why sing one part of a broadway song mediocrely when you can try to sing six parts at the same time and sound like a dying walrus??

Things from musicals that are so perfect they are borderline erotic

When Jonathan Groff first comes in in The Bitch of Living.
The third and fourth “burn"s in Burn and Phillipa Soo’s voice all the time. Shoutout to the final “mine” too; that’s gorgeous.
Pia Douwes’s voice, and how it is somehow simultaneously smooth and pure and beautifully rough.
The harmonies at the end of Make Up Your Mind/Catch Me I’m Falling.
The “or"s at the end of lines in Pretty Women.
“Would you think so badly of me” in Sonya and Natasha.
Rudolf’s "dann"s in Wenn Ich Dein Speigel Wär. And the "Nein! Ich möchte leben!” in Elisabeth, Mach Auf Mein Engel.
The dissidence of “trees” in Darkness and Trees.
How Phillipa Soo’s voice blends perfectly with the violins in Natasha Lost.               The harmonies in the chorus of You Love Who You Love.
“I wish I could fly” from Superboy and the Invisible Girl.
That thing in The Bitch of Living when they are all jumping around chaotically and then suddenly are frozen singing “do they think we want this?” (Start at 2:40 for the full effect.)
That thing Karen David does in like every song in Galavant where her voice changes pitch slightly and damn.
The way “sadness” is sung in Don’t Do Sadness. Also the strings.                  How Jeremy Jordan says “history books” in This World Will Remember Us.   waaaaaaaiiiaiiiiiaaaaaaaiiiiiiiiittttttt for meeeeeeeeeee
Damon Daunno’s falsetto. And head voice. So, yeah everything.
The piano in Hurricane.
The thing they do in Stop the World with the turntable and the chairs and everyone singing in a really lovely harmony with just the perfect amount of dissidence and sweet damn I love everything about it.
Absolutely everything about how Philippa Soo sings Times Are Hard for Dreamers. (Her voice is 15% of this list and that’s me holding back help it’s so beautiful.)
Both “nothing, it was nothing, I didn’t lead him on at all” and “back in the theatre full of light” in Natasha Lost.
Jenn Colella singing her phone call in 28 Hours/Wherever We Are.
Jenn Colella everywhere else let’s be real.                                                                The Thing™ Laura Osnes does all the time in Bonnie & Clyde but especially in How ‘Bout A Dance.
When Eva starts singing in High Flying Adored.
How syrupy and rich Jasmine Cephas Jones’ voice is in Say No to This.     Basically every harmony in Hadestown.
That part of Seventeen when JD and Veronica are singing “seventeen” together and he’s singing higher than her. Also when Boote in Der Nacht and Wenn Ich Tanzen Will end the same way.
Everything about Gwyndolyn’s voice, especially when she’s singing her parts of A Happy Ending for Us.
The slight roughness in John Gallagher Jr.’s voice.
How drowsy and sexy Idina Menzel’s voice is in As Long As You’re Mine.
Also when she sings “it well may be” in For Good. (It’s nice for different reasons of course.)
Chris Jackson’s voice in One Last Time. And in every other song.

Lines in Broadway Songs You Must Belt Out NO exceptions
  • how we gonna pay how we gonna pay how we gonna pay LAST YEAR’S RENNNNT
  • SUNDAY IN THE PARK WITH GEOOOOORGE
  • TWO FOUR SIX OH ONEEEEE
  • I BELIEVEEEEEE that Satan has a hold of you I BELIEVEEEEE that the lord God has sent me here and I BELIEVEEEEE
  • RIIIIIIIISE RIIIIIIIIISE RIIIIIIIIIISE RIIIIIIIIIIISE RIIIIIIIIIIIIIISE
  • kiss today goodBYEEEEE
  • its the LAAAAST MIDNIGHT so goodBYEEEE ALLLL
  • but the WORLD WAITS im alive at last and im full of JOYYYYY
  • and all that JAAAAAAZZZZzzzz
  • I want to be RAIN BOW HIIIIIIIIIIGH
  • LIFE IS A CAB-AR-RETTTTTTT
  • I’m flying highhhhhh defYYYYYYYing gravity (i mean if you can hit that F. If you can, good for you. i hate you. we all hate you. get away from me)

in the eye of the hurricane - the last song in a musical before everything goes to shit

hurricane - hamilton // telephone wire - fun home // some things are meant to be - little women: the musical // promise - bare: a pop opera // i don’t care much - cabaret // that face - dogfight // prom climax - carrie // something isn’t right here - bring it on // yo girl - heathers: the musical // waltz for eva and che - evita // not while i’m around - sweeney todd // any moment / moments in the wood - into the woods // talk show - jon & jen // contact - rent // don’t do sadness / blue wind - spring awakening // on the willows - godspell // the long grift - hedwig and the angry inch // bare - bare: a pop opera //

L I S T E N

10

Voice Types according to TV Tropes:

Mezzo-sopranos, being in the most common vocal register for women, come in a wide variety of types. They can be a wide range of ages, although female characters over fifty tend to be altos more often than mezzos. The majority of mezzo singing, especially nowadays, is belting and as such mezzos are especially common in pop- or rock-oriented musicals. Just as the leads in most operas are sopranos, the secondary female characters - commonly referred to as “witches, bitches and britches (cross-dressing roles)” - are generally mezzos; this is not uncommon in modern musicals, where frequently the soprano will be the main love interest and the mezzo her best friend or rival. Also referred to in many productions as a “belt” voice, for someone who can strongly sing passages in the middle and high register in her chest voice (rather than the soprano’s lighter head voice).

{ part one - part two - part three }


[soprano] [contralto] [tenor] [baritone] [bass]

The Signs As Musicals (based on important dates)

Aries - Book of Mormon

Taurus - Gypsy

Gemini - Les Miserables

Cancer - Hamilton

Leo - Evita

Virgo - Heathers: The Musical

Libra - Little Shop of Horrors

Scorpio - Pippin

Sagittarius - RENT

Capricorn - Phantom of the Opera

Aquarius - Miss Saigon

Pisces - Billy Elliot

instagram

The Evita Rose Cleanser! It’s a shame that the pH on this soap is so high, but… it’s so pretty! 😍

10

Voice Types according to TV Tropes:

Tenors are mostly good guys and mostly leading men or ingenues - hence the Tenor Boy trope. There are a couple of villainous tenors and also a few character tenors. Because most people’s voices deepen as they age, there are few tenor roles for men over forty, although Jean Valjean from Les Misérables (one of the rangiest tenor roles in popular musical canon) is usually played by a middle-aged man.


[soprano] [mezzo-soprano] [contralto] [baritone] [bass]