everyone has seen this

xoxotmntluv1997xoxo  asked:

Hey April I have good news and bad news. The good news is that I'm still friends with my friend and everything is good between us. The bad news is that my cousin is missing. It's been 24 hours since he was last seen. His wife, mom, everyone has tried calling him, but he won't answer. The police are even involved now and are going to help look for him. I really hope nothing bad happened to him. 😢 ~Courtney

Oh gosh… have they found your cousin since you sent this? I hope he’s okay.

youtube

Today I learned that if you actually let the timer in the Arrival DLC run out it shows the reapers arriving and destroying the galaxy. Such highlights include:

  • The Citadel being destroyed
  • Shepards helmet (head??) on a SPIKE
  • Destroyed Normandy
  • All your friends and crew lining up to be executed
  • Kellys FACE MELTING OFF

Am I the only one just finding this out because holy shit

Diagnostic criteria for autism are always so badly written.

Like, the trains thing.

I’m going to keep coming back to the trains thing because it baffles me.

So, the example used for special interests in a lot of diagnostic criteria is trains.

“Has an unusually strong interest in something - for example, trains”

And, like, sure. Okay. Special interests can be anything. Trains are a possibility.

But, like, special interests don’t appear out of nowhere. You generally have to be exposed to something first to get a special interest in it.

So, like, I know a lot of autistic people, and I know no one with a special interest in trains.

You know what the most common special interest is, in my experience?

Star Wars.

Yeah, go fucking figure, the ubiquitous movie franchise that almost everyone has seen at least one movie of is the most common special interest, in my experience.

Now, I do kind of understand the trains thing. The line between special interest and regular interest isn’t always super obvious.

Like, collecting Star Wars toys, or writing Star Wars fanfic, or marathoning the movies a bunch of times doesn’t necessarily make it a special interest.

And since it’s socially acceptable (especially in modern day nerd culture) to do all of those things, it’s not a glaring indicator of autism to outsiders.

If someone’s really into something obscure - like trains - however, it can make the fact that it’s a special interest super obvious.

But it’s still bad to have it be the go-to special interest example because it’s just not that common.

Plenty of autistic people don’t have obscure special interests. Their SIs are in the Marvel movies or Star Wars or Star Trek or Five Nights at Freddy’s.

Hell, part of the problem with women and girls not getting diagnosed is because no one notices their special interests in, like, makeup or boy bands.

When you use “trains” as the example, you’re sending the implicit message that special interests have to be obscure and out of the social norm, and that’s just not the case for most people - especially now that a lot of geek culture has gone mainstream and there’s a huge nostalgia cash-in.

Having a special interest in Power Rangers was weird for me when I was 14. It’s not now that it’s a big blockbuster movie and most people exposed to the internet review-sphere are at least aware of Linkara’s History of Power Rangers.

Special interests don’t have to be outside the social norm to be special interests. It’s how the autistic person feels about them and engages with them that defines it.

Welcome to the Ballroom Neck Situation

I have seen quite a few people disparaging the “lengthened necks” in Welcome to the Ballroom PVs. However, in my opinion as an amateur ballroom dancer, these necks are spot-on.

While Shizuku’s and Kyoharu’s necks here might look a bit jarring for many people, I still think they are very laudable attempts to capture dancesport’s posture in animation. 

In dancesport, the spine needs to be stretched and the neck elongated without being broken (i.e. all sides of the neck are lengthened; Kyoharu’s neck is a beautiful example here). 

This gives professional dancers that strong but beautiful and elegant upper carriage, especially in Standard dances, which is what Kyoharu’s practicing here.

Now @tataraswaltz has done an experiment in which they shortened Kyoharu’s neck:

In this edit, Kyoharu’s neck is of a normal length. However, it has lost the intentional stretching and lengthening effect that dancers strive for.

In my opinion, the original, while too exaggerated for many people’s liking, has managed to convey that effect.

Here’s a screencap of Mirko Gozzoli and Edita Daniute dancing the Tango:

We can clearly see Gozzoli stretching his neck.

And here is Daniute elongating hers:

Therefore, I have no problems with Welcome to the Ballroom’s extra long necks whatsoever. 

I also think that the jarring effect in Kyoharu’s screenshot above is caused not by his neck, but by the framing

By focusing on only Kyoharu’s head here, the animators have cut his neck off his spine and shoulders. This type of headshot works in normal situations, because we are used to normal postures. We don’t need to see the entire upper body to know where our shoulders are with respect to our neck, how our spine is straightened or slumped in everyday postures.

But dance postures are different and not something everyone has seen or assumed regularly. 

It’s therefore harder for us to instinctively imagine how the shoulders are positioned or how the spine is elongated when a dancer stretches their neck upwards. Presenting any of these elements on their own would be confusing, as our mind might not be able to conjure up the whole dance postures immediately. 

If we cut Daniute’s neck off her body in the above picture, it would be as weird-looking as Kyoharu’s neck.

But when we can see their entire upper bodies, their necks are no longer so weird. 

This is a much better view of Kyoharu’s posture. We can see how his lengthened neck is connected to the rest of his upper body, creating beautiful lines. In this case, we no longer register Kyoharu’s lengthened neck as ludicrously odd. 

So far, Welcome to the Ballroom PVs have impressed me with their dance postures animation.

Preach, Kaname!

I can’t wait for the anime to come out!

100% Vampire Widow Skin

Because it is subtle and I still see some people not convinced/#IWantToBelieve-ing @ the Huntress and Comtesse skins so I turned my in game screenshots to take at 9x resolution and took some pics

So yeah this are inarguably fang marks. Think everyone has seen these by now but at least I haven’t seen them at this resolution yet

Teeth! Pointy little teeth! 

And in case you didn’t notice in the last two pictures, her eyes are clearly not normal. They’re a deeper gold than usual and have red pupils. They also are shinier, I think? I’ve noticed in some lights they can appear almost completely gold or completely red which is neat.

So hey even if she didn’t get a Halloween skin at least she still technically has a vampire one

I know this isn’t the first post of this flying around but since I haven’t seen screenshots this clear yet I decided to share

The Thing About Trauma

It’s not as easy
as being Something That Happened to You,
a package you opened once.

You will wake up in a new ZIP code,
have to wander your way home,
carry a few of the things you love
to this new place
you live in now.

& so you buy throw pillows.
You put up twinkle lights
and have a big celebration,
point at the open windows
and tell everyone who has ever seen you crying,

look,

look how I have not caged myself,
look what I have made
out of two paint buckets
and the blessing of my still-here body,

but, of course, trauma leans into the bar cart.
Spills a drink on the new rug.
Breaks off the door handle on his way out.

Trauma sends you letters,
without warning,
for the rest of your life,
usually disguised as something else— 

a medical bill, maybe,
or a box of photo albums packaged up by your father,
just so you remember
trauma knows exactly where you live—

who did you think built the house?