s easy to make friends! Finding people to follow is as easy as picking a country and browsing who is broadcasting at the moment 

ALSO red broadcasts are happening right now and blue are old ones. If you feel intimidated, watch some blue ones with no pressure of them knowing you’re there. I hope this app helps some of you with your language studies!

Quirks About Germans Americans Still Can’t Get Over

If you live in a country long enough, which many American exchange students do, you start to become desensitized to what once struck you as odd. You no longer stand in awe of the number of toilet buttons or scoff at people waiting for walking signals when no cars are coming. Some things, however, just never become familiar. We asked former American exchange students to Germany what cultural quirks still give them pause.

Wearing clothes more than once

Originally posted by funky-blue

Generally speaking, Americans grow up somewhat fussy about germs and dirt. We carry around hand sanitizer. We carefully wash all of produce. We also throw into the laundry clothes we’ve worn for only one day. In Germany, unless you worked out in them or spilled something on them, there is no shame or stigma attached to wearing clothes again–even multiple days in a row.

Greeting people with “Mahlzeit!”

Originally posted by justalittletumblweed

Can you imagine walking past someone at work in America and greeting them with, “Lunch!” But in Germany, this is a common way to greet coworkers during the mid-day hours.

How they count on their fingers

If you’ve seen the movie Inglorious Bastards, you are already on the up-and-up on German counting behaviors. Americans show numbers with their palm faced away from them and start with their pointer finger. Germans count with their palm faced towards them and start with their thumb.

Tugging of the eye

Originally posted by neondragonfly

In America, sarcasm is best served subtly. Since sarcasm is a bit of a national pastime and is brought to artistic levels in some circles, it can make it tricky to know when an American is joking. In Germany, sarcasm is presented visually, by pulling at the bottom of an eyelid to indicate that everything you say after that is meant in jest.

Fake names on social media

Originally posted by giantmonster

Met a cool German and want to connect with them on social media? Well, GOOD LUCK. Germans tend to be more concerned about their privacy and often change their names on social media to something completely unrelated to their actual name.

Buying your own birthday cake

Originally posted by floresdeceniza

Nothing knocks the wind out of an American’s sails like being expected to bring their own cake to their birthday party.

English is “german-o-fied”

When Americans travel to Germany, they often expect to be fully immersed in the German language. This is not exactly the case. The German language is speckled with English words like googeln and tweeten and American music is played on the radio or at events. Dipping in and out of one’s mother tongue can make it difficult to learn a new language.

Enthusiasm for carbonated beverages

Originally posted by disneymoviesanywhere

Bubbles! Bubbles everywhere and in everything! Oh, it doesn’t have bubbles? Well let’s mix that juice with some carbonated water.

Shoes just for the house

House shoes, or slippers, are like normal shoes but softer and comfier. They’re like something in between socks and shoes.

Frische Luft

Originally posted by benmullins

You finally escaped the whipping wind and cold outside. It’s snowing and you look out the window and express your gratitude that you aren’t out there anymore. Then, across the room, someone complains about stale air and requests some frische Luft and OPENS THE WINDOW IN WINTER. Now the air is “fresh” but you are freezing. Who is winning here?

What is going on with your beds?

Arguably the most efficient set-up for bed-making: The pillow takes up like half of the bed and there is just one thick sheet that has it’s own case.

just international student things:

  • teaching each other swear words in your languages
  • trying to learn the unwritten social rules what do you mean you have to take your shoes off inside
  • knowing more people from other countries than the country you’re in
  • “I should come visit you” 
  • how do people not have [food item] in the supermarket??????
  • struggling with the international student office 
  • “lmao why would you come here to study this country sucks” 
  • getting strangely patriotic even though you weren’t before
  • but seriously it’s weird I kinda love my own country more now?
  • having someone come up to you and say “hey I know something in your language!” and it’s a swear word
youtube

HI GUYS. I just uploaded a day in my life. It would mean a lot to me if you could like and comment <3 I hope you guys enjoyed it and I had a lot of fun making this 

That’s good [being an exchange student]. That’s scary. That’s exciting. That’s brave. You know what they say: travel is the antithesis to bigotry. If you really go out there, and you really see the world and you meet different people and you experience the reality of people that have different languages and religions and different ways of life then, you know, it makes you a happier, more accepting person. So you go and be an exchange student. That’s rad. Go, you.
— 

@danielhowell​ during his live show on the 4th of July 2017

Quotes from Dan (64/?)

As someone who went on exchange myself and have traveled a lot with my family, if you get the opportunity to experience other cultures please take it. You won’t even believe all the things you’ll learn. 

Dear baby exchange students,

Yeah you, the ones who are so excited to fly away in just a few months or weeks. Take a deep breath, this is really exciting - I know! Here’s a few tips from a girl who is not ready to leave her host country, hopefully they are a bit different from the “don’t hide in your room” tips you always hear:

1. Take photos. Of everything. A good meal, your friends, a dog you see on the street. Do not be embarrassed to take selfies in front of random things. The locals won’t get it, but they don’t have to.

2. Eat the scary thing. It might be nasty, it might be amazing - either way you have a story.

3. Don’t take a single moment de granted. Because one day you won’t see that view of the town on your long, rainy walk home. You will miss it.

4. Exchange weight is whatever. Eat all the things. Eat Japanese sweets and Italian pasta with your friends until your stomach hurts from good food and laughing.

5. A good way to make friends is just tagging along. My best friends here, I made by pretty much following them around for weeks until I became a part of the friend-clique. It works!

6. Take a deep breath. Some days, everything will suck. Remember how lucky you are to explore the world.

7. Go to school. But also skip class. Be lagom, as the Swedes say. It doesn’t translate to English properly, but it means not too much, not too little - just right.

8. Remember that you go through 5 years worth of growth in exchange. That comes with five years of emotions in one year. Feel these intense feelings, and roll with them. Let them come. It will make you better.

Good luck, my little exchangers! You’ve got the world ahead of you - go take it all in!

I’ve been nearly 3 weeks in Korea and I’ve been doing little stationery shopping since university starts soon! I’ve only visited Muji and Artbox so far but can’t wait to see other places too, everything is so pretty and cute here when it comes to stationery!

50 Things I missed out on while on exchange

1. journaling

2. taking pictures of some random things

3. trying some weird food

4. buying a book in my host countries language

5. going to a disco

6. traveling with my organisation

7. a lot of small souvenirs

8. trying a bit harder to learn the language

9. making more friends in my host country

10. celebrating the shit out off holidays

11. having fun on my birthday

12. buying a flag of my host country

13. going to a sports event in my host country

14. doing something fun with my host family

15. take a trip with a friend

16. trying a new sports

17. eating as if I were going to die tomorrow

18. taking videos

19. seriously trying to ace a test

20. trying to regularly watch a TV series that’s an original in my host country

21. do something I’m scared of

22. Look at every single church

23. take a picture of all the food

24. random selfies

25. sending my friends/family at home pictures

26. sending my friends a long message in my host countries language just to brag

27. spend way too much money

28. try somthing that’s totally not from your host country but you don’t have in your country

29. take pictures of the airport

30. take pictures when I arrived

31. take pictures when I left

32. told that boy that I like him

33. dressed a little slutty

34. trying weird products

35. buying presents for my friends back home

36. writing on my tumblr

37. getting excited about little things

38. take pretty pictures of myself

39. take pretty pictures of landscapes

40. trying not to talk to my friends at home at all for at least a month

41. writing a letter to myself before going on exchange

42. spending more time outside

43. not worrying about school

44. crushing on boys but not caring too much

45. hanging out with people I normally wouldn’t hang out with

46. becoming a fan of a regional sports club

47. going to every into meeting

48. trying to teach someone my language

49. cry less

50. laugh more

Best description of an exchange year?

Exchange is change. Rapid, brutal, beautiful, hurtful, colourful, amazing, unexpected, overwhelming and most of all constant change. Change in lifestyle, country, language, friends, parents, houses, school, simply everything.
Exchange is realizing that everything they told you beforehand is wrong, but also right in a way.
Exchange is going from thinking you know who you are, to having no idea who you are anymore to being someone new. But not entirely new. You are still the person you were before but you jumped into that ice cold lake. You know how it feels like to be on your own. Away from home, with no one you really know. And you find out that you can actually do it.
Exchange is thinking. All the time. About everything. Thinking about those strange costumes, the strange food, the strange language. About why you’re here and not back home. About how it’s going to be like once you come back home. How that girl is going to react when you see her again. About who’s hanging out where this weekend. At first who’s inviting you at all. And in the end where you’re supposed to go, when you’re invited to ten different things. About how everybody at home is doing. About how stupid this whole time-zone thing is. Not only because of home, but also because the tv ads for shows keep confusing you.
Thinking about what’s right and what’s wrong. About how stupid or rude you just were to someone without meaning to be. About the point of all this. About the sense of life. About who you want to be, what you want to do. And about when that English essay is due, even though you’re marks don’t count. About whether you should go home after school, or hang out at someone’s place until midnight. Someone you didn’t even know a few months ago. And about what the hell that guy just said.
Exchange is people. Those incredibly strange people, who look at you like you’re an alien. Those people who are too afraid to talk to you. And those people who actually talk to you. Those people who know your name, even though you have never met them. Those people, who tell you who to stay away from. Those people who talk about you behind your back, those people who make fun of your country. All those people, who aren’t worth your giving a damn. Those people you ignore.
And those people who invite you to their homes. Who keep you sane. Who become your friends.
Exchange is music. New music, weird music, cool music, music you will remember all your life as the soundtrack of your exchange. Music that will make you cry because all those lyrics express exactly how you feel, so far away. Music that will make you feel like you could take on the whole world. And it is music you make. With the most amazing musicians you’ve ever met. And it is site reading a thousand pages just to be part of the school band.
Exchange is uncomfortable. It’s feeling out of place, like a fifth wheel. It’s talking to people you don’t like. It’s trying to be nice all the time. It’s bugs.. and bears. It’s cold, freezing cold. It’s homesickness, it’s awkward silence and its feeling guilty because you didn’t talk to someone at home. Or feeling guilty because you missed something because you were talking on Skype.
Exchange is great. It’s feeling the connection between you and your host parents grow. It’s knowing in which cupboard the peanut butter is. It’s meeting people from all over the world. It’s having a place to stay in almost every country of the world.
It’s cooking food from your home country and not messing up. It’s seeing beautiful landscapes that you never knew existed.
Exchange is exchange students. The most amazing people in the whole wide world. Those people from everywhere who know exactly how you feel and those people who become your absolute best friends even though you only see most of them 3 or 4 times during your year. The people, who take almost an hour to say their final goodbyes to each other. Those people with the jackets full of pins. All over the world.
Exchange is falling in love with this amazing, wild, beautiful country. And with your home country.
Exchange is frustrating. Things you can’t do, things you don’t understand. Things you say, that mean the exact opposite of what you meant to say. Or even worse…
Exchange is understanding.
Exchange is unbelievable.
Exchange is not a year in your life. It’s a life in one year.
Exchange is nothing like you expected it to be, and everything you wanted it to be.
Exchange is the best year of your life so far. Without a doubt. And it’s also the worst. Without a doubt.
Exchange is something you will never forget, something that will always be a part of you. It is something no one back at home will ever truly understand.
Exchange is growing up, realizing that everybody is the same, no matter where they’re from. That there is great people and douche bags everywhere. And that it only depends on you how good or bad your day is going to be. Or the whole year.
And it is realizing that you can be on your own, that you are an independent person. Finally. And it’s trying to explain that to your parents.
Exchange is dancing in the rain for no reason, crying without a reason, laughing at the same time. It’s a turmoil of every emotion possible.
Exchange is everything. And exchange is something you can’t understand unless you’ve been through it !

- exchange students in USA 2014/2015