every fan ever

every celeb ever: my fans are the best friends they are the sweetest people in the world. 

the rest of us: your fans are demons. theyre mean, theyre rude, and they tell people to kill themselves. 

so about a year and a half ago, i set out to draw every clara outfit ever
74 outfits later, i’m finally done

prints/mugs/totes and all that jazz are up on society6 and redbubble now!

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In a lot of ways, Kate and I have really grown up in this industry together; we’ve been a support mechanism for each other for such a long period of time. We’ve been there for each other and helped guide each other.

i just saw a picture of the blm flag on the stage and read this person’s account of what happened when they threw the flag on stage and i’m…. not gonna lie i’m disheartened

someone: you can’t just take the characters and ignore canon? like, canon is where the characters are from, you can’t just be a fan of the characters completely detached from canon

me: *running away with my arms full of ooc characters and ships that make no sense in canon and obscure headcanons and theories* you cant catch me im the gingerbread man

HOW SKAM’S ISAK AND EVEN REVOLUTIONIZED TEEN TV

The third season of Norwegian teen series Skam dismantled stereotypes, coerced schoolkids into skiving off classes and turned homophobes into rainbow flag-waving defenders—and it first began airing one year ago today. It was the “gay” season, charting the blossoming relationship of Isak Valtersen and Even Bech Næsheim, both coming to terms with their sexuality amidst a cutting background of teenage angst. Taking every fan poll I’ve ever come across into account, season three was by far Skam’s most popular. It broke streaming records in Norway, and television viewership records in neighboring Denmark and Sweden. Throughout its 10-episode run, it hardly left the list of worldwide trending topics on any given social platform.

With a short promo clip that could have been a stand in for a gay snuff film—jockish throbs in a locker room being showered with milk in slow motion—the series wasn’t afraid to shy away from explicitly homosexual subject matter. Or any hot button subject. Homophobia, bullying, mental health—nothing was off the cards for series creator Julie Andem.

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