SALAZZLE HELP GUIDE

OKAY LISTEN UP PEEPS

Are you looking for a female Salandit so you can get your lovely Salazzle for your Pokemon Sun and Moon team? Tired of dealing with that awful 87.5% male to 12.5% female ratio? Then look no further than this pretty mofo right here:

THAT’S RIGHT, YA BOY SYLVEON. But why this magnificent little ribbon twirler? Because of this:

When your Eevee evolves into Sylveon with 5 hearts in Pokemon Refresh, it will automatically get the ability Cute Charm. This is where the kicker comes in!

THE CHANCE OF ENCOUNTERING A POKEMON OF THE OPPOSITE GENDER IS 66.7%, REGARDLESS OF GENDER RATIOS!

So go grab yourself a male Eevee off of route 4, love the shit out of the little man in Refresh, and go catch yourself some female Salandits to get that Salazzle! Happy Hunting!

Fake Mimikyu evolution(s)!

The other one is based on @rarefaction​ ‘s awesome idea (so credit to them!) that Mimikyu’s second evolution would just be Mimikyu without the Pikachu disguise! The trainer makes Mimikyu appreciate itself for what it is!

And the other one is my idea - Mimikyu doesn’t learn to love itself and the grudge and sadness is just too much. It turns into an angry and bitter monster, who’s powerful but very alone. :[

In 2015, Lida Xing was visiting a market in northern Myanmar when a salesman brought out a piece of amber about the size of a pink rubber eraser. Inside, he could see a couple of ancient ants and a fuzzy brown tuft that the salesman said was a plant.

As soon as Xing saw it, he knew it wasn’t a plant. It was the delicate, feathered tail of a tiny dinosaur.

“I have studied paleontology for more than 10 years and have been interested in dinosaurs for more than 30 years. But I never expected we could find a dinosaur in amber. This may be the coolest find in my life,” says Xing, a paleontologist at China University of Geosciences in Beijing. “The feathers on the tail are so dense and regular, this is really wonderful.”

He persuaded the Dexu Institute of Palaeontology to buy the artifact.

After analyzing the delicate tail, Xing and his colleagues in China, the U.K. and Canada now have an idea of what type of dinosaur it is, and of the evolutionary clues it holds. Their research was published Thursday in the journal Current Biology.

They say that 99 million years ago, a baby dinosaur about the size of a sparrow got stuck in tree sap and never made it out. Had the young dinosaur had a more auspicious day, it would have grown up to be a little smaller than an ostrich.

Baby Dinosaur’s 99-Million-Year-Old Tail, Encased In Amber, Surfaces In Myanmar

Photo: Ryan McKellar/Royal Saskatchewan Museum
Caption: A baby dinosaur’s tail is encased in amber along with ants, a beetle and plant fragments.

anonymous asked:

Why are there no flightless bats?

I discussed this in a lot more detail in my article on the pekapeka (a bat from New Zealand that spends about half its time on the ground), but in general, here are the reasons:

1. Compared to other flighted animal groups like birds and insects, bats are relatively new on the scene evolutionarily. They evolved flight about 52 million years ago. Compare that to birds, which have had about 150 million years to get comfortable with flying- only a few have ever lost it in that time.

2. Flying is a powerful antipredator defense and allows bats to get at resources they wouldn’t normally get, like flying insects and high-hanging flowers and fruit. This means there is currently strong evolutionary pressure for bats to retain flight in most parts of the world. One example where there was not was New Zealand (until recently). Even then, the pekapeka and its relatives retained the ability to fly.

3. Compared to birds, bats may simply be too specialized for flight to go back to being completely terrestrial. All living bats have modified hindlimbs and pelvises for flight, because their legs actually make up part of their wings.

It may be difficult to tell from that picture, but a bat’s hind legs are rotated at 90-180 degrees (depending on the species) around from where an ordinary mammal’s would be. In other words, their knees point backwards.

(This is different from a pterosaur, by the way- pterosaurs had wing membranes that attached to their hind limbs as well, but retained forward-pointing knees.)

This makes walking on the ground very difficult for them, and is related to why they roost upside-down. (In fact, some species of bats CAN’T walk on the ground at all!) Even when bats have regained the ability to be good walkers, like the vampire bat has, the style of locomotion is very different from all other living animals, like so:

Originally posted by bundyspooks

It’s not a BAD way to get around, but energetically, it’s not as efficient as regular quadrupedal walking.

So, for a bat to “de-specialize” from flight completely might require extreme evolutionary pressures that don’t exist on earth right now. Not that I don’t think they could do it- but a flightless bat would end up looking really, really weird, compared to the mammals we’re used to.

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(via ScienceAlert (@sciencealert) • Instagram photos and videos)