everyday carry knife

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I’ve been looking for an alternative to necker knife style carry and belt carry knives. I don’t like the looseness of the necker knife or the bulk of the belt knife. Here is my take on a wrist carry knife. It provides easy access on the off-hand while staying within the boundary of a fashion wrist cuff.

Available as  a PRE-ORDER through my etsy store: etsy.com/shop/thepxsmith

Today’s EDC:

Glock 30 Gen 4
KYTEX Shooting Gear Mag Carrier
Chiappa Rhino 200DS .357 Magnum
Elzetta Alpha Flashlight
Hinderer Knives XM-18 Bowie Blade
ADV Tactical Mini Butcher

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submitted by Jonathan Tayag

A handy pocket knife is one of those things we EDCers love to collect. Some zero in on their favorite material, like titanium or wood handles, others might collect knives from their favorite designer. But for many enthusiasts, knives with a damascus blade and their distinct wave pattern are a prized part of their collection. While they’re stunningly beautiful knives, they shouldn’t be thought of as just display pieces — they’re capable tools in their own right. In this guide, we’ll explain what makes a Damascus knife so special and list some great options worth a spot in your collection.

What is a Damascus knife?

While you might see a knife proudly featuring a Damascus steel blade, it’s worth mentioning that Damascus steel isn’t actually a specific kind of steel at all. Rather, it refers to the process of forging different steels together to form a single blade, which you can see in its characteristic wavy, layered pattern.

They get their name from the ancient knives and swords forged in the Near East. They exhibited extraordinary strength, sharpness, and durability for their time. Unfortunately, history has long since forgotten the original process of making them.

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The modern Damascus blades you can purchase today are not archaeological artifacts. Bladesmiths mix excellent blade steels like VG-10 and more to make these knives. So while they aren’t exactly historical, they’ll perform well and hold a great edge. And unlike the blades of old, they usually have the modern features you want in a good everyday carry knife.

Damascus steel knives are sometimes referred to and marketed as pattern-welded steel knives. Beware of knives that aren’t actually Damascus and only have lines etched or painted on. If it isn’t different steels welded together, it isn’t actually Damascus. Here are 8 examples of knives with a Damascus blade.


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Spyderco Endura 4 Titanium Damascus

The Endura 4 is a classic EDC blade, and Spyderco has put out a Damascus variant of the knife to celebrate its longevity and popularity. The sub-4” blade is made out of DPS 15, a Japanese stainless steel mixed with VG-10. The handle is also special, made out of 6AL4V titanium, and it holds the blade in shape with a lockback mechanism.

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SOG Arcitech Damascus

The Arcitech is a classy knife in its own right, but with a Damascus blade and carbon fiber handle it’s on a different level. It has a 3.5” clip point blade made out of a Japanese mix of VG-10 and nickel. It’s been acid-etched to emphasize the 15 layers in the blade.

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Boker Plus Damascus Gent 1

The Gent 1 features a stunning 3.25” Damascus steel drop point blade with 67 layers. It’s a beautiful knife that has a discreet and classy element when closed because of its ebony wood handle.

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Victorinox Swiss Army Outrider Damast

This is not your grandfather’s Swiss Army knife, but it can be your own heirloom to pass on in the future. The limited edition Outrider Damast features a 4.4” blade with 115 layers of steel welded together. It also features 10 useful EDC features including a pair of scissors, numerous screwdrivers, and bottle and can openers.

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Kershaw Damascus Chive

The standard Kershaw Chive is an EDC favorite, and this one is made even better now that it features a ladder-patterned Damascus blade. This version also includes a frame lock to complement the blazing fast SpeedSafe assisted flipper opening of the knife.

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Mcusta MC-16D

This Japanese knife marries the elegant VG-10 core Damascus steel aesthetic with a refined quince wood grain handle. This combination makes for an attractive modern gent’s knife.

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ESEE Damascus Izula

If you’re looking for a fixed blade, the Damascus Izula is for you. It has the same lightweight minimalist skeletonized construction of the regular knife, but this one’s been forged out of a single piece of Damascus steel.

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Do you like the idea of Damascus steel on your EDC blade? Whether it’s for the looks or the performance, let us know in a comment below.

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New survival cuffs from Explosiventure and four new colors available.

The new model has a few new features including; a 1 1/2” ferrous rod tucked under the dog tag; serration on the back of the blade for better results striking the ferrous rod; a water proof fire starter between the printed dog tag and a second tag.

These are a powerful tool for survival and daily use.

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submitted by Jonathan Tayag

There’s something special about the way a knife with a wood grain handle looks and feels when it’s in your hand. It’s a classy and timeless look you don’t get with the trendy metal and polymer handles that you see on other knives. And unlike most knife handle materials, wood grain only gets better with age. Wooden handled knives like this can be more than just a tool in your EDC. You might even treasure one enough to pass down like an heirloom. In this guide, we’ve put together this list of our favorite knives with wooden handles, ranging from classic traditional knives to modern tools with an organic touch.


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Opinel No. 8

While the Opinel may be simple, it’s a great way to get an excellent wood grain knife in your hands. This sharp knife has a bubinga wood handle that’s a step up from the standard handle. Bubinga is a pinkish-red hardwood from Central Africa that darkens with age.

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Victorinox Swiss Army EvoWood

Seeing a Swiss Army knife without its traditional red design can feel a bit strange, I’ll admit. But the ergonomic walnut wood handle on the EvoWood does not look out of place at all. And with 19 different functions tucked into such a small package, you’ll find a use for it wherever you go.

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Buck “The 55”

Buck’s had a lot of experience making beautiful traditional wood grain knives. The 55 is a smaller, lighter, and slimmer take on the venerable 110 folding hunter knife. It has a solid lockback folding mechanism and a sharp 420HC clip point blade. Like its larger cousin, it also sports a gorgeous American walnut handle.

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LionSteel Opera

This knife is a marriage of design tenets of both the past and the present. The LionSteel Opera boasts a pretty olive wood handle, a classic gent’s lockback design, and a modern D2 steel drop point blade. It’s also available with a darker cocobolo wood handle, if you prefer that.

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CRKT M4-02W

The burled wood handles on the CRKT M4-02W give it a lively character that you don’t find on most wood grain knives. It’s a unique finish achieved from a tree that’s undergone some stress during its life. And if you find yourself in a bit of stress in carrying this knife, its Outburst assisted opening will help you out.

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Fallkniven P3G

The Fallkniven P3G combines modern 3G powder steel with an attractive cocobolo paneled handle. It’s a modern take on the traditional hunter’s everyday carry knife. The wood handle also helps prevent extending the lock on the knife too far and bending it out of sorts.

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Benchmade North Fork

The stabilized wood on the North Fork’s handle stands up to the elements better than regular wood. It retains the timeless and elegant looks, but with signature Benchmade design hallmarks. It sports a solid sub-3" S30V drop point blade that locks into place with an ambidextrous axis lock.

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Boker Plus Exskelibur II

The best way to pair the timeless class of a wood grain knife is to mate it with a stunning damascus steel blade. The Boker Plus Exskelibur II does just that. The 2.75" drop point blade is hollow ground and covered in the exquisite wave patterns of damascus steel. The ergonomic handle has dark cocobolo wood panels and comes with a titanium clip. This is more than an everyday carry knife; it’s a thing of beauty.

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Deejo Naked 37G

As its name implies, this slim and elegant 420HC steel knife weighs only 37 grams. It does this with a weight-efficient, skeletonized frame handle. The top has an attractive juniper wood embellishment. The bottom of the frame locks the knife into place.

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SOG Twitch II Rosewood

The Twitch II has a lightning-fast assisted opening and a great 2.65” AUS-8 blade. Now with a rosewood handle it’s got more of a classy gent’s character. The wood also offers a little more grip in your hands compared to the regular Twitch’s aluminum handle.

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What’s your favorite woodgrain handle EDC knife? Is it a more traditional style, or a modern design? Leave a comment below and let us know.

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If you’re looking for a compact everyday carry knife, you might think that a folding knife is your only option. But have you considered a fixed blade? At first glance they might not seem like the best for EDC, but you’d be surprised. They actually offer a few advantages over their folding counterparts that make them better-suited for your EDC. In this guide we’ll break down the benefits of fixed blades and show you 10 excellent options that offer serious performance at a size and weight that puts some folders to shame.

What’s a “fixed blade,” and why would I carry one instead of a folding knife?

In short, it’s a knife that doesn’t fold into the handle, and usually carried in a protective sheath. While folding knives are more convenient for many people, a fixed blade has its own set of advantages:

  • More reliable: with no moving parts to break, they won’t fail on you during hard use.
  • Knife legality: if folding knives are restricted where you live, a small fixed blade might be a legal carry option instead.
  • Alternative carry options: you can carry one at your belt, on your leg, in a boot, around your neck, or even attach it to your bag, instead of taking up more space in your pocket.

If it sounds like your EDC could benefit from a fixed blade, check out these knife options.


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Schrade Neck Knife

This drop point fixed blade knife with a sharp sub-2” edge slides into a sheath that functions as a cash and card clip. The round hole in the handle makes it easy for you to draw the knife but also holds the knife in place when not in use.

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Ontario Knife Company Little Bird

The Little Bird features a 1.75” blade made of strong 1095 carbon steel in an attractive black oxide finish. It also integrates a glass breaker in the handle, making it useful for getting out of emergency situations.

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TOPS Mini Bowie

Who says bowie knives have to be huge? The Mini Bowie from TOPS certainly isn’t. It has a 2” 1095 carbon steel blade and measures only 4.25” overall. Despite its compact size, it retains the signature bowie deep belly and upswept tip that lets it cut like a much larger knife.

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CRKT Minimalist Tanto

The tanto blade on this knife is excellent for compact EDC knives because it’s proficient at piercing tasks. CRKT pairs the blade with a lightweight ergonomic handle that molds itself to your grip and guards against cutting yourself on the blade.

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SOG Instinct Mini G10

With the textured G10 handles on the SOG Instinct Mini, you’re able to wield its clip point blade with expert control. At just 1.6 ounces, you’ll barely notice it in its sheath when worn as a neck or belt knife.

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ESEE Candiru

The Candiru is a lightweight, skeletonized neck knife that weighs just 1.6 ounces. Despite the minimal frame and light weight, its hard 1096 carbon steel makes it capable even for rough use. If you want to add a bit of grip texture you can wrap paracord around the handle and keep a supply on hand for emergencies.

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Spyderco ARK

Spyderco’s ARK, or Always-Ready Knife, is designed to be useful even when your hands are slippery and wet. The blade itself is made of H-1 steel, a special alloy immune to rusting. It features Spyderco’s signature ergonomics and a serrated edge that makes quick work out of anything you take to it.

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Boker Plus Mini Slik Tanto

The Mini Slik is small enough to fit in the palm of your hand, but don’t think it’s a lightweight knife. It may only weigh 1.7 ounces but the tanto blade maximizes cutting and piercing performance. Plus, the ergonomic handle makes this knife easy to use.

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DPx Gear HEAT Hiker

This knife features a unique skeletonized design that incorporates a carabiner in the handle. You can hook it on directly to your gear for easy access when you need it, while it’s ultra light weight makes it an invisible, yet essential addition to any carry.

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Buck 113 Ranger

The Buck 113 Ranger has a timeless, traditional design that’s a break from the tactical skeletonized knives that dominate this list. It features 420HC blade steel and premium walnut wood handles that fits any gentleman’s EDC. It’s a bit bigger and longer than its peers on this list, but it is one of the smaller traditional fixed blades you can carry.

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Do you carry a fixed blade knife in favor of a folding one? Let us know why and which your favorite is in the comments!

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submitted by Jonathan Tayag

Before, if you wanted a gent’s knife, it usually meant you’d have to settle for something with a traditional design and outdated materials. But times are changing, and maybe you want a classy knife with a modern design (and performance) to match your lifestyle. With its clean lines and aluminum styling, the Gerber Pocket Square pairs well with a nice suit or a sharp dress. It has a modern minimalist gents aesthetic that can be as sharp as the way you look.

It starts with a design that’s true to its name. It has a sleek aluminum handle with squared off edges and attractive lines beveled onto it for grip. The Pocket Square features a 3" drop point blade that rests flush with the handle when closed. You can swing it open with either hand because it has ambidextrous thumb lifts that also lie flush.

The secure liner lock holds the blade in place when deployed but it also doesn’t disrupt the knife’s look. In a similar way, you can keep the reversible tip-up deep carry pocket clip or remove it if it suits you. And if aluminum doesn’t do it for you there’s a glass-filled nylon handle version to choose from.

The Gerber Pocket Square is a great everyday carry knife, whether you’re taking it out for a night on the town or going about business as usual during the day. Make it part of your own classy ensemble at buy one the link below.

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